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Title: SU-G-IeP3-10: Molecular Imaging with Clinical X-Ray Sources and Compton Cameras

Abstract

Purpose: The application of Compton cameras (CC) is a novel approach translating XFCT to a practical modality realized with clinical CT systems without the restriction of pencil beams. The dual modality design offers additional information without extra patient dose. The purpose of this work is to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of using CCs for volumetric x-ray fluorescence (XF) imaging by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and statistical image reconstruction. Methods: The feasibility of a CC for imaging x-ray fluorescence emitted from targeted lesions is examined by MC simulations. 3 mm diameter water spheres with various gold concentrations and detector distances are placed inside the lung of an adult human phantom (MIRD) and are irradiated with both fan and cone-beam geometries. A sandwich design CC composed of Silicon and CdTe is used to image the gold nanoparticle distribution. The detection system comprises four 16×26 cm{sup 2} detector panels placed on the chest of a MIRD phantom. Constraints of energy-, spatial-resolution, clinical geometries and Doppler broadening are taken into account. Image reconstruction is performed with a list-mode MLEM algorithm with cone-projector on a GPU. Results: The comparison of reconstruction of cone- and fan-beam excitation shows that the spatial resolution is improved bymore » 23% for fan-beams with significantly decreased processing time. Cone-beam excitation increases scatter content disturbing quantification of lesions near the body surface. Spatial resolution and detectability limit in the center of the lung is 8.7 mm and 20 fM for 50 nm diameter gold nanoparticles at 20 mGy. Conclusion: The implementation of XFCT with a CC is a feasible method for molecular imaging with high atomic number probes. Given constrains of detector resolutions, Doppler broadening, and limited exposure dose, spatial resolutions comparable with PET and molecular sensitivities in the fM range are realizable with current detector technology.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649403
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CADMIUM TELLURIDES; CAMERAS; GOLD; IMAGE PROCESSING; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NANOPARTICLES; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Vernekohl, D, Ahmad, M, Chinn, G, and Xing, L. SU-G-IeP3-10: Molecular Imaging with Clinical X-Ray Sources and Compton Cameras. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957059.
Vernekohl, D, Ahmad, M, Chinn, G, & Xing, L. SU-G-IeP3-10: Molecular Imaging with Clinical X-Ray Sources and Compton Cameras. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957059.
Vernekohl, D, Ahmad, M, Chinn, G, and Xing, L. Wed . "SU-G-IeP3-10: Molecular Imaging with Clinical X-Ray Sources and Compton Cameras". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957059.
@article{osti_22649403,
title = {SU-G-IeP3-10: Molecular Imaging with Clinical X-Ray Sources and Compton Cameras},
author = {Vernekohl, D and Ahmad, M and Chinn, G and Xing, L},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The application of Compton cameras (CC) is a novel approach translating XFCT to a practical modality realized with clinical CT systems without the restriction of pencil beams. The dual modality design offers additional information without extra patient dose. The purpose of this work is to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of using CCs for volumetric x-ray fluorescence (XF) imaging by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and statistical image reconstruction. Methods: The feasibility of a CC for imaging x-ray fluorescence emitted from targeted lesions is examined by MC simulations. 3 mm diameter water spheres with various gold concentrations and detector distances are placed inside the lung of an adult human phantom (MIRD) and are irradiated with both fan and cone-beam geometries. A sandwich design CC composed of Silicon and CdTe is used to image the gold nanoparticle distribution. The detection system comprises four 16×26 cm{sup 2} detector panels placed on the chest of a MIRD phantom. Constraints of energy-, spatial-resolution, clinical geometries and Doppler broadening are taken into account. Image reconstruction is performed with a list-mode MLEM algorithm with cone-projector on a GPU. Results: The comparison of reconstruction of cone- and fan-beam excitation shows that the spatial resolution is improved by 23% for fan-beams with significantly decreased processing time. Cone-beam excitation increases scatter content disturbing quantification of lesions near the body surface. Spatial resolution and detectability limit in the center of the lung is 8.7 mm and 20 fM for 50 nm diameter gold nanoparticles at 20 mGy. Conclusion: The implementation of XFCT with a CC is a feasible method for molecular imaging with high atomic number probes. Given constrains of detector resolutions, Doppler broadening, and limited exposure dose, spatial resolutions comparable with PET and molecular sensitivities in the fM range are realizable with current detector technology.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957059},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}