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Title: SU-G-IeP4-04: DD-Neutron Source Collimation for Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

Abstract

Purpose: To optimize collimation and shielding for a deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron generator for an inexpensive and compact clinical neutron imaging system. The envisioned application is cancer diagnosis through Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT). Methods: Collimator designs were tested with an isotropic 2.5 MeV neutron source through GEANT4 simulations. The collimator is a 52×52×52 cm{sup 3} polyethylene block coupled with a 1 cm lead sheet in sequence. Composite opening was modeled into the collimator to permit passage of neutrons. The opening varied in shape (cylindrical vs. tapered), size (1–5 cm source-side and target-side openings) and aperture placements (13–39 cm from source-side). Spatial and energy distribution of neutrons and gammas were tracked from each collimator design. Parameters analyzed were primary beam width (FWHM), divergence, and efficiency (percent transmission) for different configurations of the collimator. Select resultant outputs were then used for simulated NSECT imaging of a virtual breast phantom containing a 2.5 cm diameter tumor to assess the effect of the collimator on spatial resolution, noise, and scan time. Finally, composite shielding enclosure made of polyethylene and lead was designed and evaluated to block 99.99% of neutron and gamma radiation generated in the system. Results: Analysis of primary beam indicated themore » beam-width is linear to the aperture size. Increasing source-side opening allowed at least 20% more neutron throughput for all designs relative to the cylindrical openings. Maximum throughput for all designs was 364% relative to cylindrical openings. Conclusion: The work indicates potential for collimating and shielding a DD neutron generator for use in a clinical NSECT system. The proposed collimator designs produced a well-defined collimated neutron beam that can be used to image samples of interest with millimeter resolution. Balance in output efficiency, noise reduction, and scan time should be considered to determine the optimal design for specific NSECT applications.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, North Carolina (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649439
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BEAM PROFILES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COLLIMATORS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CYLINDRICAL CONFIGURATION; DESIGN; EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; GAMMA RADIATION; IMAGES; MAMMARY GLANDS; MEV RANGE 01-10; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NEUTRON BEAMS; SHIELDING; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; STIMULATED EMISSION

Citation Formats

Fong, G, and Kapadia, A. SU-G-IeP4-04: DD-Neutron Source Collimation for Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957099.
Fong, G, & Kapadia, A. SU-G-IeP4-04: DD-Neutron Source Collimation for Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957099.
Fong, G, and Kapadia, A. 2016. "SU-G-IeP4-04: DD-Neutron Source Collimation for Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957099.
@article{osti_22649439,
title = {SU-G-IeP4-04: DD-Neutron Source Collimation for Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study},
author = {Fong, G and Kapadia, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To optimize collimation and shielding for a deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron generator for an inexpensive and compact clinical neutron imaging system. The envisioned application is cancer diagnosis through Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT). Methods: Collimator designs were tested with an isotropic 2.5 MeV neutron source through GEANT4 simulations. The collimator is a 52×52×52 cm{sup 3} polyethylene block coupled with a 1 cm lead sheet in sequence. Composite opening was modeled into the collimator to permit passage of neutrons. The opening varied in shape (cylindrical vs. tapered), size (1–5 cm source-side and target-side openings) and aperture placements (13–39 cm from source-side). Spatial and energy distribution of neutrons and gammas were tracked from each collimator design. Parameters analyzed were primary beam width (FWHM), divergence, and efficiency (percent transmission) for different configurations of the collimator. Select resultant outputs were then used for simulated NSECT imaging of a virtual breast phantom containing a 2.5 cm diameter tumor to assess the effect of the collimator on spatial resolution, noise, and scan time. Finally, composite shielding enclosure made of polyethylene and lead was designed and evaluated to block 99.99% of neutron and gamma radiation generated in the system. Results: Analysis of primary beam indicated the beam-width is linear to the aperture size. Increasing source-side opening allowed at least 20% more neutron throughput for all designs relative to the cylindrical openings. Maximum throughput for all designs was 364% relative to cylindrical openings. Conclusion: The work indicates potential for collimating and shielding a DD neutron generator for use in a clinical NSECT system. The proposed collimator designs produced a well-defined collimated neutron beam that can be used to image samples of interest with millimeter resolution. Balance in output efficiency, noise reduction, and scan time should be considered to determine the optimal design for specific NSECT applications.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957099},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To monitor the activity distribution and needle position during and after implantation in operating rooms. Methods: Simulation studies were conducted to assess the feasibility of measurement activity distribution and seed localization using the DuPECT system. The system consists of a LaBr3-based probe and planar detection heads, a collimation system, and a coincidence circuit. The two heads can be manipulated independently. Simplified Yb-169 brachytherapy seeds were used. A water-filled cylindrical phantom with a 40-mm diameter and 40-mm length was used to model a simplified prostate of the Asian man. Two simplified seeds were placed at a radial distance of 10more » mm and tangential distance of 10 mm from the center of the phantom. The probe head was arranged perpendicular to the planar head. Results of various imaging durations were analyzed and the accuracy of the seed localization was assessed by calculating the centroid of the seed. Results: The reconstructed images indicate that the DuPECT can measure the activity distribution and locate the seeds dwelt in different positions intraoperatively. The calculated centroid on average turned out to be accurate within the pixel size of 0.5 mm. The two sources were identified when the duration is longer than 15 s. The sensitivity measured in water was merely 0.07 cps/MBq. Conclusion: Preliminary results show that the measurement of the activity distribution and seed localization are feasible using the DuPECT system intraoperatively. It indicates the DuPECT system has potential to be an approach for dose-distribution-validation. The efficacy of acvtivity distribution measurement and source localization using the DuPECT system will evaluated in more realistic phantom studies (e.g., various attenuation materials and greater number of seeds) in the future investigation.« less
  • Purpose: In this article, we describe a method to estimate the spatial dose variation, average dose and mean glandular dose (MGD) for a real breast using Monte Carlo simulation based on cone beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT) images. We present and discuss the dose estimation results for 19 mastectomy breast specimens, 4 homogeneous breast models, 6 ellipsoidal phantoms, and 6 cylindrical phantoms. Methods: To validate the Monte Carlo method for dose estimation in CBBCT, we compared the Monte Carlo dose estimates with the thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements at various radial positions in two polycarbonate cylinders (11- and 15-cm in diameter). Cone-beammore » computed tomography (CBCT) images of 19 mastectomy breast specimens, obtained with a bench-top experimental scanner, were segmented and used to construct 19 structured breast models. Monte Carlo simulation of CBBCT with these models was performed and used to estimate the point doses, average doses, and mean glandular doses for unit open air exposure at the iso-center. Mass based glandularity values were computed and used to investigate their effects on the average doses as well as the mean glandular doses. Average doses for 4 homogeneous breast models were estimated and compared to those of the corresponding structured breast models to investigate the effect of tissue structures. Average doses for ellipsoidal and cylindrical digital phantoms of identical diameter and height were also estimated for various glandularity values and compared with those for the structured breast models. Results: The absorbed dose maps for structured breast models show that doses in the glandular tissue were higher than those in the nearby adipose tissue. Estimated average doses for the homogeneous breast models were almost identical to those for the structured breast models (p=1). Normalized average doses estimated for the ellipsoidal phantoms were similar to those for the structured breast models (root mean square (rms) percentage difference=1.7%; p=0.01), whereas those for the cylindrical phantoms were significantly lower (rms percentage difference=7.7%; p<0.01). Normalized MGDs were found to decrease with increasing glandularity. Conclusions: Our results indicate that it is sufficient to use homogeneous breast models derived from CBCT generated structured breast models to estimate the average dose. This investigation also shows that ellipsoidal digital phantoms of similar dimensions (diameter and height) and glandularity to actual breasts may be used to represent a real breast to estimate the average breast dose with Monte Carlo simulation. We have also successfully demonstrated the use of structured breast models to estimate the true MGDs and shown that the normalized MGDs decreased with the glandularity as previously reported by other researchers for CBBCT or mammography.« less
  • Purpose: Cone beam breast computed tomography (breast CT) with true three-dimensional, nearly isotropic spatial resolution has been developed and investigated over the past decade to overcome the problem of lesions overlapping with breast anatomical structures on two-dimensional mammographic images. However, the ability of breast CT to detect small objects, such as tissue structure edges and small calcifications, is limited. To resolve this problem, the authors proposed and developed a volume-of-interest (VOI) breast CT technique to image a small VOI using a higher radiation dose to improve that region’s visibility. In this study, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations to estimatemore » average breast dose and average glandular dose (AGD) for the VOI breast CT technique. Methods: Electron–Gamma-Shower system code-based Monte Carlo codes were used to simulate breast CT. The Monte Carlo codes estimated were validated using physical measurements of air kerma ratios and point doses in phantoms with an ion chamber and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. The validated full cone x-ray source was then collimated to simulate half cone beam x-rays to image digital pendant-geometry, hemi-ellipsoidal, homogeneous breast phantoms and to estimate breast doses with full field scans. 13-cm in diameter, 10-cm long hemi-ellipsoidal homogeneous phantoms were used to simulate median breasts. Breast compositions of 25% and 50% volumetric glandular fractions (VGFs) were used to investigate the influence on breast dose. The simulated half cone beam x-rays were then collimated to a narrow x-ray beam with an area of 2.5 × 2.5 cm{sup 2} field of view at the isocenter plane and to perform VOI field scans. The Monte Carlo results for the full field scans and the VOI field scans were then used to estimate the AGD for the VOI breast CT technique. Results: The ratios of air kerma ratios and dose measurement results from the Monte Carlo simulation to those from the physical measurements were 0.97 ± 0.03 and 1.10 ± 0.13, respectively, indicating that the accuracy of the Monte Carlo simulation was adequate. The normalized AGD with VOI field scans was substantially reduced by a factor of about 2 over the VOI region and by a factor of 18 over the entire breast for both 25% and 50% VGF simulated breasts compared with the normalized AGD with full field scans. The normalized AGD for the VOI breast CT technique can be kept the same as or lower than that for a full field scan with the exposure level for the VOI field scan increased by a factor of as much as 12. Conclusions: The authors’ Monte Carlo estimates of normalized AGDs for the VOI breast CT technique show that this technique can be used to markedly increase the dose to the breast and thus the visibility of the VOI region without increasing the dose to the breast. The results of this investigation should be helpful for those interested in using VOI breast CT technique to image small calcifications with dose concern.« less
  • Purpose: The decay of In-111 results in a non-isotropic gamma-ray cascade, which is normally imaged using a gamma camera. Creating images with a gamma camera using coincident gamma-rays from In-111 has not been previously studied. Our objective was to explore the feasibility of imaging this cascade as coincidence events and to determine the optimal timing resolution and source activity using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: GEANT4 was used to simulate the decay of the In-111 nucleus and to model the gamma camera. Each photon emission was assigned a timestamp, and the time delay and angular separation for the second gamma-ray inmore » the cascade was consistent with the known intermediate state half-life of 85ns. The gamma-rays are transported through a model of a Siemens dual head Symbia “S” gamma camera with a 5/8-inch thick crystal and medium energy collimators. A true coincident event was defined as a single 171keV gamma-ray followed by a single 245keV gamma-ray within a specified time window (or vice versa). Several source activities (ranging from 10uCi to 5mCi) with and without incorporation of background counts were then simulated. Each simulation was analyzed using varying time windows to assess random events. The noise equivalent count rate (NECR) was computed based on the number of true and random counts for each combination of activity and time window. No scatter events were assumed since sources were simulated in air. Results: As expected, increasing the timing window increased the total number of observed coincidences albeit at the expense of true coincidences. A timing window range of 200–500ns maximizes the NECR at clinically-used source activities. The background rate did not significantly alter the maximum NECR. Conclusion: This work suggests coincident measurements of In-111 gamma-ray decay can be performed with commercial gamma cameras at clinically-relevant activities. Work is ongoing to assess useful clinical applications.« less
  • The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of the patient dose due to the kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) in a prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The dose distributions for the five prostate IMRTs were calculated using the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system. To calculate the patient dose from CBCT, phase-space beams of a CBCT head based on the ELEKTA x-ray volume imaging system were generated using the Monte Carlo BEAMnrc code for 100, 120, 130, and 140 kVp energies. An in-house graphical user interface called DOSCTP (DOSXYZnrc-based) developed using MATLAB was used to calculate the dosemore » distributions due to a 360 deg. photon arc from the CBCT beam with the same patient CT image sets as used in Pinnacle3. The two calculated dose distributions were added together by setting the CBCT doses equal to 1%, 1.5%, 2%, and 2.5% of the prescription dose of the prostate IMRT. The prostate plan and the summed dose distributions were then processed in the CERR platform to determine the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the regions of interest. Moreover, dose profiles along the x- and y-axes crossing the isocenter with and without addition of the CBCT dose were determined. It was found that the added doses due to CBCT are most significant at the femur heads. Higher doses were found at the bones for a relatively low energy CBCT beam such as 100 kVp. Apart from the bones, the CBCT dose was observed to be most concentrated on the anterior and posterior side of the patient anatomy. Analysis of the DVHs for the prostate and other critical tissues showed that they vary only slightly with the added CBCT dose at different beam energies. On the other hand, the changes of the DVHs for the femur heads due to the CBCT dose and beam energy were more significant than those of rectal and bladder wall. By analyzing the vertical and horizontal dose profiles crossing the femur heads and isocenter, with and without the CBCT dose equal to 2% of the prescribed dose, it was found that there is about a 5% increase of dose at the femur head. Still, such an increase in the femur head dose is well below the dose limit of the bone in our IMRT plans. Therefore, under these dose fractionation conditions, it is concluded that, though CBCT causes a higher dose deposited at the bones, there may be no significant effect in the DVHs of critical tissues in the prostate IMRT.« less