skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: MO-B-BRC-00: Prostate HDR Treatment Planning - Considering Different Imaging Modalities

Abstract

Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modalitymore » Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.« less

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649508
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BRACHYTHERAPY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DOSE RATES; IMAGES; MAGNETIC RESONANCE; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PLANNING; PROSTATE; RADIATION SOURCES

Citation Formats

NONE. MO-B-BRC-00: Prostate HDR Treatment Planning - Considering Different Imaging Modalities. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957179.
NONE. MO-B-BRC-00: Prostate HDR Treatment Planning - Considering Different Imaging Modalities. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957179.
NONE. 2016. "MO-B-BRC-00: Prostate HDR Treatment Planning - Considering Different Imaging Modalities". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957179.
@article{osti_22649508,
title = {MO-B-BRC-00: Prostate HDR Treatment Planning - Considering Different Imaging Modalities},
author = {NONE},
abstractNote = {Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957179},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Precise localization of prostate cancer and the drainage lymph nodes is mandatory to define an accurate clinical target volume for conformal radiotherapy. Better target definition and delineation on a daily basis is surely important in quality assurance for fractionated radiation therapy. This article reviews the evidence for major emerging techniques that show promise in better identifying the clinical target volume. Partial prostate boost by brachytherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, or protons has become possible not only with standard imaging techniques but also with the availability of metabolic images obtained by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Even though fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emissionmore » tomography has not been found to be useful, novel radiolabeled tracers may eventually prove of value in the diagnosis and treatment planning of prostate cancer. For the metastatic lymph nodes, lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles has greater accuracy as compared with conventional techniques and has been instrumental in delineating the lymphatic drainage of the prostate gland. These novel investigational techniques could further help in optimizing conformal radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer. The concepts of biologic target volume, real target volume, and multidimensional conformal radiotherapy are being explored.« less
  • Malignant gliomas present one of the most difficult challenges to definitive radiation therapy, not only with respect to local control, but also with respect to clinical functional status. While tumor target volume definitions for malignant gliomas are often based on CT and conventional MRI, the functional imaging modalities, echo planar rCBV (regional cerebral blood volume mapping) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET, are more sensitive modalities for the detection of neovascularization, perhaps one of the earliest signs of glial tumor initiation and progression. In order to address the clinical utility of functional imaging in radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning, we compared tumor targetmore » volume definitions and overall dosimetry in patients either undergoing co-registration of conventional Gadolinium-enhanced MRI, or co-registration of functional imaging modalities, prior to radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning.« less
  • Purpose: To compare IMRT planning strategies for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses.Methods: All plans were generated fully automatically (i.e., no human trial-and-error interactions) using iCycle, the authors' in-house developed algorithm for multicriterial selection of beam angles and optimization of fluence profiles, allowing objective comparison of planning strategies. For 18 prostate cancer patients (eight with bilateral hip prostheses, ten with a right-sided unilateral prosthesis), two planning strategies were evaluated: (i) full exclusion of beams containing beamlets that would deliver dose to the target after passing a prosthesis (IMRT{sub remove}) and (ii) exclusion of those beamlets only (IMRT{sub cut}). Plansmore » with optimized coplanar and noncoplanar beam arrangements were generated. Differences in PTV coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) were quantified. The impact of beam number on plan quality was evaluated.Results: Especially for patients with bilateral hip prostheses, IMRT{sub cut} significantly improved rectum and bladder sparing compared to IMRT{sub remove}. For 9-beam coplanar plans, rectum V{sub 60Gy} reduced by 17.5%{+-} 15.0% (maximum 37.4%, p= 0.036) and rectum D{sub mean} by 9.4%{+-} 7.8% (maximum 19.8%, p= 0.036). Further improvements in OAR sparing were achievable by using noncoplanar beam setups, reducing rectum V{sub 60Gy} by another 4.6%{+-} 4.9% (p= 0.012) for noncoplanar 9-beam IMRT{sub cut} plans. Large reductions in rectum dose delivery were also observed when increasing the number of beam directions in the plans. For bilateral implants, the rectum V{sub 60Gy} was 37.3%{+-} 12.1% for coplanar 7-beam plans and reduced on average by 13.5% (maximum 30.1%, p= 0.012) for 15 directions.Conclusions: iCycle was able to automatically generate high quality plans for prostate cancer patients with prostheses. Excluding only beamlets that passed through the prostheses (IMRT{sub cut} strategy) significantly improved OAR sparing. Noncoplanar beam arrangements and, to a larger extent, increasing the number of treatment beams further improved plan quality.« less
  • Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population,more » and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean {+-} standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 {+-} 0.12, 0.70 {+-} 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 {+-} 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 {+-} 0.16 for the rectum. Conclusions: The electron-density atlas method provides the ability to automatically define organs and map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for radiotherapy dose planning and DRR generation. This method provides the necessary tools for MRI-alone treatment planning and adaptive MRI-based prostate radiation therapy.« less
  • Total radiation (4500 rad) and cyclophosphamide doses (450 mg/kg or 2.7 g/m2) were held constant over a 24-day period in rat hepatoma 3924A using radiation schedules in which 1500 rad were given over a 1- to 2-day period in 1-8 fractions, repeated at 11-day intervals, with or without cyclophosphamide. Reducing the rad per fraction resulted in a reduced incidence of complete tumor response and tumor cures, and a reduction in the magnitude of skin response. Cure rates were 40, 10, 0, and 0%, respectively, for the 1500, 750, 500, and 250 rad per fraction groups without cyclophosphamide. When the 1500,more » 750, 500, 375, 250, and 188 rad per fraction groups were given 150 mg/kg cyclophosphamide day 1 after radiation, major increases occurred in tumor cures, with the cure rates being 80, 80, 80, 70, 60, and 50%, respectively. The addition of cyclophosphamide did not significantly alter skin reaction to radiation. The higher rad per fraction schedules were more effective in controlling metastatic dissemination when radiation was used alone. The addition of cyclophosphamide markedly reduced metastatic dissemination in both high and low-dose per fraction schedules. Optimal treatment levels were estimated from analysis of fitted response surfaces, and the quantitative interrelationship between normal tissue reaction, probability of tumor cure, and associated relative hazard to the host estimated from the results of these analytical methods. Hyperfractionated radiation dose schedules with dose/fraction in the clinical range combined with cyclophosphamide can significantly increase the therapeutic ratio and prevent metastatic dissemination compared with radiation alone as a result of the increased effectiveness of combined modality therapy on the tumor, without a concomitant increase in normal tissue reaction.« less