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Title: Radical Cystectomy Compared to Combined Modality Treatment for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Abstract

Purpose: To perform a comprehensive comparison of overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), progression-free survival (PFS), and treatment-related complications between radical cystectomy (RC) and combined modality treatment (CMT—radiation therapy, concurrent chemotherapy, and maximal transurethral resection of bladder tumor) in the setting of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: We searched 7 databases (PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Proquest, CINAHL, and (ClinicalTrials.gov)) for randomized, controlled trials and prospective and retrospective studies directly comparing RC with CMT from database inception to March 2016. We conducted meta-analyses evaluating OS, DSS, and PFS with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Nineteen studies evaluating 12,380 subjects were selected. For the 8 studies encompassing 9554 subjects eligible for meta-analyses, we found no difference in OS at 5 years (HR 0.96, favoring CMT, 95% CI 0.72-1.29; P=.778) or 10 years (HR 1.02, favoring cystectomy, 95% CI 0.73-1.42; P=.905). No difference was observed in DSS at 5 years (HR 0.83, favoring radiation, 95% CI 0.54-1.28; P=.390) or 10 years (HR 1.17, favoring cystectomy, 95% CI 0.89-1.55; P=.264), or PFS at 10 years (HR 0.85, favoring CMT, 95% CI 0.43-1.67; P=.639). The cystectomy arms had higher rates of early major complications, whereas rates of minor complications were similar between the 2 treatments. Conclusion: Current meta-analysis reveals no differences inmore » OS, DSS, or PFS between RC and CMT. Further randomized, controlled trials are necessary to identify the optimal treatment for specific patients.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]; ;  [2];  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)
  2. Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States)
  3. Rush Medical College, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649890
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 97; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BLADDER; CHEMOTHERAPY; NEOPLASMS; RADICALS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Vashistha, Vishal, Wang, Hanzhang, Mazzone, Andrew, Liss, Michael A., Svatek, Robert S., Schleicher, Mary, and Kaushik, Dharam, E-mail: Kaushik@uthscsa.edu. Radical Cystectomy Compared to Combined Modality Treatment for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.11.056.
Vashistha, Vishal, Wang, Hanzhang, Mazzone, Andrew, Liss, Michael A., Svatek, Robert S., Schleicher, Mary, & Kaushik, Dharam, E-mail: Kaushik@uthscsa.edu. Radical Cystectomy Compared to Combined Modality Treatment for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.11.056.
Vashistha, Vishal, Wang, Hanzhang, Mazzone, Andrew, Liss, Michael A., Svatek, Robert S., Schleicher, Mary, and Kaushik, Dharam, E-mail: Kaushik@uthscsa.edu. Sat . "Radical Cystectomy Compared to Combined Modality Treatment for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.11.056.
@article{osti_22649890,
title = {Radical Cystectomy Compared to Combined Modality Treatment for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis},
author = {Vashistha, Vishal and Wang, Hanzhang and Mazzone, Andrew and Liss, Michael A. and Svatek, Robert S. and Schleicher, Mary and Kaushik, Dharam, E-mail: Kaushik@uthscsa.edu},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To perform a comprehensive comparison of overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), progression-free survival (PFS), and treatment-related complications between radical cystectomy (RC) and combined modality treatment (CMT—radiation therapy, concurrent chemotherapy, and maximal transurethral resection of bladder tumor) in the setting of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: We searched 7 databases (PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Proquest, CINAHL, and (ClinicalTrials.gov)) for randomized, controlled trials and prospective and retrospective studies directly comparing RC with CMT from database inception to March 2016. We conducted meta-analyses evaluating OS, DSS, and PFS with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Nineteen studies evaluating 12,380 subjects were selected. For the 8 studies encompassing 9554 subjects eligible for meta-analyses, we found no difference in OS at 5 years (HR 0.96, favoring CMT, 95% CI 0.72-1.29; P=.778) or 10 years (HR 1.02, favoring cystectomy, 95% CI 0.73-1.42; P=.905). No difference was observed in DSS at 5 years (HR 0.83, favoring radiation, 95% CI 0.54-1.28; P=.390) or 10 years (HR 1.17, favoring cystectomy, 95% CI 0.89-1.55; P=.264), or PFS at 10 years (HR 0.85, favoring CMT, 95% CI 0.43-1.67; P=.639). The cystectomy arms had higher rates of early major complications, whereas rates of minor complications were similar between the 2 treatments. Conclusion: Current meta-analysis reveals no differences in OS, DSS, or PFS between RC and CMT. Further randomized, controlled trials are necessary to identify the optimal treatment for specific patients.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.11.056},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 97,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate our long-term results of bladder preservation with brachytherapy in the treatment of bladder cancer. Methods and materials: Between 1987 and 2000, 108 patients with T1-G3 and T2-T3a stages of bladder cancer were treated with a transurethral resection (TUR) and a course of external beam radiotherapy (30 Gy in 15 fractions) followed by brachytherapy (40 Gy). All tumors were solitary lesions with a diameter {<=}5 cm. Median follow-up was 54 months (range, 1-178 months). Results: The 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 62% and 50%, respectively. The 5-year and 10-year disease-specific survival rates were 73% and 67%,more » respectively. The actuarial local control rate was 73% at 5 and 73% at 10 years, respectively. The 5-year and 10-year disease-specific survival rates for patients with a preserved bladder were 68% and 59%, respectively. Of all long-term surviving patients, 90% preserved their native bladders. The treatment was well tolerated. Acute toxicity was mild. Two patients experienced serious late toxicity: 1 patient developed a persisting vesicocutaneous fistula and the other a stricture of the urethra and ureters. Conclusion: For patients with solitary, organ confined invasive bladder cancer {<=}5 cm, bladder preservation with brachytherapy is an excellent alternative to radical cystectomy and combined modality treatment.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the differences in outcomes among patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer on NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocols 9906 and 0233 who achieved complete response and near-complete response after induction chemoradiation and then completed bladder-preserving therapy with chemoradiation therapy (chemo-RT) to full dose (60-64 Gy). Patients and Methods: A pooled analysis was performed on 119 eligible patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer enrolled on NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trials 9906 and 0233, who were classified as having a complete (T0) or near-complete (Ta or Tis) response after induction chemo-RT and completed consolidation with a total RT dose ofmore » at least 60 Gy. Bladder recurrence, salvage cystectomy rates, and disease-specific survival were estimated by the cumulative incidence method and bladder-intact and overall survivals by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Among the 119 eligible patients, 101 (85%) achieved T0, and 18 (15%) achieved Ta or Tis after induction chemo-RT and proceeded to consolidation. After a median follow-up of 5.9 years, 36 of 101 T0 patients (36%) versus 5 of 18 Ta or Tis patients (28%) experienced bladder recurrence (P=.52). Thirteen patients among complete responders eventually required late salvage cystectomy for tumor recurrence, compared with 1 patient among near-complete responders (P=.63). Disease-specific, bladder-intact, and overall survivals were not significantly different between T0 and Ta/Tis cases. Conclusions: The bladder recurrence and salvage cystectomy rates of the complete and the near-complete responders were similar. Therefore it is reasonable to recommend that patients with Ta or Tis after induction chemo-RT continue with bladder-sparing therapy with consolidation chemo-RT to full dose (60-64 Gy).« less
  • Purpose: To conduct a retrospective analysis within a large university teaching hospital, comparing outcomes between patients receiving either radical surgery or radiotherapy as curative treatment for bladder cancer. Patients and Methods: Between March 1996 and December 2000, 169 patients were treated radically for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Data were collected from patient notes. Statistical analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to compare radiotherapy and surgical outcome data. Results: There was no difference in overall, cause-specific, and distant recurrence-free survival at 5 years between the two groups, despite the radiotherapy group being older (median age, 75.3more » years vs. 68.2 years). There were 31 local bladder recurrences in the radiotherapy group (24 solitary), but there was no significant difference in distant recurrence-free survival. In a more recent (2002-2006) cohort, the median age of radiotherapy patients but not the cystectomy patients was higher than in the 1996-2000 cohort (78.4 years vs. 75.3 years for radiotherapy and 67.9 years vs. 68.2 years for surgery). Conclusions: Although the patients undergoing radical cystectomy were significantly younger than the radiotherapy patients, treatment modality did not influence survival. Bladder cancer patients are an increasingly elderly group. Radical radiotherapy is a viable treatment option for these patients, with the advantage of organ preservation.« less
  • Purpose/Objective(s): To review our experience with bladder-preserving trimodality treatment (TMT) using hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of elderly patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of elderly patients treated with TMT using hypofractionated IMRT (50 Gy in 20 fractions) with concomitant weekly radiosensitizing chemotherapy. Eligibility criteria were as follows: age ≥70 years, a proven diagnosis of muscle-invasive transitional cell bladder carcinoma, stage T2-T3N0M0 disease, and receipt of TMT with curative intent. Response rate was assessed by cystoscopic evaluation and bladder biopsy. Results: 24 patients with a median age of 79 years were eligible.more » A complete response was confirmed in 83% of the patients. Of the remaining patients, 1 of them underwent salvage cystectomy, and no disease was found in the bladder on histopathologic assessment. After a median follow-up time of 28 months, of the patients with a complete response, 2 patients had muscle-invasive recurrence, 1 experienced locoregional failure, and 3 experienced distant metastasis. The overall and cancer-specific survival rates at 3 years were 61% and 71%, respectively. Of the surviving patients, 75% have a disease-free and functioning bladder. All patients completed hypofractionated IMRT, and 19 patients tolerated all 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Acute grade 3 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities occurred in only 4% of the patients, and acute grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities, liver toxicities, or both were experienced by 17% of the cohort. No patient experienced grade 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Hypofractionated IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy appears to be an effective and well-tolerated curative treatment strategy in the elderly population and should be considered for patients who are not candidates for cystectomy or who wish to avoid cystectomy.« less
  • Purpose: Image guided adaptive radiation therapy offers individualized solutions to improve target coverage and reduce normal tissue irradiation, allowing the opportunity to increase the radiation tumor dose and spare normal bladder tissue. Methods and Materials: A library of 3 intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created (small, medium, and large) from planning computed tomography (CT) scans performed at 30 and 60 minutes; treating the whole bladder to 52 Gy and the tumor to 70 Gy in 32 fractions. A “plan of the day” approach was used for treatment delivery. A post-treatment cone beam CT (CBCT) scan was acquired weekly to assess intrafraction fillingmore » and coverage. Results: A total of 18 patients completed treatment to 70 Gy. The plan and treatment for 1 patient was to 68 Gy. Also, 1 patient's plan was to 70 Gy but the patient was treated to a total dose of 65.6 Gy because dose-limiting toxicity occurred before dose escalation. A total of 734 CBCT scans were evaluated. Small, medium, and large plans were used in 36%, 48%, and 16% of cases, respectively. The mean ± standard deviation rate of intrafraction filling at the start of treatment (ie, week 1) was 4.0 ± 4.8 mL/min (range 0.1-19.4) and at end of radiation therapy (ie, week 5 or 6) was 1.1 ± 1.6 mL/min (range 0.01-7.5; P=.002). The mean D{sub 98} (dose received by 98% volume) of the tumor boost and bladder as assessed on the post-treatment CBCT scan was 97.07% ± 2.10% (range 89.0%-104%) and 99.97% ± 2.62% (range 96.4%-112.0%). At a median follow-up period of 19 months (range 4-33), no muscle-invasive recurrences had developed. Two patients experienced late toxicity (both grade 3 cystitis) at 5.3 months (now resolved) and 18 months after radiation therapy. Conclusions: Image guided adaptive radiation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy to deliver a simultaneous integrated tumor boost to 70 Gy is feasible, with acceptable toxicity, and will be evaluated in a randomized trial.« less