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Title: SU-G-IeP4-14: Prostate Brachytherapy Activity Measurement and Source Localization by Using a Dual Photon Emission Computed Tomography System: A Feasibility Study

Abstract

Purpose: To monitor the activity distribution and needle position during and after implantation in operating rooms. Methods: Simulation studies were conducted to assess the feasibility of measurement activity distribution and seed localization using the DuPECT system. The system consists of a LaBr3-based probe and planar detection heads, a collimation system, and a coincidence circuit. The two heads can be manipulated independently. Simplified Yb-169 brachytherapy seeds were used. A water-filled cylindrical phantom with a 40-mm diameter and 40-mm length was used to model a simplified prostate of the Asian man. Two simplified seeds were placed at a radial distance of 10 mm and tangential distance of 10 mm from the center of the phantom. The probe head was arranged perpendicular to the planar head. Results of various imaging durations were analyzed and the accuracy of the seed localization was assessed by calculating the centroid of the seed. Results: The reconstructed images indicate that the DuPECT can measure the activity distribution and locate the seeds dwelt in different positions intraoperatively. The calculated centroid on average turned out to be accurate within the pixel size of 0.5 mm. The two sources were identified when the duration is longer than 15 s. The sensitivitymore » measured in water was merely 0.07 cps/MBq. Conclusion: Preliminary results show that the measurement of the activity distribution and seed localization are feasible using the DuPECT system intraoperatively. It indicates the DuPECT system has potential to be an approach for dose-distribution-validation. The efficacy of acvtivity distribution measurement and source localization using the DuPECT system will evaluated in more realistic phantom studies (e.g., various attenuation materials and greater number of seeds) in the future investigation.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)
  2. National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649449
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BRACHYTHERAPY; CYLINDRICAL CONFIGURATION; DISTRIBUTION; EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; HEAD; PHANTOMS; PHOTON EMISSION; PROSTATE

Citation Formats

Lin, C, Lin, H, Chuang, K, Chiang, C, and Tsai, Y. SU-G-IeP4-14: Prostate Brachytherapy Activity Measurement and Source Localization by Using a Dual Photon Emission Computed Tomography System: A Feasibility Study. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957109.
Lin, C, Lin, H, Chuang, K, Chiang, C, & Tsai, Y. SU-G-IeP4-14: Prostate Brachytherapy Activity Measurement and Source Localization by Using a Dual Photon Emission Computed Tomography System: A Feasibility Study. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957109.
Lin, C, Lin, H, Chuang, K, Chiang, C, and Tsai, Y. 2016. "SU-G-IeP4-14: Prostate Brachytherapy Activity Measurement and Source Localization by Using a Dual Photon Emission Computed Tomography System: A Feasibility Study". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957109.
@article{osti_22649449,
title = {SU-G-IeP4-14: Prostate Brachytherapy Activity Measurement and Source Localization by Using a Dual Photon Emission Computed Tomography System: A Feasibility Study},
author = {Lin, C and Lin, H and Chuang, K and Chiang, C and Tsai, Y},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To monitor the activity distribution and needle position during and after implantation in operating rooms. Methods: Simulation studies were conducted to assess the feasibility of measurement activity distribution and seed localization using the DuPECT system. The system consists of a LaBr3-based probe and planar detection heads, a collimation system, and a coincidence circuit. The two heads can be manipulated independently. Simplified Yb-169 brachytherapy seeds were used. A water-filled cylindrical phantom with a 40-mm diameter and 40-mm length was used to model a simplified prostate of the Asian man. Two simplified seeds were placed at a radial distance of 10 mm and tangential distance of 10 mm from the center of the phantom. The probe head was arranged perpendicular to the planar head. Results of various imaging durations were analyzed and the accuracy of the seed localization was assessed by calculating the centroid of the seed. Results: The reconstructed images indicate that the DuPECT can measure the activity distribution and locate the seeds dwelt in different positions intraoperatively. The calculated centroid on average turned out to be accurate within the pixel size of 0.5 mm. The two sources were identified when the duration is longer than 15 s. The sensitivity measured in water was merely 0.07 cps/MBq. Conclusion: Preliminary results show that the measurement of the activity distribution and seed localization are feasible using the DuPECT system intraoperatively. It indicates the DuPECT system has potential to be an approach for dose-distribution-validation. The efficacy of acvtivity distribution measurement and source localization using the DuPECT system will evaluated in more realistic phantom studies (e.g., various attenuation materials and greater number of seeds) in the future investigation.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957109},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To optimize collimation and shielding for a deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron generator for an inexpensive and compact clinical neutron imaging system. The envisioned application is cancer diagnosis through Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT). Methods: Collimator designs were tested with an isotropic 2.5 MeV neutron source through GEANT4 simulations. The collimator is a 52×52×52 cm{sup 3} polyethylene block coupled with a 1 cm lead sheet in sequence. Composite opening was modeled into the collimator to permit passage of neutrons. The opening varied in shape (cylindrical vs. tapered), size (1–5 cm source-side and target-side openings) and aperture placements (13–39 cm frommore » source-side). Spatial and energy distribution of neutrons and gammas were tracked from each collimator design. Parameters analyzed were primary beam width (FWHM), divergence, and efficiency (percent transmission) for different configurations of the collimator. Select resultant outputs were then used for simulated NSECT imaging of a virtual breast phantom containing a 2.5 cm diameter tumor to assess the effect of the collimator on spatial resolution, noise, and scan time. Finally, composite shielding enclosure made of polyethylene and lead was designed and evaluated to block 99.99% of neutron and gamma radiation generated in the system. Results: Analysis of primary beam indicated the beam-width is linear to the aperture size. Increasing source-side opening allowed at least 20% more neutron throughput for all designs relative to the cylindrical openings. Maximum throughput for all designs was 364% relative to cylindrical openings. Conclusion: The work indicates potential for collimating and shielding a DD neutron generator for use in a clinical NSECT system. The proposed collimator designs produced a well-defined collimated neutron beam that can be used to image samples of interest with millimeter resolution. Balance in output efficiency, noise reduction, and scan time should be considered to determine the optimal design for specific NSECT applications.« less
  • Purpose: An improvement in tissue assignment for low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDRB) patients using more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation was accomplished with a metallic artifact reduction (MAR) method specific to dual-energy computed tomography (DECT). Methods: The proposed MAR algorithm followed a four-step procedure. The first step involved applying a weighted blend of both DECT scans (I {sub H/L}) to generate a new image (I {sub Mix}). This action minimized Hounsfield unit (HU) variations surrounding the brachytherapy seeds. In the second step, the mean HU of the prostate in I {sub Mix} was calculated and shifted toward the mean HUmore » of the two original DECT images (I {sub H/L}). The third step involved smoothing the newly shifted I {sub Mix} and the two original I {sub H/L}, followed by a subtraction of both, generating an image that represented the metallic artifact (I {sub A,(H/L)}) of reduced noise levels. The final step consisted of subtracting the original I {sub H/L} from the newly generated I {sub A,(H/L)} and obtaining a final image corrected for metallic artifacts. Following the completion of the algorithm, a DECT stoichiometric method was used to extract the relative electronic density (ρ{sub e}) and effective atomic number (Z {sub eff}) at each voxel of the corrected scans. Tissue assignment could then be determined with these two newly acquired physical parameters. Each voxel was assigned the tissue bearing the closest resemblance in terms of ρ{sub e} and Z {sub eff}, comparing with values from the ICRU 42 database. A MC study was then performed to compare the dosimetric impacts of alternative MAR algorithms. Results: An improvement in tissue assignment was observed with the DECT MAR algorithm, compared to the single-energy computed tomography (SECT) approach. In a phantom study, tissue misassignment was found to reach 0.05% of voxels using the DECT approach, compared with 0.40% using the SECT method. Comparison of the DECT and SECT D {sub 90} dose parameter (volume receiving 90% of the dose) indicated that D {sub 90} could be underestimated by up to 2.3% using the SECT method. Conclusions: The DECT MAR approach is a simple alternative to reduce metallic artifacts found in LDRB patient scans. Images can be processed quickly and do not require the determination of x-ray spectra. Substantial information on density and atomic number can also be obtained. Furthermore, calcifications within the prostate are detected by the tissue assignment algorithm. This enables more accurate, patient-specific MC dose calculations.« less
  • To test the hypothesis that simultaneous dual energy single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with technetium-99m (99mTc) pyrophosphate and thallium-201 (201TI) can provide an accurate estimate of the size of myocardial infarction and to assess the correlation between infarct size and peak serum creatine kinase activity, 165 patients with acute myocardial infarction underwent SPECT 3.2 +/- 1.3 (SD) days after the onset of acute myocardial infarction. In the present study, the difference in the intensity of 99mTc-pyrophosphate accumulation was assumed to be attributable to difference in the volume of infarcted myocardium, and the infarct volume was corrected by the ratiomore » of the myocardial activity to the osseous activity to quantify the intensity of 99mTc-pyrophosphate accumulation. The correlation of measured infarct volume with peak serum creatine kinase activity was significant (r = 0.60, p less than 0.01). There was also a significant linear correlation between the corrected infarct volume and peak serum creatine kinase activity (r = 0.71, p less than 0.01). Subgroup analysis showed a high correlation between corrected volume and peak creatine kinase activity in patients with anterior infarctions (r = 0.75, p less than 0.01) but a poor correlation in patients with inferior or posterior infarctions (r = 0.50, p less than 0.01). In both the early reperfusion and the no reperfusion groups, a good correlation was found between corrected infarct volume and peak serum creatine kinase activity (r = 0.76 and r = 0.76, respectively; p less than 0.01).« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the clinical utility of capromab pendetide imaging with single photon emission computed tomography coregistration with computed tomography (SPECT/CT) in primary prostate cancer (CaP) for pretreatment prognostic staging and localization of biologic target volumes (BTV) for individualized image-guided radiotherapy dose escalation (IGRT-DE). Methods and Materials: Patients consecutively presenting for primary radiotherapy (February 1997 to December 2002), having a clinical diagnosis of localized CaP, were evaluated for tumor stage using conventional staging and SPECT/CT (N = 239). Distant metastatic uptake (mets) were identified by SPECT/CT in 22 (9.2%). None of the suspected mets could be clinically confirmed. Thus, allmore » subjects were followed without alteration in disease management. The SPECT/CT pelvic images defined BTV for IGRT-DE (+150% brachytherapy dose) without (n = 150) or with (n = 89) external radiation of 45 Gy. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria defined risk groups (RG). The median survivor follow-up was 7 years. Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was reported by clinical nadir +2 ng/mL (CN+2) criteria. Statistical analyses included Kaplan-Meier, multivariate analysis, and Concordance-index models. Results: At 10-year analyses, overall survival was 84.8% and bDFS was 84.6%. With stratification by RG, CN+2 bDFS was 93.5% for the low-RG (n = 116), 78.7% for the intermediate-RG (n = 94), and 68.8% for the high-RG (n = 29), p = 0.0002. With stratification by pretreatment SPECT/CT findings, bDFS was 65.5% in patients with suspected mets (n = 22) vs. 86.6% in patients with only localized uptake (n = 217), p = 0.0014. CaP disease-specific survival (DSS) was 97.7% for the cohort. With stratification by SPECT/CT findings, DSS was 86.4% (with suspected mets) vs. 99.0% (localized only), p = 0.0001. Using multivariate analysis, the DSS hazard ratio for SPECT/CT findings (mets vs. localized) was 3.58 (p = 0.0026). Concordance-index tests, based on all data, by CN+2 bDFS criteria were 0.710 for RG alone and 0.773 for SPECT/CT + RG. Conclusions: Through long-term outcomes we demonstrate statistically significant bDFS and DSS predictive value for pretreatment capromab pendetide SPECT/CT imaging in primary CaP. Dual clinical utility is demonstrated, using SPECT/CT to define BTV for individualized IGRT-DE.« less
  • The application of dual tracer transaxial emission computed tomography of the heart was studied with use of /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate and /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells for measuring infarct size in 20 patients with acute myocardial infarction and 10 without infarction. Imaging was performed with a standard gamma camera and with a multidetector transaxial emission computed tomographic body scanner 3 hours after injection of /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate. Immediately after the scanning procedure, /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate was injected to label red blood cells, and the scanning protocol was repeated. /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate was detected in the anterior wall with involvement ofmore » the interventricular septum or lateral wall in patients with electrocardiographic criteria for anterior infarction, whereas uptake was detected in the diaphragmatic left ventricular wall with involvement of the posterior, posteroseptal or posterolateral left ventricle or of the right ventricle in patients with electrocardiographic criteria for inferior or posterior infarction. Infarct size measured from transaxial images ranged from 14.0 to 117.0 g in weight. There was a direct relation between infarct size and patient prognosis in that, of the 13 patients with infarct greater than 40 g, 11 (85 percent) had complications, whereas only 2 (29 percent) of 7 patients with an infarct less than 40 g had complications during a follow-up period averaging 17.8 months (p less than 0.05).« less