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Title: MicroRNA-133 mediates cardiac diseases: Mechanisms and clinical implications

Abstract

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) belong to the family of small non-coding RNAs that mediate gene expression by post-transcriptional regulation. Increasing evidence have demonstrated that miR-133 is enriched in muscle tissues and myogenic cells, and its aberrant expression could induce the occurrence and development of cardiac disorders, such as cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, etc. In this review, we summarized the regulatory roles of miR-133 in cardiac disorders and the underlying mechanisms, which suggest that miR-133 may be a potential diagnostic and therapeutic tool for cardiac disorders. - Highlights: • miR-218 is frequently downregulated in multiple cancers. • miR-218 plays pivotal roles in carcinogenesis. • miR-218 mediates proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis, invasion, etc. • miR-218 mediates tumorigenesis and metastasis via multiple pathways.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Guangdong Key Laboratory for Research and Development of Natural Drugs, Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang 524023, Guangdong (China)
  2. Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong (China)
  3. School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649854
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Experimental Cell Research; Journal Volume: 354; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANIMAL TISSUES; APOPTOSIS; CARCINOGENESIS; CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES; CELL PROLIFERATION; GENES; HEART; HEART FAILURE; HYPERTROPHY; INDIUM 133; METASTASES; MUSCLES; NEOPLASMS; RNA

Citation Formats

Liu, Yi, Liang, Yan, Zhang, Jin-fang, and Fu, Wei-ming, E-mail: fuweiming76@smu.edu.cn. MicroRNA-133 mediates cardiac diseases: Mechanisms and clinical implications. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2017.03.037.
Liu, Yi, Liang, Yan, Zhang, Jin-fang, & Fu, Wei-ming, E-mail: fuweiming76@smu.edu.cn. MicroRNA-133 mediates cardiac diseases: Mechanisms and clinical implications. United States. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2017.03.037.
Liu, Yi, Liang, Yan, Zhang, Jin-fang, and Fu, Wei-ming, E-mail: fuweiming76@smu.edu.cn. 2017. "MicroRNA-133 mediates cardiac diseases: Mechanisms and clinical implications". United States. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2017.03.037.
@article{osti_22649854,
title = {MicroRNA-133 mediates cardiac diseases: Mechanisms and clinical implications},
author = {Liu, Yi and Liang, Yan and Zhang, Jin-fang and Fu, Wei-ming, E-mail: fuweiming76@smu.edu.cn},
abstractNote = {MicroRNAs (miRNAs) belong to the family of small non-coding RNAs that mediate gene expression by post-transcriptional regulation. Increasing evidence have demonstrated that miR-133 is enriched in muscle tissues and myogenic cells, and its aberrant expression could induce the occurrence and development of cardiac disorders, such as cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, etc. In this review, we summarized the regulatory roles of miR-133 in cardiac disorders and the underlying mechanisms, which suggest that miR-133 may be a potential diagnostic and therapeutic tool for cardiac disorders. - Highlights: • miR-218 is frequently downregulated in multiple cancers. • miR-218 plays pivotal roles in carcinogenesis. • miR-218 mediates proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis, invasion, etc. • miR-218 mediates tumorigenesis and metastasis via multiple pathways.},
doi = {10.1016/J.YEXCR.2017.03.037},
journal = {Experimental Cell Research},
number = 2,
volume = 354,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}
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