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Title: MO-DE-202-04: Multimodality Image-Guided Surgery and Intervention: For the Rest of Us

Abstract

At least three major trends in surgical intervention have emerged over the last decade: a move toward more minimally invasive (or non-invasive) approach to the surgical target; the development of high-precision treatment delivery techniques; and the increasing role of multi-modality intraoperative imaging in support of such procedures. This symposium includes invited presentations on recent advances in each of these areas and the emerging role for medical physics research in the development and translation of high-precision interventional techniques. The four speakers are: Keyvan Farahani, “Image-guided focused ultrasound surgery and therapy” Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen, “Advances in image registration and reconstruction for image-guided neurosurgery” Tina Kapur, “Image-guided surgery and interventions in the advanced multimodality image-guided operating (AMIGO) suite” Raj Shekhar, “Multimodality image-guided interventions: Multimodality for the rest of us” Learning Objectives: Understand the principles and applications of HIFU in surgical ablation. Learn about recent advances in 3D–2D and 3D deformable image registration in support of surgical safety and precision. Learn about recent advances in model-based 3D image reconstruction in application to intraoperative 3D imaging. Understand the multi-modality imaging technologies and clinical applications investigated in the AMIGO suite. Understand the emerging need and techniques to implement multi-modality image guidance in surgical applications such asmore » neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology. Research supported by the NIH and Siemens Healthcare.; J. Siewerdsen; Grant Support - National Institutes of Health; Grant Support - Siemens Healthcare; Grant Support - Carestream Health; Advisory Board - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Elekta Oncology.; T. Kapur, P41EB015898; R. Shekhar, Funding: R42CA137886 and R41CA192504 Disclosure and CoI: IGI Technologies, small-business partner on the grants.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Children’s National Health System (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649544
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; FINANCING; IMAGE PROCESSING; LEARNING; SURGERY

Citation Formats

Shekhar, R. MO-DE-202-04: Multimodality Image-Guided Surgery and Intervention: For the Rest of Us. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957228.
Shekhar, R. MO-DE-202-04: Multimodality Image-Guided Surgery and Intervention: For the Rest of Us. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957228.
Shekhar, R. 2016. "MO-DE-202-04: Multimodality Image-Guided Surgery and Intervention: For the Rest of Us". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957228.
@article{osti_22649544,
title = {MO-DE-202-04: Multimodality Image-Guided Surgery and Intervention: For the Rest of Us},
author = {Shekhar, R.},
abstractNote = {At least three major trends in surgical intervention have emerged over the last decade: a move toward more minimally invasive (or non-invasive) approach to the surgical target; the development of high-precision treatment delivery techniques; and the increasing role of multi-modality intraoperative imaging in support of such procedures. This symposium includes invited presentations on recent advances in each of these areas and the emerging role for medical physics research in the development and translation of high-precision interventional techniques. The four speakers are: Keyvan Farahani, “Image-guided focused ultrasound surgery and therapy” Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen, “Advances in image registration and reconstruction for image-guided neurosurgery” Tina Kapur, “Image-guided surgery and interventions in the advanced multimodality image-guided operating (AMIGO) suite” Raj Shekhar, “Multimodality image-guided interventions: Multimodality for the rest of us” Learning Objectives: Understand the principles and applications of HIFU in surgical ablation. Learn about recent advances in 3D–2D and 3D deformable image registration in support of surgical safety and precision. Learn about recent advances in model-based 3D image reconstruction in application to intraoperative 3D imaging. Understand the multi-modality imaging technologies and clinical applications investigated in the AMIGO suite. Understand the emerging need and techniques to implement multi-modality image guidance in surgical applications such as neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology. Research supported by the NIH and Siemens Healthcare.; J. Siewerdsen; Grant Support - National Institutes of Health; Grant Support - Siemens Healthcare; Grant Support - Carestream Health; Advisory Board - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Elekta Oncology.; T. Kapur, P41EB015898; R. Shekhar, Funding: R42CA137886 and R41CA192504 Disclosure and CoI: IGI Technologies, small-business partner on the grants.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957228},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • At least three major trends in surgical intervention have emerged over the last decade: a move toward more minimally invasive (or non-invasive) approach to the surgical target; the development of high-precision treatment delivery techniques; and the increasing role of multi-modality intraoperative imaging in support of such procedures. This symposium includes invited presentations on recent advances in each of these areas and the emerging role for medical physics research in the development and translation of high-precision interventional techniques. The four speakers are: Keyvan Farahani, “Image-guided focused ultrasound surgery and therapy” Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen, “Advances in image registration and reconstruction for image-guidedmore » neurosurgery” Tina Kapur, “Image-guided surgery and interventions in the advanced multimodality image-guided operating (AMIGO) suite” Raj Shekhar, “Multimodality image-guided interventions: Multimodality for the rest of us” Learning Objectives: Understand the principles and applications of HIFU in surgical ablation. Learn about recent advances in 3D–2D and 3D deformable image registration in support of surgical safety and precision. Learn about recent advances in model-based 3D image reconstruction in application to intraoperative 3D imaging. Understand the multi-modality imaging technologies and clinical applications investigated in the AMIGO suite. Understand the emerging need and techniques to implement multi-modality image guidance in surgical applications such as neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology. Research supported by the NIH and Siemens Healthcare.; J. Siewerdsen; Grant Support - National Institutes of Health; Grant Support - Siemens Healthcare; Grant Support - Carestream Health; Advisory Board - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Elekta Oncology.; T. Kapur, P41EB015898; R. Shekhar, Funding: R42CA137886 and R41CA192504 Disclosure and CoI: IGI Technologies, small-business partner on the grants.« less
  • Personalized therapies play an increasingly critical role in cancer care: Image guidance with multimodality image fusion facilitates the targeting of specific tissue for tissue characterization and plays a role in drug discovery and optimization of tailored therapies. Positron-emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) may offer additional information not otherwise available to the operator during minimally invasive image-guided procedures, such as biopsy and ablation. With use of multimodality image fusion for image-guided interventions, navigation with advanced modalities does not require the physical presence of the PET, MRI, or CT imaging system. Several commercially available methodsmore » of image-fusion and device navigation are reviewed along with an explanation of common tracking hardware and software. An overview of current clinical applications for multimodality navigation is provided.« less
  • There is a need for frameless guidance systems to help surgeons plan the exact location for incisions, to define the margins of tumors, and to precisely identify locations of neighboring critical structures. The authors have developed an automatic technique for registering clinical data, such as segmented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) reconstructions, with any view of the patient on the operating table. They demonstrate on the specific example of neurosurgery. The method enables a visual mix of live video of the patient and the segmented three-dimensional (3-D) MRI or CT model. This supports enhanced reality techniques formore » planning and guiding neurosurgical procedures and allows them to interactively view extracranial or intracranial structures nonintrusively. Extensions of the method include image guided biopsies, focused therapeutic procedures, and clinical studies involving change detection over time sequences of images.« less
  • Purpose: A promising patient positioning technique is based on registering computed tomographic (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) images to cone-beam CT images (CBCT). The extra radiation dose delivered to the patient can be substantially reduced by using fewer projections. This approach results in lower quality CBCT images. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a number of similarity measures (SMs) suitable for registration of CT or MR images to low-quality CBCTs. Methods and Materials: Using the recently proposed evaluation protocol, we evaluated nine SMs with respect to pretreatment imaging modalities, number of two-dimensional (2D) images used for reconstruction, andmore » number of reconstruction iterations. The image database consisted of 100 X-ray and corresponding CT and MR images of two vertebral columns. Results: Using a higher number of 2D projections or reconstruction iterations results in higher accuracy and slightly lower robustness. The similarity measures that behaved the best also yielded the best registration results. The most appropriate similarity measure was the asymmetric multi-feature mutual information (AMMI). Conclusions: The evaluation protocol proved to be a valuable tool for selecting the best similarity measure for the reconstruction-based registration. The results indicate that accurate and robust CT/CBCT or even MR/CBCT registrations are possible if the AMMI similarity measure is used.« less
  • The image quality and localization accuracy for C-arm tomosynthesis and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance of head and neck surgery were investigated. A continuum in image acquisition was explored, ranging from a single exposure (radiograph) to multiple projections acquired over a limited arc (tomosynthesis) to a full semicircular trajectory (CBCT). Experiments were performed using a prototype mobile C-arm modified to perform 3D image acquisition (a modified Siemens PowerMobil). The tradeoffs in image quality associated with the extent of the source-detector arc ({theta}{sub tot}), the number of projection views, and the total imaging dose were evaluated in phantom and cadaver studies.more » Surgical localization performance was evaluated using three cadaver heads imaged as a function of {theta}{sub tot}. Six localization tasks were considered, ranging from high-contrast feature identification (e.g., tip of a K-wire pointer) to more challenging soft-tissue delineation (e.g., junction of the hard and soft palate). Five head and neck surgeons and one radiologist participated as observers. For each localization task, the 3D coordinates of landmarks pinpointed by each observer were analyzed as a function of {theta}{sub tot}. For all tomosynthesis angles, image quality was highest in the coronal plane, whereas sagittal and axial planes exhibited a substantial decrease in spatial resolution associated with out-of-plane blur and distortion. Tasks involving complex, lower-contrast features demonstrated steeper degradation with smaller tomosynthetic arc. Localization accuracy in the coronal plane was correspondingly high, maintained to <3 mm down to {theta}{sub tot}{approx}30 deg. , whereas sagittal and axial localization degraded rapidly below {theta}{sub tot}{approx}60 deg. . Similarly, localization precision was better than {approx}1 mm within the coronal plane, compared to {approx}2-3 mm out-of-plane for tomosynthesis angles below {theta}{sub tot}{approx}45 deg. . An overall 3D localization accuracy of {approx}2.5 mm was achieved with {theta}{sub tot}{approx} 90 deg. for most tasks. The high in-plane spatial resolution, short scanning time, and low radiation dose characteristic of tomosynthesis may enable the surgeon to collect near real-time images throughout the procedure with minimal interference to surgical workflow. Therefore, tomosynthesis could provide a useful addition to the image-guided surgery arsenal, providing on-demand, high quality image updates, complemented by CBCT at critical milestones in the surgical procedure.« less