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Title: Optical transparency of graphene layers grown on metal surfaces

Abstract

It is shown that, in contradiction with the fundamental results obtained for free graphene, graphene films grown on the Rh(111) surface to thicknesses from one to ~(12–15) single layers do not absorb visible electromagnetic radiation emitted from the surface and influence neither the brightness nor true temperature of the sample. At larger thicknesses, such absorption occurs. This effect is observed for the surfaces of other metals, specifically, Pt(111), Re(1010), and Ni(111) and, thus, can be considered as being universal. It is thought that the effect is due to changes in the electronic properties of thin graphene layers because of electron transfer between graphene and the metal substrate.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [1]
  1. Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)
  2. State University of Aerospace Instrumentation (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649587
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Semiconductors; Journal Volume: 51; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ABSORPTION; BRIGHTNESS; CRYSTAL GROWTH; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ELECTRON TRANSFER; GRAPHENE; LAYERS; NICKEL; OPACITY; PLATINUM; RHENIUM; RHODIUM; SUBSTRATES; SURFACES; THIN FILMS

Citation Formats

Rut’kov, E. V., Lavrovskaya, N. P., Sheshenya, E. S., E-mail: sheshenayket@gmail.ru, and Gall, N. R.. Optical transparency of graphene layers grown on metal surfaces. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063782617040182.
Rut’kov, E. V., Lavrovskaya, N. P., Sheshenya, E. S., E-mail: sheshenayket@gmail.ru, & Gall, N. R.. Optical transparency of graphene layers grown on metal surfaces. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063782617040182.
Rut’kov, E. V., Lavrovskaya, N. P., Sheshenya, E. S., E-mail: sheshenayket@gmail.ru, and Gall, N. R.. Sat . "Optical transparency of graphene layers grown on metal surfaces". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063782617040182.
@article{osti_22649587,
title = {Optical transparency of graphene layers grown on metal surfaces},
author = {Rut’kov, E. V. and Lavrovskaya, N. P. and Sheshenya, E. S., E-mail: sheshenayket@gmail.ru and Gall, N. R.},
abstractNote = {It is shown that, in contradiction with the fundamental results obtained for free graphene, graphene films grown on the Rh(111) surface to thicknesses from one to ~(12–15) single layers do not absorb visible electromagnetic radiation emitted from the surface and influence neither the brightness nor true temperature of the sample. At larger thicknesses, such absorption occurs. This effect is observed for the surfaces of other metals, specifically, Pt(111), Re(1010), and Ni(111) and, thus, can be considered as being universal. It is thought that the effect is due to changes in the electronic properties of thin graphene layers because of electron transfer between graphene and the metal substrate.},
doi = {10.1134/S1063782617040182},
journal = {Semiconductors},
number = 4,
volume = 51,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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