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Title: The Drosophila DOCK family protein Sponge is required for development of the air sac primordium

Abstract

Dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) family genes are known as DOCK1-DOCK11 in mammals. DOCK family proteins mainly regulate actin filament polymerization and/or depolymerization and are GEF proteins, which contribute to cellular signaling events by activating small G proteins. Sponge (Spg) is a Drosophila counterpart to mammalian DOCK3/DOCK4, and plays a role in embryonic central nervous system development, R7 photoreceptor cell differentiation, and adult thorax development. In order to conduct further functional analyses on Spg in vivo, we examined its localization in third instar larval wing imaginal discs. Immunostaining with purified anti-Spg IgG revealed that Spg mainly localized in the air sac primordium (ASP) in wing imaginal discs. Spg is therefore predicted to play an important role in the ASP. The specific knockdown of Spg by the breathless-GAL4 driver in tracheal cells induced lethality accompanied with a defect in ASP development and the induction of apoptosis. The monitoring of ERK signaling activity in wing imaginal discs by immunostaining with anti-diphospho-ERK IgG revealed reductions in the ERK signal cascade in Spg knockdown clones. Furthermore, the overexpression of D-raf suppressed defects in survival and the proliferation of cells in the ASP induced by the knockdown of Spg. Collectively, these results indicate that Spg playsmore » a critical role in ASP development and tracheal cell viability that is mediated by the ERK signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Spg mainly localizes in the air sac primordium in wing imaginal discs. • Spg plays a critical role in air sac primordium development. • Spg positively regulates the ERK signal cascade.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649855
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Experimental Cell Research; Journal Volume: 354; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ACTIN; AMINO ACIDS; APOPTOSIS; CELL DIFFERENTIATION; CELL PROLIFERATION; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; CHEST; DEPOLYMERIZATION; DROSOPHILA; GROWTH FACTORS; GTP-ASES; GUANINE; IN VIVO; LARVAE; MAMMALS; MYOBLASTS; PH VALUE; PHOSPHOTRANSFERASES; POLYMERIZATION; RECEPTORS; SIGNALS

Citation Formats

Morishita, Kazushge, Anh Suong, Dang Ngoc, Yoshida, Hideki, and Yamaguchi, Masamitsu, E-mail: myamaguc@kit.ac.jp. The Drosophila DOCK family protein Sponge is required for development of the air sac primordium. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2017.03.044.
Morishita, Kazushge, Anh Suong, Dang Ngoc, Yoshida, Hideki, & Yamaguchi, Masamitsu, E-mail: myamaguc@kit.ac.jp. The Drosophila DOCK family protein Sponge is required for development of the air sac primordium. United States. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2017.03.044.
Morishita, Kazushge, Anh Suong, Dang Ngoc, Yoshida, Hideki, and Yamaguchi, Masamitsu, E-mail: myamaguc@kit.ac.jp. Mon . "The Drosophila DOCK family protein Sponge is required for development of the air sac primordium". United States. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2017.03.044.
@article{osti_22649855,
title = {The Drosophila DOCK family protein Sponge is required for development of the air sac primordium},
author = {Morishita, Kazushge and Anh Suong, Dang Ngoc and Yoshida, Hideki and Yamaguchi, Masamitsu, E-mail: myamaguc@kit.ac.jp},
abstractNote = {Dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) family genes are known as DOCK1-DOCK11 in mammals. DOCK family proteins mainly regulate actin filament polymerization and/or depolymerization and are GEF proteins, which contribute to cellular signaling events by activating small G proteins. Sponge (Spg) is a Drosophila counterpart to mammalian DOCK3/DOCK4, and plays a role in embryonic central nervous system development, R7 photoreceptor cell differentiation, and adult thorax development. In order to conduct further functional analyses on Spg in vivo, we examined its localization in third instar larval wing imaginal discs. Immunostaining with purified anti-Spg IgG revealed that Spg mainly localized in the air sac primordium (ASP) in wing imaginal discs. Spg is therefore predicted to play an important role in the ASP. The specific knockdown of Spg by the breathless-GAL4 driver in tracheal cells induced lethality accompanied with a defect in ASP development and the induction of apoptosis. The monitoring of ERK signaling activity in wing imaginal discs by immunostaining with anti-diphospho-ERK IgG revealed reductions in the ERK signal cascade in Spg knockdown clones. Furthermore, the overexpression of D-raf suppressed defects in survival and the proliferation of cells in the ASP induced by the knockdown of Spg. Collectively, these results indicate that Spg plays a critical role in ASP development and tracheal cell viability that is mediated by the ERK signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Spg mainly localizes in the air sac primordium in wing imaginal discs. • Spg plays a critical role in air sac primordium development. • Spg positively regulates the ERK signal cascade.},
doi = {10.1016/J.YEXCR.2017.03.044},
journal = {Experimental Cell Research},
number = 2,
volume = 354,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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