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Title: SU-G-TeP4-12: Individual Beam QA for a Robotic Radiosurgery System Using a Scintillator Cone

Abstract

Purpose: The targeting accuracy of the Cyberknife system is measured by end-to-end tests delivering multiple isocentric beams to a point in space. While the targeting accuracy of two representative beams can be determined by a Winston-Lutz-type test, no test is available today to determine the targeting accuracy of each clinical beam. We used a scintillator cone to measure the accuracy of each individual beam. Methods: The XRV-124 from Logos Systems Int’l is a scintillator cone with an imaging system that is able to measure individual beam vectors and a resulting error between planned and measured beam coordinates. We measured the targeting accuracy of isocentric and non-isocentric beams for a number of test cases using the Iris and the fixed collimator. The average difference between plan and measured beam position was 0.8–1.2mm across the collimator sizes and plans considered here. The max error for a single beam was 2.5mm for the isocentric plans, and 1.67mm for the non-isocentric plans. The standard deviation of the differences was 0.5mm or less. Conclusion: The CyberKnife System is specified to have an overall targeting accuracy for static targets of less than 0.95mm. In E2E tests using the XRV124 system we measure average beam accuracy betweenmore » 0.8 to 1.23mm, with maximum of 2.5mm. We plan to investigate correlations between beam position error and robot position, and to quantify the effect of beam position errors on patient specific plans. Martina Descovich has received research support and speaker honoraria from Accuray.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649474
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; BEAM POSITION; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; ERRORS; PHOSPHORS; QUALITY ASSURANCE; RADIOTHERAPY; ROBOTS; SURGERY

Citation Formats

McGuinness, C, Descovich, M, and Sudhyadhom, A. SU-G-TeP4-12: Individual Beam QA for a Robotic Radiosurgery System Using a Scintillator Cone. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957137.
McGuinness, C, Descovich, M, & Sudhyadhom, A. SU-G-TeP4-12: Individual Beam QA for a Robotic Radiosurgery System Using a Scintillator Cone. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957137.
McGuinness, C, Descovich, M, and Sudhyadhom, A. 2016. "SU-G-TeP4-12: Individual Beam QA for a Robotic Radiosurgery System Using a Scintillator Cone". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957137.
@article{osti_22649474,
title = {SU-G-TeP4-12: Individual Beam QA for a Robotic Radiosurgery System Using a Scintillator Cone},
author = {McGuinness, C and Descovich, M and Sudhyadhom, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The targeting accuracy of the Cyberknife system is measured by end-to-end tests delivering multiple isocentric beams to a point in space. While the targeting accuracy of two representative beams can be determined by a Winston-Lutz-type test, no test is available today to determine the targeting accuracy of each clinical beam. We used a scintillator cone to measure the accuracy of each individual beam. Methods: The XRV-124 from Logos Systems Int’l is a scintillator cone with an imaging system that is able to measure individual beam vectors and a resulting error between planned and measured beam coordinates. We measured the targeting accuracy of isocentric and non-isocentric beams for a number of test cases using the Iris and the fixed collimator. The average difference between plan and measured beam position was 0.8–1.2mm across the collimator sizes and plans considered here. The max error for a single beam was 2.5mm for the isocentric plans, and 1.67mm for the non-isocentric plans. The standard deviation of the differences was 0.5mm or less. Conclusion: The CyberKnife System is specified to have an overall targeting accuracy for static targets of less than 0.95mm. In E2E tests using the XRV124 system we measure average beam accuracy between 0.8 to 1.23mm, with maximum of 2.5mm. We plan to investigate correlations between beam position error and robot position, and to quantify the effect of beam position errors on patient specific plans. Martina Descovich has received research support and speaker honoraria from Accuray.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957137},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Plastic scintillation dosimeters (PSDs) have favourable characteristics for small and composite field dosimetry in radiosurgery, however, imperfect corrections for the Cerenkov radiation contamination could limit their accuracy for complex deliveries. In this work, we characterize the dose and dose-rate linearity, directional dependence, and compare output factors with other stereotactic detectors for a new commercially available PSD (Exradin W1). We provide some preliminary comparisons of planned and measured dose for composite fields delivered clinically by a Cyberknife radiosurgery system. The W1 detector shows good linearity with dose (<0.5%) and dose rate (<0.8%) relative to the signal obtained using an ion chambermore » under the same conditions. A maximum difference of 2% was observed depending on the detector's angular orientation. Output factors for all detectors agree within a range of ±3.2% and ±1.5% for the 5 and 7.5 mm collimators, respectively, provided Monte-Carlo corrections for detector effects are applied to diode and ion chambers (without corrections the range is ±5.5% and ±3.1% for these two collimators). For clinical beam deliveries using 5 and 7.5 mm collimators, four of the six patients showed better agreement with planned dose for the PSD detector compared to a micro ion chamber. Two of the six patients investigated, however, showed 5% differences between PSD and planned dose, film measurements and the ratio of PSD and micro ion chamber signal suggest that further investigation is warranted for these plans. The W1 detector is a promising tool for stereotactic plan verification under the challenging dosimetric conditions of stereotactic radiosurgery.« less
  • Purpose: To characterize the dose distributions of Cyberknife and intensity-modulated-proton-therapy (IMPT). Methods: A total of 20 patients previously treated with Cyberknife were selected. The original planning-target-volume (PTV) was used in the ‘IMPT-ideal’ plan assuming a comparable image-guidance with Cyberknife. A 3mm expansion was made to create the proton-PTV for the ‘IMPT-3mm’ plan representing the current proton-therapy where a margin of 3mm is used to account for the inferior image-guidance. The proton range uncertainty was taken-care in beam-design by adding the proximal- and distal-margins (3%water-equivalent-depth+1mm) for both proton plans. The IMPT plans were generated to meet the same target coverage asmore » the Cyberknife-plans. The plan quality of IMPT-ideal and IMPT-3mm were compared to the Cyberknife-plan. To characterize plan quality, we defined the ratio(R) of volumes encompassed by the selected isodose surfaces for Cyberknife and IMPT plans (VCK/VIMPT). Comparisons were made for both Cyberknife versus IMPT-ideal and Cyberknife versusIMPT-3mm to further discuss the impact of setup error margins used in proton therapy and the correlation with target size and location. Results: IMPT-ideal plans yield comparable plan quality as CK plans and slightly better OAR sparing while the IMPT-3mm plan results in a higher dose to the OARs, especially for centralized tumors. Comparing to the IMPT-ideal plans, a slightly larger 80% (Ravg=1.05) dose cloud and significantly larger 50% (Ravg=1.3) and 20% (Ravg=1.60) dose clouds are seen in CK plans. However, the 3mm expansion results in a larger high and medium dose clouds in IMPT-3mm plans (Ravg=0.65 for 80%-isodose; Ravg=0.93 for 50%-isodose). The trend increases with the size of the target and the distance from the brainstem to the center of target. Conclusion: Cyberknife is more preferable for treating centralized targets and proton therapy is advantageous for the large and peripheral targets. Advanced image guidance would improve the efficacy of proton therapy for intracranial treatments.« less
  • Purpose: The optically guided target localization had been developed for linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Unlike the traditional laser localization, the optical guided target localization utilizes a digital system to position patient. Although the system has been proven accurate and robust, it takes away the capability of physicist to directly double check the target position prior to irradiation. Any error from system calibration, data transformation, or head ring position maintenance will not be caught. The purpose of this work is to investigate the possibility of using cone-beam CT (CBCT) to double check the optically guided SRS target localization andmore » reposition the patient. Methods: A SRS quality assurance (QA) phantom was used in the study. The phantom mounted with SRS head frame was scanned by computer tomography (CT) and planned according to the SRS radiation treatment planning process. A target isocenter is defined and transferred to the optically guided target localization system. The phantom was then transported to the linear accelerator room and localized at the initial position agreed by the optically guided target localization system and the CBCT system. Tests were conducted by moving/rotating the phantom to a set of preset offsets and taking CBCT images. Shifts detected by CBCT were compared with the preset offsets. Agreements between them were studied to see how well the CBCT was in discovering the optically guided target localization error. Results: Experiment results demonstrated good agreement between the CBCT detected phantom shift and the preset offset, when the offset is above 1 mm shift or 0.2 degree rotation. Offset less than 1 mm shift or 0.2 degree rotation was not detectable by CBCT. Conclusions: The study concludes that the CBCT is able to discover the optically guided target localization error due to the system calibration or had ring migration. It is a valuable second check tool for SRS target localization quality assurance. The accuracy of CBCT in estimating patient positioning deviation satisfies the SRS procedures with generous tumor size and margin that can tolerate 1 mm or 0.2 degree accuracy. This avoids sending patient home without treatment. CBCT can be neither used as a primary SRS target localization nor can it be used to reposition the patient that cannot tolerate 1 mm shift or 0.2 degree rotation.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using TMR ratio correction factors for a fast online adaptive plan to compensate for anatomical changes in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of L-spine tumors. Methods: Three coplanar treatment plans were made for 11 patients: Uniform (9 IMRT beams equally distributed around the patient); Posterior (IMRT with 9 posterior beams every 20 degree) and VMAT (2 360° arcs). For each patient, the external body and bowel gas were contoured on the planning CT and pre-treatment CBCT. After registering CBCT and the planning CT by aligning to the tumor, the CBCT contours were transferred to the planningmore » CT. To estimate the actual delivered dose while considering patient’s anatomy of the treatment day, a hybrid CT was created by overriding densities in planning CT using the differences between CT and CBCT external and bowel gas contours. Correction factors (CF) were calculated using the effective depth information obtained from the planning system using the hybrid CT: CF = TMR (delivery)/TMR (planning). The adaptive plan was generated by multiplying the planned Monitor Units with the CFs. Results: The mean absolute difference (MAD) in V16Gy of the target between planned and estimated delivery with and without TMR correction was 0.8 ± 0.7% vs. 2.4 ± 1.3% for Uniform and 1.0 ± 0.9% vs. 2.6 ± 1.3% for VMAT plans(p<0.05), respectively. For V12Gy of cauda-equina with and without TMR correction, MAD was 0.24 ± 0.19% vs. 1.2 ± 1.02% for Uniform and 0.23 ± 0.20% vs. 0.78 ± 0.79% for VMAT plans(p<0.05), respectively. The differences between adaptive and original plans were not significant for posterior plans. Conclusion: The online adaptive strategy using TMR ratios and pre-treatment CBCT information was feasible strategy to compensate for anatomical changes for the patients treated for L-spine tumors, particularly for equally spaced IMRT and VMAT plans.« less
  • Purpose: Image guidance has improved the precision of fractionated radiation treatment delivery on linear accelerators. Precise radiation delivery is particularly critical when high doses are delivered to complex shapes with steep dose gradients near critical structures, as is the case for intracranial radiosurgery. To reduce potential geometric uncertainties, a cone beam computed tomography (CT) image guidance system was developed in-house to generate high-resolution images of the head at the time of treatment, using a dedicated radiosurgery unit. The performance and initial clinical use of this imaging system are described. Methods and Materials: A kilovoltage cone beam CT system was integratedmore » with a Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery unit. The X-ray tube and flat-panel detector are mounted on a translational arm, which is parked above the treatment unit when not in use. Upon descent, a rotational axis provides 210 Degree-Sign of rotation for cone beam CT scans. Mechanical integrity of the system was evaluated over a 6-month period. Subsequent clinical commissioning included end-to-end testing of targeting performance and subjective image quality performance in phantoms. The system has been used to image 2 patients, 1 of whom received single-fraction radiosurgery and 1 who received 3 fractions, using a relocatable head frame. Results: Images of phantoms demonstrated soft tissue contrast visibility and submillimeter spatial resolution. A contrast difference of 35 HU was easily detected at a calibration dose of 1.2 cGy (center of head phantom). The shape of the mechanical flex vs scan angle was highly reproducible and exhibited <0.2 mm peak-to-peak variation. With a 0.5-mm voxel pitch, the maximum targeting error was 0.4 mm. Images of 2 patients were analyzed offline and submillimeter agreement was confirmed with conventional frame. Conclusions: A cone beam CT image guidance system was successfully adapted to a radiosurgery unit. The system is capable of producing high-resolution images of bone and soft tissue. The system is in clinical use and provides excellent image guidance without invasive frames.« less