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Title: MO-A-BRB-01: TG191: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters

Abstract

This presentation will highlight the upcoming TG-191 report: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters. Luminescent dosimetry based on TLD and OSLD is a practical, accurate, and precise technique for point dosimetry in medical physics applications. The charges of Task Group 191 were to detail the methodologies for practical and optimal luminescent dosimetry in a clinical setting. This includes (1) To review the variety of TLD/OSL materials available, including features and limitations of each. (2) To outline the optimal steps to achieve accurate and precise dosimetry with luminescent detectors and to evaluate the uncertainty induced when less rigorous procedures are used. (3) To develop consensus guidelines on the optimal use of luminescent dosimeters for clinical practice. (4) To develop guidelines for special medically relevant uses of TLDs/OSLs (e.g., mixed field i.e. photon/neutron dosimetry, particle beam dosimetry, skin dosimetry). While this report provides general guidelines for arbitrary TLD and OSLD processes, the report, and therefore this presentation, provide specific guidance for TLD-100 (LiF:Ti,Mg) and nanoDot (Al2O3:C) dosimeters because of their prevalence in clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Understand the available dosimetry systems, and basic theory of their operation Understand the range of dose determination methodologies and the uncertainties associated with them Become familiar withmore » special considerations for TLD/OSLD relevant for special clinical situations Learn recommended commissioning and QA procedures for these dosimetry systems.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649489
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; DOSEMETERS; LITHIUM FLUORIDES; LUMINESCENCE; QUANTUM DOTS; RECOMMENDATIONS

Citation Formats

Kry, S. MO-A-BRB-01: TG191: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957152.
Kry, S. MO-A-BRB-01: TG191: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957152.
Kry, S. 2016. "MO-A-BRB-01: TG191: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957152.
@article{osti_22649489,
title = {MO-A-BRB-01: TG191: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters},
author = {Kry, S.},
abstractNote = {This presentation will highlight the upcoming TG-191 report: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters. Luminescent dosimetry based on TLD and OSLD is a practical, accurate, and precise technique for point dosimetry in medical physics applications. The charges of Task Group 191 were to detail the methodologies for practical and optimal luminescent dosimetry in a clinical setting. This includes (1) To review the variety of TLD/OSL materials available, including features and limitations of each. (2) To outline the optimal steps to achieve accurate and precise dosimetry with luminescent detectors and to evaluate the uncertainty induced when less rigorous procedures are used. (3) To develop consensus guidelines on the optimal use of luminescent dosimeters for clinical practice. (4) To develop guidelines for special medically relevant uses of TLDs/OSLs (e.g., mixed field i.e. photon/neutron dosimetry, particle beam dosimetry, skin dosimetry). While this report provides general guidelines for arbitrary TLD and OSLD processes, the report, and therefore this presentation, provide specific guidance for TLD-100 (LiF:Ti,Mg) and nanoDot (Al2O3:C) dosimeters because of their prevalence in clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Understand the available dosimetry systems, and basic theory of their operation Understand the range of dose determination methodologies and the uncertainties associated with them Become familiar with special considerations for TLD/OSLD relevant for special clinical situations Learn recommended commissioning and QA procedures for these dosimetry systems.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957152},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters, OSLDs, are plastic disks infused with aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C). These disks are encased in a light-tight plastic holder. Crystals of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C when exposed to ionizing radiation store energy that is released as luminescence (420 nm) when the OSLD is illuminated with stimulation light (540 nm). The intensity of the luminescence depends on the dose absorbed by the OSLD and the intensity of the stimulation light. OSLDs used in this work were InLight/OSL Dot dosimeters, which were read with a MicroStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). The following are dosimetricmore » properties of the OSLD that were determined: After a single irradiation, repeated readings cause the signal to decrease by 0.05% per reading; the signal could be discharged by greater than 98% by illuminating them for more than 45 s with a 150 W tungsten-halogen light; after irradiation there was a transient signal that decayed with a 0.8 min halftime; after the transient signal decay the signal was stable for days; repeated irradiations and readings of an individual OSLD gave a signal with a coefficient of variation of 0.6%; the dose sensitivity of OSLDs from a batch of detectors has a coefficient of variation of 0.9%, response was linear with absorbed dose over a test range of 1-300 cGy; above 300 cGy a small supra-linear behavior occurs; there was no dose-per-pulse dependence over a 388-fold range; there was no dependence on radiation energy or mode for 6 and 15 MV x rays and 6-20 MeV electrons; for Ir-192 gamma rays OSLD had 6% higher sensitivity; the dose sensitivity was unchanged up to an accumulated dose of 20 Gy and thereafter decreased by 4% per 10 Gy of additional accumulated dose; dose sensitivity was not dependent on the angle of incidence of radiation; the OSLD in its light-tight case has an intrinsic buildup of 0.04 g/cm{sup 2}; dose sensitivity of the OSLD was not dependent on temperature at the time of irradiation in the range of 10-40 deg. C. The clinical use of OSLDs for in vivo dosimetric measurements is shown to be feasible.« less
  • This presentation will highlight the upcoming TG-191 report: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters. Luminescent dosimetry based on TLD and OSLD is a practical, accurate, and precise technique for point dosimetry in medical physics applications. The charges of Task Group 191 were to detail the methodologies for practical and optimal luminescent dosimetry in a clinical setting. This includes (1) To review the variety of TLD/OSL materials available, including features and limitations of each. (2) To outline the optimal steps to achieve accurate and precise dosimetry with luminescent detectors and to evaluate the uncertainty induced when less rigorous procedures are used. (3)more » To develop consensus guidelines on the optimal use of luminescent dosimeters for clinical practice. (4) To develop guidelines for special medically relevant uses of TLDs/OSLs (e.g., mixed field i.e. photon/neutron dosimetry, particle beam dosimetry, skin dosimetry). While this report provides general guidelines for arbitrary TLD and OSLD processes, the report, and therefore this presentation, provide specific guidance for TLD-100 (LiF:Ti,Mg) and nanoDot (Al2O3:C) dosimeters because of their prevalence in clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Understand the available dosimetry systems, and basic theory of their operation Understand the range of dose determination methodologies and the uncertainties associated with them Become familiar with special considerations for TLD/OSLD relevant for special clinical situations Learn recommended commissioning and QA procedures for these dosimetry systems.« less
  • The purpose of this work was to determine the relative sensitivity of skin QED diodes, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) (microStar Trade-Mark-Sign DOT, Landauer), and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a function of distance from a photon beam field edge when applied to measure dose at out-of-field points. These detectors have been used to estimate radiation dose to patients' implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) located outside the treatment field. The ICDs have a thin outer case made of 0.4- to 0.6-mm-thick titanium ({approx}2.4-mm tissue equivalent). A 5-mm bolus, being the equivalent depth of the devices under the patient's skin, was placed overmore » the ICDs. Response per unit absorbed dose-to-water was measured for each of the dosimeters with and without bolus on the beam central axis (CAX) and at a distance up to 20 cm from the CAX. Doses were measured with an ionization chamber at various depths for 6- and 15-MV x-rays on a Varian Clinac-iX linear accelerator. Relative sensitivity of the detectors was determined as the ratio of the sensitivity at each off-axis distance to that at the CAX. The detector sensitivity as a function of the distance from the field edge changed by {+-} 3% (1-11%) for LiF TLD-700, decreased by 10% (5-21%) for OSLD, and increased by 16% (11-19%) for the skin QED diode (Sun Nuclear Corp.) at the equivalent depth of 5 mm for 6- or 15-MV photon energies. Our results showed that the use of bolus with proper thickness (i.e., {approx}d{sub max} of the photon energy) on the top of the ICD would reduce the scattered dose to a lower level. Dosimeters should be calibrated out-of-field and preferably with bolus equal in thickness to the depth of interest. This can be readily performed in clinic.« less
  • This paper reports that Groups of Panasonic UD-802 thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were irradiated to successively increasing doses of Cesium-137 gamma radiation (0.662 MeV gamma rays) and then processed using a Panasonic UD-710 automatic TLD reader. The results were subjected to statistical tests to determine the critical level, the level of detection, and the less-than level. The critical level is equivalent to 1.7 mrad, the lower limit of detection is equivalent to 5 mrad and the less-than level has a high range value of 7.5 mrad.
  • A description is given of a method for the calibration of dosimeters which is based on the total absorption of a beam of ionizing particles of known energy in the substance of the detector and subsequent calculation of the mean absorbed dosage. In the case of luminescent detectors and low-penetration radiation, it is recommended that the measurement of the mean absorbed dosage be carried out by the difference method, i.e., from the change in the reading of the dosimeter after a layer of the substance under study has been placed between the dosimeter and the plane emitter. A dosimeter formore » beta radiation is described which has a plastic luminophor designed for energy values of 0.1 to 2 Mev at mean absorbed dosages not above 10/sup 4/ rad/hr.« less