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Title: MO-DE-209-02: Tomosynthesis Reconstruction Methods

Abstract

Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly replacing mammography as the standard of care in breast cancer screening and diagnosis. DBT is a form of computed tomography, in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into tomographic data. The angular range varies from 15° to 50° and the number of projections varies between 9 and 25 projections, as determined by the equipment manufacturer. It is equally valid to treat DBT as the digital analog of classical tomography – that is, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” stands for “synthetic tomography.” DBT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DBT systems is a hybrid between computed tomography and classical tomographic methods. In this lecture, we will explore the continuum from radiography to computed tomography to illustrate the characteristics of DBT. This lecture will consist of four presentations that will provide a complete overview of DBT, including a review of the fundamentals of DBT acquisition, a discussion of DBT reconstruction methods, an overview of dosimetry for DBT systems, and summary of the underlying image theorymore » of DBT thereby relating image quality and dose. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis image acquisition. To understand the fundamentals of tomosynthesis image reconstruction. To learn the determinants of image quality and dose in DBT, including measurement techniques. To learn the image theory underlying tomosynthesis, and the relationship between dose and image quality. ADM is a consultant to, and holds stock in, Real Time Tomography, LLC. ADM receives research support from Hologic Inc., Analogic Inc., and Barco NV.; ADM is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Gamma Medica Inc.; A. Maidment, Research Support, Hologic, Inc.; Research Support, Barco, Inc.; Scientific Advisory Board, Gamma Medica, Inc.; Scientific Advisory Board, Real-Time Tomography, LLC.; Shareholder, Real-Time Tomography, LLC; J. Mainprize, Our lab has a research agreement with GE Healthcare on various topics in digital mammography and digital tomosynthesis; W. Zhao, Research grant from Siemens Health Care.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649562
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IMAGE PROCESSING; LEARNING; MAMMARY GLANDS; RADIATION DOSES

Citation Formats

Mainprize, J. MO-DE-209-02: Tomosynthesis Reconstruction Methods. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957248.
Mainprize, J. MO-DE-209-02: Tomosynthesis Reconstruction Methods. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957248.
Mainprize, J. 2016. "MO-DE-209-02: Tomosynthesis Reconstruction Methods". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957248.
@article{osti_22649562,
title = {MO-DE-209-02: Tomosynthesis Reconstruction Methods},
author = {Mainprize, J.},
abstractNote = {Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly replacing mammography as the standard of care in breast cancer screening and diagnosis. DBT is a form of computed tomography, in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into tomographic data. The angular range varies from 15° to 50° and the number of projections varies between 9 and 25 projections, as determined by the equipment manufacturer. It is equally valid to treat DBT as the digital analog of classical tomography – that is, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” stands for “synthetic tomography.” DBT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DBT systems is a hybrid between computed tomography and classical tomographic methods. In this lecture, we will explore the continuum from radiography to computed tomography to illustrate the characteristics of DBT. This lecture will consist of four presentations that will provide a complete overview of DBT, including a review of the fundamentals of DBT acquisition, a discussion of DBT reconstruction methods, an overview of dosimetry for DBT systems, and summary of the underlying image theory of DBT thereby relating image quality and dose. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis image acquisition. To understand the fundamentals of tomosynthesis image reconstruction. To learn the determinants of image quality and dose in DBT, including measurement techniques. To learn the image theory underlying tomosynthesis, and the relationship between dose and image quality. ADM is a consultant to, and holds stock in, Real Time Tomography, LLC. ADM receives research support from Hologic Inc., Analogic Inc., and Barco NV.; ADM is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Gamma Medica Inc.; A. Maidment, Research Support, Hologic, Inc.; Research Support, Barco, Inc.; Scientific Advisory Board, Gamma Medica, Inc.; Scientific Advisory Board, Real-Time Tomography, LLC.; Shareholder, Real-Time Tomography, LLC; J. Mainprize, Our lab has a research agreement with GE Healthcare on various topics in digital mammography and digital tomosynthesis; W. Zhao, Research grant from Siemens Health Care.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957248},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Digital tomosynthesis mammography (DTM) is a promising new modality for breast cancer detection. In DTM, projection-view images are acquired at a limited number of angles over a limited angular range and the imaged volume is reconstructed from the two-dimensional projections, thus providing three-dimensional structural information of the breast tissue. In this work, we investigated three representative reconstruction methods for this limited-angle cone-beam tomographic problem, including the backprojection (BP) method, the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) and the maximum likelihood method with the convex algorithm (ML-convex). The SART and ML-convex methods were both initialized with BP results to achieve efficient reconstruction.more » A second generation GE prototype tomosynthesis mammography system with a stationary digital detector was used for image acquisition. Projection-view images were acquired from 21 angles in 3 deg. increments over a {+-}30 deg. angular range. We used an American College of Radiology phantom and designed three additional phantoms to evaluate the image quality and reconstruction artifacts. In addition to visual comparison of the reconstructed images of different phantom sets, we employed the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), a line profile of features, an artifact spread function (ASF), a relative noise power spectrum (NPS), and a line object spread function (LOSF) to quantitatively evaluate the reconstruction results. It was found that for the phantoms with homogeneous background, the BP method resulted in less noisy tomosynthesized images and higher CNR values for masses than the SART and ML-convex methods. However, the two iterative methods provided greater contrast enhancement for both masses and calcification, sharper LOSF, and reduced interplane blurring and artifacts with better ASF behaviors for masses. For a contrast-detail phantom with heterogeneous tissue-mimicking background, the BP method had strong blurring artifacts along the x-ray source motion direction that obscured the contrast-detail objects, while the other two methods can remove the superimposed breast structures and significantly improve object conspicuity. With a properly selected relaxation parameter, the SART method with one iteration can provide tomosynthesized images comparable to those obtained from the ML-convex method with seven iterations, when BP results were used as initialization for both methods.« less
  • Digital tomosynthesis is an imaging technique to produce a tomographic image from a series of angular digital images in a manner similar to conventional focal plane tomography. Unlike film focal plane tomography, the acquisition of the data in a C-arm geometry causes the image receptor to be positioned at various angles to the reconstruction tomogram. The digital nature of the data allows for input images to be combined into the desired plane with the flexibility of generating tomograms of many separate planes from a single set of input data. Angular datasets were obtained of a low contrast detectability (LCD) phantommore » and cadaver breast utilizing a Lorad stereotactic biopsy unit with a coupled source and digital detector in a C-arm configuration. Datasets of 9 and 41 low-dose projections were collected over a 30 deg. angular range. Tomographic images were reconstructed using a Backprojection (BP) algorithm, an Iterative Subtraction (IS) algorithm that allows the partial subtraction of out-of-focus planes, and an Algebraic Reconstruction (AR) algorithm. These were compared with single view digital radiographs. The methods' effectiveness at enhancing visibility of an obscured LCD phantom was quantified in terms of the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), and Signal to Background Ratio (SBR), all normalized to the metric value for the single projection image. The methods' effectiveness at removing ghosting artifacts in a cadaver breast was quantified in terms of the Artifact Spread Function (ASF). The technology proved effective at partially removing out of focus structures and enhancing SNR and SBR. The normalized SNR was highest at 4.85 for the obscured LCD phantom, using nine projections and IS algorithm. The normalized SBR was highest at 23.2 for the obscured LCD phantom, using 41 projections and an AR algorithm. The highest normalized metric values occurred with the obscured phantom. This supports the assertion that the greatest value of tomosynthesis is in imaging fibroglandular breasts. The ASF performance was best with the AR technique and nine projections.« less
  • Digital tomosynthesis mammography (DTM) is one of the most promising techniques that can potentially improve early detection of breast cancers. DTM can provide three-dimensional (3D) structural information by reconstructing the whole imaged volume from a sequence of projection-view (PV) mammograms that are acquired at a small number of projection angles over a limited angular range. Our previous study showed that simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) can produce satisfactory tomosynthesized image quality compared to maximum likelihood-type algorithms. To improve the efficiency of DTM reconstruction and address the problem of boundary artifacts, we have developed methods to incorporate both two-dimensional (2D) andmore » 3D breast boundary information within the SART reconstruction algorithm in this study. A second generation GE prototype tomosynthesis mammography system with a stationary digital detector was used for PV image acquisition from 21 angles in 3 deg. increments over a {+-}30 deg. angular range. The 2D breast boundary curves on all PV images were obtained by automated segmentation and were used to restrict the SART reconstruction to be performed only within the breast volume. The computation time of SART reconstruction was reduced by 76.3% and 69.9% for cranio-caudal and mediolateral oblique views, respectively, for the chosen example. In addition, a 3D conical trimming method was developed in which the 2D breast boundary curves from all PVs were back projected to generate the 3D breast surface. This 3D surface was then used to eliminate the multiple breast shadows outside the breast volume due to reconstruction by setting these voxels to a constant background value. Our study demonstrates that, by using the 2D and 3D breast boundary information, all breast boundary and most detector boundary artifacts can be effectively removed on all tomosynthesized slices.« less
  • The successful implementation of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) for on-board image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) requires fast DTS image reconstruction. Both target and reference DTS image sets are required to support an image registration application for IGRT. Target images are usually DTS image sets reconstructed from on-board projections, which can be accomplished quickly using the conventional filtered backprojection algorithm. Reference images are DTS image sets reconstructed from digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) previously generated from conventional planning CT data. Generating a set of DRRs from planning CT is relatively slow using the conventional ray-casting algorithm. In order to facilitate DTS reconstruction withinmore » a clinically acceptable period of time, we implemented a high performance DRR reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit of commercial PC graphics hardware. The performance of this new algorithm was evaluated and compared with that which is achieved using the conventional software-based ray-casting algorithm. DTS images were reconstructed from DRRs previously generated by both hardware and software algorithms. On average, the DRR reconstruction efficiency using the hardware method is improved by a factor of 67 over the software method. The image quality of the DRRs was comparable to those generated using the software-based ray-casting algorithm. Accelerated DRR reconstruction significantly reduces the overall time required to produce a set of reference DTS images from planning CT and makes this technique clinically practical for target localization for radiation therapy.« less
  • Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a method to reconstruct pseudo three-dimensional (3D) volume images from two-dimensional x-ray projections acquired over limited scan angles. Compared with cone-beam computed tomography, which is frequently used for 3D image guided radiation therapy, DTS requires less imaging time and dose. Successful implementation of DTS for fast target localization requires the reconstruction process to be accomplished within tight clinical time constraints (usually within 2 min). To achieve this goal, substantial improvement of reconstruction efficiency is necessary. In this study, a reconstruction process based upon the algorithm proposed by Feldkamp, Davis, and Kress was implemented on graphics hardwaremore » for the purpose of acceleration. The performance of the novel reconstruction implementation was tested for phantom and real patient cases. The efficiency of DTS reconstruction was improved by a factor of 13 on average, without compromising image quality. With acceleration of the reconstruction algorithm, the whole DTS generation process including data preprocessing, reconstruction, and DICOM conversion is accomplished within 1.5 min, which ultimately meets clinical requirement for on-line target localization.« less