skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Brachytherapy Improves Survival in Stage III Endometrial Cancer With Cervical Involvement

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the survival benefit of adding vaginal brachytherapy (BT) to pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in women with stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify patients with stage III endometrial cancer from 2004 to 2013. Only women who received adjuvant EBRT were analyzed. Women were grouped according to receipt of BT. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify predictors of receiving BT. Log–rank statistics were used to compare survival outcomes. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the effect of BT on survival. A propensity score–matched analysis was also conducted among women with cervical involvement. Results: We evaluated 12,988 patients with stage III endometrial carcinoma, 39% of whom received EBRT plus BT. Women who received BT were more likely to have endocervical or cervical stromal involvement (odds ratios 2.03 and 1.77; P<.01, respectively). For patients receiving EBRT alone, the 5-year survival was 66% versus 69% with the addition of BT at 5 years (P<.01). Brachytherapy remained significantly predictive of decreased risk of death (hazard ratio 0.86; P<.01) on multivariate Cox regression. The addition of BT to EBRT did not affect survival among women without cervical involvement (P=.84). Formore » women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion, the addition of BT significantly improved survival (log–rank P<.01). Receipt of EBRT plus BT was associated with improved survival in women with positive and negative surgical margins, and receiving chemotherapy did not alter the benefit of BT. Propensity score–matched analysis results confirmed the benefit of BT among women with cervical involvement (hazard ratio 0.80; P=.01). Conclusions: In this population of women with stage III endometrial cancer the addition of BT to EBRT was associated with an improvement in survival for women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2];  [3]; ;  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)
  3. Division of Epidemiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649894
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 97; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BRACHYTHERAPY; CHEMOTHERAPY; EXTERNAL BEAM RADIATION THERAPY; MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; WOMEN

Citation Formats

Bingham, Brian, Orton, Andrew, Boothe, Dustin, Stoddard, Greg, Huang, Y. Jessica, Gaffney, David K., and Poppe, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.poppe@hci.utah.edu. Brachytherapy Improves Survival in Stage III Endometrial Cancer With Cervical Involvement. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.12.035.
Bingham, Brian, Orton, Andrew, Boothe, Dustin, Stoddard, Greg, Huang, Y. Jessica, Gaffney, David K., & Poppe, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.poppe@hci.utah.edu. Brachytherapy Improves Survival in Stage III Endometrial Cancer With Cervical Involvement. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.12.035.
Bingham, Brian, Orton, Andrew, Boothe, Dustin, Stoddard, Greg, Huang, Y. Jessica, Gaffney, David K., and Poppe, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.poppe@hci.utah.edu. Sat . "Brachytherapy Improves Survival in Stage III Endometrial Cancer With Cervical Involvement". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.12.035.
@article{osti_22649894,
title = {Brachytherapy Improves Survival in Stage III Endometrial Cancer With Cervical Involvement},
author = {Bingham, Brian and Orton, Andrew and Boothe, Dustin and Stoddard, Greg and Huang, Y. Jessica and Gaffney, David K. and Poppe, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.poppe@hci.utah.edu},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate the survival benefit of adding vaginal brachytherapy (BT) to pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in women with stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify patients with stage III endometrial cancer from 2004 to 2013. Only women who received adjuvant EBRT were analyzed. Women were grouped according to receipt of BT. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify predictors of receiving BT. Log–rank statistics were used to compare survival outcomes. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the effect of BT on survival. A propensity score–matched analysis was also conducted among women with cervical involvement. Results: We evaluated 12,988 patients with stage III endometrial carcinoma, 39% of whom received EBRT plus BT. Women who received BT were more likely to have endocervical or cervical stromal involvement (odds ratios 2.03 and 1.77; P<.01, respectively). For patients receiving EBRT alone, the 5-year survival was 66% versus 69% with the addition of BT at 5 years (P<.01). Brachytherapy remained significantly predictive of decreased risk of death (hazard ratio 0.86; P<.01) on multivariate Cox regression. The addition of BT to EBRT did not affect survival among women without cervical involvement (P=.84). For women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion, the addition of BT significantly improved survival (log–rank P<.01). Receipt of EBRT plus BT was associated with improved survival in women with positive and negative surgical margins, and receiving chemotherapy did not alter the benefit of BT. Propensity score–matched analysis results confirmed the benefit of BT among women with cervical involvement (hazard ratio 0.80; P=.01). Conclusions: In this population of women with stage III endometrial cancer the addition of BT to EBRT was associated with an improvement in survival for women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.12.035},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 97,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Purpose: To assess the role of radiotherapy (RT) in women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The 17-registry Survival, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was searched for patients with lymph node-positive non-Stage IV epithelial endometrial cancer diagnosed and treated between 1988 and 1998. Two subgroups were identified: those with organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and those with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer with direct extension of the primary tumor. RT was coded as external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT). Observed survival (OS) was reported with a minimum of 5 years of follow-up; the survival curves were comparedmore » using the log-rank test. Results: The therapy data revealed 611 women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer during this period. Of these women, 51% were treated with adjuvant EBRT, 21% with EBRT and BT, and 28% with no additional RT (NAT). Of the 611 patients, 293 had organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and 318 patients had Stage IIIC endometrial cancer with direct extension of the primary tumor. The 5-year OS rate for all patients was 40% with NAT, 56% after EBRT, and 64% after EBRT/BT. Adjuvant RT improved survival compared with NAT (p <0.001). In patients with organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer, the 5-year OS rate was 50% for NAT, 64% for EBRT, and 67% for EBRT/BT. Again, adjuvant RT contributed to improved survival compared with NAT (p = 0.02). In patients with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and direct tumor extension, the 5-year OS rate was 34% for NAT, 47% for EBRT, and 63% for EBRT/BT. RT improved OS compared with NAT (p <0.001). Also, in this high-risk subgroup, adding BT to EBRT was superior to EBRT alone (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer receiving adjuvant EBRT and EBRT/BT had improved OS compared with patients receiving NAT. When direct extension of the primary tumor was present, the addition of BT to EBRT was even more beneficial.« less
  • Purpose: To test, in a single-arm, prospective, phase 2 trial, whether adding the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib to concurrent chemoradiotherapy for previously untreated, locally advanced, inoperable non-small cell lung cancer would improve survival and disease control without increasing toxicity. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients with previously untreated non-small cell lung cancer received intensity modulated radiation therapy (63 Gy/35 fractions) on Monday through Friday, with chemotherapy (paclitaxel 45 mg/m², carboplatin area under the curve [AUC] = 2) on Mondays, for 7 weeks. All patients also received the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib (150 mg orally 1/d) on Tuesday-Sunday for 7 weeks, followedmore » by consolidation paclitaxel–carboplatin. The primary endpoint was time to progression; secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), toxicity, response, and disease control and whether any endpoint differed by EGFR mutation status. Results: Of 46 patients evaluable for response, 40 were former or never-smokers, and 41 were evaluable for EGFR mutations (37 wild-type [WT] and 4 mutated [all adenocarcinoma]). Median time to progression was 14.0 months and did not differ by EGFR status. Toxicity was acceptable (no grade 5, 1 grade 4, 11 grade 3). Twelve patients (26%) had complete responses (10 WT, 2 mutated), 27 (59%) partial (21 WT, 2 mutated, 4 unknown), and 7 (15%) none (6 WT, 2 mutated, 1 unknown) (P=.610). At 37.0 months' follow-up (range, 3.6-76.5 months) for all patients, median OS time was 36.5 months, and 1-, 2-, and 5-year OS rates were 82.6%, 67.4%, and 35.9%, respectively; none differed by mutation status. Twelve patients had no progression, and 34 had local and/or distant failure. Eleven of 27 distant failures were in the brain (7 WT, 3 mutated, 1 unknown). Conclusions: Toxicity and OS were promising, but time to progression did not meet expectations. The prevalence of distant failures underscores the need for effective systemic therapy.« less
  • Purpose: This prospective, nonrandomized study evaluates the effectiveness of epoetin alfa to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to14 g/dL (optimal range for tumor oxygenation) during chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer and its impact on overall survival (OS), metastatic-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC). Methods and Materials: Ninety-six patients were included. Forty-two patients received epoetin alfa (150 IU/kg, 3 times a week) during radiotherapy, which was started at hemoglobin less than 13 g/dL and stopped at 14 g/dL or higher. Hemoglobin levels were measured weekly during RT. Results: Both groups were balanced for age, sex, performance status, tumormore » length/location, histology, grading, T-stage/N-stage, chemotherapy, treatment schedule, and hemoglobin before RT. Median change of hemoglobin was +0.3 g/dL/wk with epoetin alfa and -0.5 g/dL/wk without epoetin alfa. At least 60% of hemoglobin levels were 12 to 14 g/dL in 64% and 17% of the patients, respectively (p < 0.001). Patients who received epoetin alfa had better OS (32% vs. 8% at 2 years, p = 0.009) and LC (67% vs. 15% at 2 years, p = 0.001). MFS was not significantly different (42% vs. 18% at 2 years, p = 0.09). Conclusions: The findings suggest that epoetin alfa when used to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to 14 g/dL can improve OS and LC of Stage III esophageal cancer patients.« less
  • Purpose: Several surgical series have identified subcarinal, contralateral, and multilevel nodal involvement as predictors of poor overall survival in patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive resection. This retrospective study evaluates the impact of extent and location of mediastinal lymph node (LN) involvement on survival in patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 106 consecutive patients with T1-4 N2-3 Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy at University of Pennsylvania between January 2003 and February 2009. For this analysis, mediastinal LN stations were divided into four mutually exclusive groups:more » supraclavicular, ipsilateral mediastinum, contralateral mediastinum, and subcarinal. Patients' conditions were then analyzed according to the extent of involvement and location of mediastinal LN stations. Results: The majority (88%) of patients received sequential or concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 32.6 months. By multivariable Cox modeling, chemotherapy use (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.21 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.07-0.63]) was associated with improved overall survival. Increasing primary tumor [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose avidity (HR: 1.11 [CI: 1.06-1.19]), and subcarinal involvement (HR: 2.29 [CI: 1.11-4.73]) were significant negative predictors of overall survival. On univariate analysis, contralateral nodal involvement (HR: 0.70 [CI: 0.33-1.47]), supraclavicular nodal involvement (HR: 0.78 [CI: 0.38-1.67]), multilevel nodal involvement (HR: 0.97 [CI: 0.58-1.61]), and tumor size (HR: 1.04 [CI: 0.94-1.14]) did not predict for overall survival. Patients with subcarinal involvement also had lower rates of 2-year nodal control (51.2% vs. 74.9%, p = 0.047) and 2-year distant control (28.4% vs. 61.2%, p = 0.043). Conclusions: These data suggest that the factors that determine oncologic outcome in Stage III NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy are distinct from those observed in patients who undergo surgical resection. The ultimate efficacy of radiation in locally advanced NSCLC is dependent on the intrinsic biology of the tumor.« less
  • Purpose: To assess the use of brachytherapy (BT) with or without external beam radiation (EBRT) in inoperable stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma in the United States and to determine the effect of BT on overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS). Methods and Materials: Data between 1998 and 2011 from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database were analyzed. Coarsened exact matching was used to adjust for differences in age and grade between patients who received BT and those who did not. Prognostic factors affecting OS and CSS were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method and a Coxmore » proportional hazards regression model. Results: A total of 460 patients with inoperable stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma treated with radiation therapy were identified. Radiation consisted of either EBRT (n=260) or BT with or without EBRT (n=200). The only factor associated with BT use was younger patient age (median age, 72 vs 76 years, P=.001). Patients who received BT had a higher 3-year OS (60% vs 47%, P<.001) and CSS (82% vs 74%, P=.032) compared with those who did not. On multivariate analysis, BT use was independently associated with an improved OS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.52-0.87) and CSS (HR 0.61, 95% CI 0.39-0.93). When patients were matched on age, BT use remained significant on multivariate analysis for OS (HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.48-0.87) and CSS (HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.31-0.84). When matched on age and grade, BT remained independently associated with improved OS and CSS (OS HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.46-0.83; CSS HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.34-0.92). Conclusion: Brachytherapy is independently associated with improved OS and CSS. It should be considered as part of the treatment regimen for stage I inoperable endometrial cancer patients undergoing radiation.« less