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Title: SU-G-IeP4-07: Feasibility of Low Dose 18FDG PET in Pediatric Oncology Patients

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of low dose FDG PET in pediatric oncology patients using virtual dose reduction as well as true patients PET/CT scans. Methods: Wholebody 18F-FDG PET/CT of 39 clinical pediatric patients (0.16±0.06MBq/kg) were scanned on a Gemini TF 64 system at 75±5 min post FDG injection using 3min/bed. Based on the 180s/bed listmode PET data, subsets of total counts in 120s, 90s, 60s, 30s and 15s per bed position were extracted for PET reconstruction to simulate lower dose PET at 2/3th, 1/2th, 1/3th, 1/6th and 1/12th dose levels. PET/CT scans of Jaszczak PET phantom with 6 hot hollow spheres varying with sizes and contrast ratios were performed (real PET versus simulated PET) to validate the methodology of virtual dose PET simulation. Region of interests (ROIs) were placed on lesions and normal anatomical tissues with quantitative and qualitative assessment performed. Significant lower FDG dose PET/CT of 5 research adolescents were scanned to validate the proposal and low dose PET feasibility. Results: Although all lesions are visible on the 1/12th dose PET, overall PET image quality appears to be influenced in a multi-factorial way. 30%–60% dose reduction from current standard of care FDG PET is recommended tomore » maintain equivalent quality and PET quantification. An optimized BMI-based FDG administration is recommended (from 1.1±0.5 mCi for BMI < 18.5 to 4.8±1.5 mCi for BMI > 30). A linear lowest “Dose-BMI” relationship is given. SUVs from 1/12th to full dose PETs were identified as consistent (R2 = 1.08, 0.99, 1.01, 1.00 and 0.98). No significant variances of count density, SUV and SNR were found across certain dose ranges (p<0.01). Conclusion: Pediatric PET/CT can be performed using current time-of-flight systems at substantially lower PET doses (30–60%) than the standard of care PET/CT without compromising qualitative and quantitative image quality in clinical.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649442
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IMAGE PROCESSING; PATIENTS; PEDIATRICS; RADIATION DOSES; SIMULATION; TIME-OF-FLIGHT METHOD

Citation Formats

Zhang, J, Binzel, K, Hall, NC, Natwa, M, Knopp, MI, and Knopp, MV. SU-G-IeP4-07: Feasibility of Low Dose 18FDG PET in Pediatric Oncology Patients. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957102.
Zhang, J, Binzel, K, Hall, NC, Natwa, M, Knopp, MI, & Knopp, MV. SU-G-IeP4-07: Feasibility of Low Dose 18FDG PET in Pediatric Oncology Patients. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957102.
Zhang, J, Binzel, K, Hall, NC, Natwa, M, Knopp, MI, and Knopp, MV. 2016. "SU-G-IeP4-07: Feasibility of Low Dose 18FDG PET in Pediatric Oncology Patients". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957102.
@article{osti_22649442,
title = {SU-G-IeP4-07: Feasibility of Low Dose 18FDG PET in Pediatric Oncology Patients},
author = {Zhang, J and Binzel, K and Hall, NC and Natwa, M and Knopp, MI and Knopp, MV},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of low dose FDG PET in pediatric oncology patients using virtual dose reduction as well as true patients PET/CT scans. Methods: Wholebody 18F-FDG PET/CT of 39 clinical pediatric patients (0.16±0.06MBq/kg) were scanned on a Gemini TF 64 system at 75±5 min post FDG injection using 3min/bed. Based on the 180s/bed listmode PET data, subsets of total counts in 120s, 90s, 60s, 30s and 15s per bed position were extracted for PET reconstruction to simulate lower dose PET at 2/3th, 1/2th, 1/3th, 1/6th and 1/12th dose levels. PET/CT scans of Jaszczak PET phantom with 6 hot hollow spheres varying with sizes and contrast ratios were performed (real PET versus simulated PET) to validate the methodology of virtual dose PET simulation. Region of interests (ROIs) were placed on lesions and normal anatomical tissues with quantitative and qualitative assessment performed. Significant lower FDG dose PET/CT of 5 research adolescents were scanned to validate the proposal and low dose PET feasibility. Results: Although all lesions are visible on the 1/12th dose PET, overall PET image quality appears to be influenced in a multi-factorial way. 30%–60% dose reduction from current standard of care FDG PET is recommended to maintain equivalent quality and PET quantification. An optimized BMI-based FDG administration is recommended (from 1.1±0.5 mCi for BMI < 18.5 to 4.8±1.5 mCi for BMI > 30). A linear lowest “Dose-BMI” relationship is given. SUVs from 1/12th to full dose PETs were identified as consistent (R2 = 1.08, 0.99, 1.01, 1.00 and 0.98). No significant variances of count density, SUV and SNR were found across certain dose ranges (p<0.01). Conclusion: Pediatric PET/CT can be performed using current time-of-flight systems at substantially lower PET doses (30–60%) than the standard of care PET/CT without compromising qualitative and quantitative image quality in clinical.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957102},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • We present a group of eight pediatric cancer patients with a spectrum of visual afferent pathway abnormalities. Changes include decreased visual acuity, visual field alterations, abnormal visual evoked potentials, changes in the optic disc and nerve fiber layer of the retina, radiation retinopathy, and CNS injury. These changes occur in long term survivors of pediatric malignancy (especially those with prolonged, multimodal, and multicourse therapy), but they may be minimally symptomatic. The changes appear to be analogous to the CNS changes (leukoencephalopathy) described in patients with leukemia and attributed to multimodal therapy. By taking advantage of opportunities to detect adverse effectsmore » earlier in the treatment course, the present excellent cure rate may be improved by refinements in therapy that also improve the quality of survival.« less
  • Purpose: This study demonstrates a means of implementing an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ) technique for dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) while maintaining similar noise levels in the reconstructed image. The effects of image quality and noise texture were assessed at all implementation levels of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign . Empirically derived dose reduction limits were established for ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for imaging of the trunk for a pediatric oncology population ranging from 1 yr old through adolescence/adulthood. Methods: Image quality was assessed using metrics established by the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation program. Each image quality metricmore » was tested using the ACR CT phantom with 0%-100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign blended with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructed images. Additionally, the noise power spectrum (NPS) was calculated for three common reconstruction filters of the trunk. The empirically derived limitations on ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign implementation for dose reduction were assessed using (1, 5, 10) yr old and adolescent/adult anthropomorphic phantoms. To assess dose reduction limits, the phantoms were scanned in increments of increased noise index (decrementing mA using automatic tube current modulation) balanced with ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction to maintain noise equivalence of the 0% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign image. Results: The ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign algorithm did not produce any unfavorable effects on image quality as assessed by ACR criteria. Conversely, low-contrast resolution was found to improve due to the reduction of noise in the reconstructed images. NPS calculations demonstrated that images with lower frequency noise had lower noise variance and coarser graininess at progressively higher percentages of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction; and in spite of the similar magnitudes of noise, the image reconstructed with 50% or more ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign presented a more smoothed appearance than the pre-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign 100% FBP image. Finally, relative to non-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign images with 100% of standard dose across the pediatric phantom age spectrum, similar noise levels were obtained in the images at a dose reduction of 48% with 40% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign and a dose reduction of 82% with 100% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign . Conclusions: The authors' work was conducted to identify the dose reduction limits of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for a pediatric oncology population using automatic tube current modulation. Improvements in noise levels from ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction were adapted to provide lower radiation exposure (i.e., lower mA) instead of improved image quality. We have demonstrated for the image quality standards required at our institution, a maximum dose reduction of 82% can be achieved using 100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ; however, to negate changes in the appearance of reconstructed images using ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign with a medium to low frequency noise preserving reconstruction filter (i.e., standard), 40% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign was implemented in our clinic for 42%-48% dose reduction at all pediatric ages without a visually perceptible change in image quality or image noise.« less
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  • Short communication.
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