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Title: SU-G-TeP3-09: Proton Minibeam Radiation Therapy Increases Normal Tissue Resistance

Abstract

Purpose: The dose tolerances of normal tissues continue being the main limitation in radiotherapy. To overcome it, we recently proposed a novel concept: proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT) [1]. It allies the physical advantages of protons with the normal tissue preservation observed when irradiated with submillimetric spatially fractionated beams (minibeam radiation therapy) [2]. The dose distributions are such that the tumor receives a homogeneous dose distribution, while normal tissues benefit from the spatial fractionation of the dose. The objective of our work was to implement this promising technique at a clinical center (Proton therapy center in Orsay) in order to evaluate the potential gain in tissue sparing. Methods: Dose distributions were measured by means of gafchromic films and a PTW microdiamond detector (60019). Once the dosimetry was established, the whole brain of 7 weeks old male Fischer 344 rats was irradiated. Half of the animals received conventional seamless proton irradiation (25 Gy in one fraction). The other rats were irradiated with pMBRT (58 Gy peak dose in one fraction). The average dose deposited in the same targeted volume was in both cases 25 Gy. Results: The first complete set of dosimetric data in such small proton field sizes was obtainedmore » [3]. Rats treated with conventional proton irradiation exhibited severe moist desquamation and permanent epilation afterwards. The minibeam group, on the other hand, exhibited no skin damage and no clinical symptoms. MRI imaging and histological analysis are planned at 6 months after irradiation. Conclusion: Our preliminary results indicate that pMBRT leads to an increase in tissue resistance. This can open the door to an efficient treatment of very radioresistant tumours. [1] Prezado et al. Med. Phys. 40, 031712, 1–8 (2013).[2] Prezado et al., Rad. Research. 184, 314-21 (2015). [3] Peucelle et al., Med. Phys. 42 7108-13 (2015).« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]; ; ; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. CNRS, Orsay, Ile de France (France)
  2. Institut Curie, Orsay, Ile de France (France)
  3. Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, Ile de France (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649430
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ANIMAL TISSUES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; FRACTIONATION; IRRADIATION; NMR IMAGING; PLANT TISSUES; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSE UNITS; RADIOTHERAPY; RATS

Citation Formats

Prezado, Y, Gonzalez-Infantes, W, Juchaux, M, Martinez-Rovira, I, Peucelle, C, Heinrich, S, Labiod, D, Nauraye, C, Patriarca, A, and Sebrie, C. SU-G-TeP3-09: Proton Minibeam Radiation Therapy Increases Normal Tissue Resistance. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957089.
Prezado, Y, Gonzalez-Infantes, W, Juchaux, M, Martinez-Rovira, I, Peucelle, C, Heinrich, S, Labiod, D, Nauraye, C, Patriarca, A, & Sebrie, C. SU-G-TeP3-09: Proton Minibeam Radiation Therapy Increases Normal Tissue Resistance. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957089.
Prezado, Y, Gonzalez-Infantes, W, Juchaux, M, Martinez-Rovira, I, Peucelle, C, Heinrich, S, Labiod, D, Nauraye, C, Patriarca, A, and Sebrie, C. 2016. "SU-G-TeP3-09: Proton Minibeam Radiation Therapy Increases Normal Tissue Resistance". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957089.
@article{osti_22649430,
title = {SU-G-TeP3-09: Proton Minibeam Radiation Therapy Increases Normal Tissue Resistance},
author = {Prezado, Y and Gonzalez-Infantes, W and Juchaux, M and Martinez-Rovira, I and Peucelle, C and Heinrich, S and Labiod, D and Nauraye, C and Patriarca, A and Sebrie, C},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The dose tolerances of normal tissues continue being the main limitation in radiotherapy. To overcome it, we recently proposed a novel concept: proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT) [1]. It allies the physical advantages of protons with the normal tissue preservation observed when irradiated with submillimetric spatially fractionated beams (minibeam radiation therapy) [2]. The dose distributions are such that the tumor receives a homogeneous dose distribution, while normal tissues benefit from the spatial fractionation of the dose. The objective of our work was to implement this promising technique at a clinical center (Proton therapy center in Orsay) in order to evaluate the potential gain in tissue sparing. Methods: Dose distributions were measured by means of gafchromic films and a PTW microdiamond detector (60019). Once the dosimetry was established, the whole brain of 7 weeks old male Fischer 344 rats was irradiated. Half of the animals received conventional seamless proton irradiation (25 Gy in one fraction). The other rats were irradiated with pMBRT (58 Gy peak dose in one fraction). The average dose deposited in the same targeted volume was in both cases 25 Gy. Results: The first complete set of dosimetric data in such small proton field sizes was obtained [3]. Rats treated with conventional proton irradiation exhibited severe moist desquamation and permanent epilation afterwards. The minibeam group, on the other hand, exhibited no skin damage and no clinical symptoms. MRI imaging and histological analysis are planned at 6 months after irradiation. Conclusion: Our preliminary results indicate that pMBRT leads to an increase in tissue resistance. This can open the door to an efficient treatment of very radioresistant tumours. [1] Prezado et al. Med. Phys. 40, 031712, 1–8 (2013).[2] Prezado et al., Rad. Research. 184, 314-21 (2015). [3] Peucelle et al., Med. Phys. 42 7108-13 (2015).},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957089},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To compare dose volume histograms of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) with those of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) for the treatment of stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to explore the possibility of individualized radical radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Dose volume histograms designed to deliver IMRT at 60 to 63 Gy, PSPT at 74 Gy, and IMPT at the same doses were compared and the use of individualized radical radiotherapy was assessed in patients with extensive stage IIIB NSCLC (n = 10 patients for each approach). These patients were selected based on theirmore » extensive disease and were considered to have no or borderline tolerance to IMRT at 60 to 63 Gy, based on the dose to normal tissue volume constraints (lung volume receiving 20 Gy [V20] of <35%, total mean lung dose <20 Gy; spinal cord dose, <45 Gy). The possibility of increasing the total tumor dose with IMPT for each patient without exceeding the dose volume constraints (maximum tolerated dose [MTD]) was also investigated. Results: Compared with IMRT, IMPT spared more lung, heart, spinal cord, and esophagus, even with dose escalation from 63 Gy to 83.5 Gy, with a mean MTD of 74 Gy. Compared with PSPT, IMPT allowed further dose escalation from 74 Gy to a mean MTD of 84.4 Gy (range, 79.4-88.4 Gy) while all parameters of normal tissue sparing were kept at lower or similar levels. In addition, IMPT prevented lower-dose target coverage in patients with complicated tumor anatomies. Conclusions: IMPT reduces the dose to normal tissue and allows individualized radical radiotherapy for extensive stage IIIB NSCLC.« less
  • Purpose: This Monte Carlo simulation work aims at studying a new radiotherapy approach called proton-minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT). The main objective of this proof of concept was the evaluation of the possible gain in tissue sparing, thanks to the spatial fractionation of the dose, which could be used to deposit higher and potentially curative doses in clinical cases where tissue tolerances are a limit for conventional methods. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (GATE v.6) have been used as a method to calculate the ratio of the peak-to-valley doses (PVDR) for arrays of proton minibeams of 0.7 mm width and several center-to-centermore » distances, at different depths in a water phantom. The beam penumbras were also evaluated as an important parameter for tissue sparing, for example, in the treatment of non-cancer diseases like epilepsy. Two proton energies were considered in this study: a clinically relevant energy (105 MeV) and a very high energy (1 GeV), to benefit from a reduced lateral scattering. For the latter case, an interlaced geometry was also evaluated. Results: Higher or similar PVDR than the ones obtained in x-rays minibeam radiation therapy were achieved in several pMBRT configurations. In addition, for the two energies studied, the beam penumbras are smaller than in the case of Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Conclusions: The high PVDR obtained for some configurations and the small penumbras in comparison with existing radiosurgery techniques, suggest a potential gain in healthy tissue sparing in this new technique. Biological studies are warranted to assess the effects of pMBRT on both normal and tumoral tissues.« less
  • Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT) is a new radiotherapy (RT) approach that allies the inherent physical advantages of protons with the normal tissue preservation observed when irradiated with submillimetric spatially fractionated beams. This dosimetry work aims at demonstrating the feasibility of the technical implementation of pMBRT. This has been performed at the Institut Curie - Proton Therapy Center in Orsay. Methods: Proton minibeams (400 and 700 μm-width) were generated by means of a brass multislit collimator. Center-to-center distances between consecutive beams of 3200 and 3500 μm, respectively, were employed. The (passive scattered) beam energy was 100 MeV corresponding tomore » a range of 7.7 cm water equivalent. Absolute dosimetry was performed with a thimble ionization chamber (IBA CC13) in a water tank. Relative dosimetry was carried out irradiating radiochromic films interspersed in a IBA RW3 slab phantom. Depth dose curves and lateral profiles at different depths were evaluated. Peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR), beam widths, and output factors were also assessed as a function of depth. Results: A pattern of peaks and valleys was maintained in the transverse direction with PVDR values decreasing as a function of depth until 6.7 cm. From that depth, the transverse dose profiles became homogeneous due to multiple Coulomb scattering. Peak-to-valley dose ratio values extended from 8.2 ± 0.5 at the phantom surface to 1.08 ± 0.06 at the Bragg peak. This was the first time that dosimetry in such small proton field sizes was performed. Despite the challenge, a complete set of dosimetric data needed to guide the first biological experiments was achieved. Conclusions: pMBRT is a novel strategy in order to reduce the side effects of RT. This works provides the experimental proof of concept of this new RT method: clinical proton beams might allow depositing a (high) uniform dose in a brain tumor located in the center of the brain (7.5 cm depth, the worst scenario), while a spatial fractionation of the dose is retained in the normal tissues in the beam path, potentially leading to a gain in tissue sparing. This is the first complete experimental implementation of this promising technique. Biological experiments are needed in order to confirm the clinical potential of pMBRT.« less
  • Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy is a novel approach to minimize normal tissue damage in the entrance channel by spatial fractionation while keeping tumor control through a homogeneous tumor dose using beam widening with an increasing track length. In the present study, the dose distributions for homogeneous broad beam and minibeam irradiation sessions were simulated. Also, in an animal study, acute normal tissue side effects of proton minibeam irradiation were compared with homogeneous irradiation in a tumor-free mouse ear model to account for the complex effects on the immune system and vasculature in an in vivo normal tissue model. Methods andmore » Materials: At the ion microprobe SNAKE, 20-MeV protons were administered to the central part (7.2 × 7.2 mm{sup 2}) of the ear of BALB/c mice, using either a homogeneous field with a dose of 60 Gy or 16 minibeams with a nominal 6000 Gy (4 × 4 minibeams, size 0.18 × 0.18 mm{sup 2}, with a distance of 1.8 mm). The same average dose was used over the irradiated area. Results: No ear swelling or other skin reactions were observed at any point after minibeam irradiation. In contrast, significant ear swelling (up to fourfold), erythema, and desquamation developed in homogeneously irradiated ears 3 to 4 weeks after irradiation. Hair loss and the disappearance of sebaceous glands were only detected in the homogeneously irradiated fields. Conclusions: These results show that proton minibeam radiation therapy results in reduced adverse effects compared with conventional homogeneous broad-beam irradiation and, therefore, might have the potential to decrease the incidence of side effects resulting from clinical proton and/or heavy ion therapy.« less
  • Purpose: To compare dose-volume histograms (DVH) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by photon or proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Dose-volume histograms were compared between photon, including three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and proton plans at doses of 66 Gy, 87.5 Gy in Stage I (n = 10) and 60-63 Gy, and 74 Gy in Stage III (n 15). Results: For Stage I, the mean total lung V5, V10, and V20 were 31.8%, 24.6%, and 15.8%, respectively, for photon 3D-CRT with 66 Gy, whereas they were 13.4%, 12.3%, and 10.9%, respectively, with proton withmore » dose escalation to 87.5 cobalt Gray equivalents (CGE) (p = 0.002). For Stage III, the mean total lung V5, V10, and V20 were 54.1%, 46.9%, and 34.8%, respectively, for photon 3D-CRT with 63 Gy, whereas they were 39.7%, 36.6%, and 31.6%, respectively, for proton with dose escalation to 74 CGE (p = 0.002). In all cases, the doses to lung, spinal cord, heart, esophagus, and integral dose were lower with proton therapy even compared with IMRT. Conclusions: Proton treatment appears to reduce dose to normal tissues significantly, even with dose escalation, compared with standard-dose photon therapy, either 3D-CRT or IMRT.« less