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Title: SU-G-TeP2-13: Patient-Specific Reduction of Range Uncertainties in Proton Therapy by Proton Radiography with a Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber

Abstract

Purpose: The conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) to stopping powers is a major source of range uncertainty in proton therapy (PT). Our contribution shows how proton radiographs (PR) acquired with a multi-layer ionization chamber in a PT center can be used for accurate patient positioning and subsequently for patient-specific optimization of the conversion from HU to stopping powers. Methods: A multi-layer ionization chamber was used to measure the integral depth-dose (IDD) of 220 MeV pencil beam spots passing through several anthropomorphic phantoms. The whole area of interest was imaged by repositioning the couch and by acquiring a 45×45 mm{sup 2} frame for each position. A rigid registration algorithm was implemented to correct the positioning error between the proton radiographs and the planning CT. After registration, the stopping power map obtained from the planning CT with the calibration curve of the treatment planning system was used together with the water equivalent thickness gained from two proton radiographs to generate a phantom-specific stopping power map. Results: Our results show that it is possible to make a registration with submillimeter accuracy from proton radiography obtained by sending beamlets separated by more than 1 mm. This was made possible by the complex shape ofmore » the IDD due to the presence of lateral heterogeneities along the path of the beam. Submillimeter positioning was still possible with a 5 mm spot spacing. Phantom specific stopping power maps obtained by minimizing the range error were cross-verified by the acquisition of an additional proton radiography where the phantom was positioned in a random but known manner. Conclusion: Our results indicate that a CT-PR registration algorithm together with range-error based optimization can be used to produce a patient-specific stopping power map. Sylvain Deffet reports financial funding of its PhD thesis by Ion Beam Applications (IBA) during the confines of the study and outside the submitted work. Francois Vander Stappen reports being employed by Ion Beam Applications (IBA) during the confines of the study and outside the submitted work.« less

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)
  2. Trento Hospital / APSS, Trento (Italy)
  3. Ion Beam Applications (IBA), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649393
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; IMAGES; ION BEAMS; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; MEV RANGE 100-1000; PHANTOMS; PLANNING; POSITIONING; PROTON BEAMS; PROTON RADIOGRAPHY; RADIOTHERAPY; STOPPING POWER

Citation Formats

Deffet, S, Macq, B, Farace, P, Righetto, R, and Vander Stappen, F. SU-G-TeP2-13: Patient-Specific Reduction of Range Uncertainties in Proton Therapy by Proton Radiography with a Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957048.
Deffet, S, Macq, B, Farace, P, Righetto, R, & Vander Stappen, F. SU-G-TeP2-13: Patient-Specific Reduction of Range Uncertainties in Proton Therapy by Proton Radiography with a Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957048.
Deffet, S, Macq, B, Farace, P, Righetto, R, and Vander Stappen, F. Wed . "SU-G-TeP2-13: Patient-Specific Reduction of Range Uncertainties in Proton Therapy by Proton Radiography with a Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957048.
@article{osti_22649393,
title = {SU-G-TeP2-13: Patient-Specific Reduction of Range Uncertainties in Proton Therapy by Proton Radiography with a Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber},
author = {Deffet, S and Macq, B and Farace, P and Righetto, R and Vander Stappen, F},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) to stopping powers is a major source of range uncertainty in proton therapy (PT). Our contribution shows how proton radiographs (PR) acquired with a multi-layer ionization chamber in a PT center can be used for accurate patient positioning and subsequently for patient-specific optimization of the conversion from HU to stopping powers. Methods: A multi-layer ionization chamber was used to measure the integral depth-dose (IDD) of 220 MeV pencil beam spots passing through several anthropomorphic phantoms. The whole area of interest was imaged by repositioning the couch and by acquiring a 45×45 mm{sup 2} frame for each position. A rigid registration algorithm was implemented to correct the positioning error between the proton radiographs and the planning CT. After registration, the stopping power map obtained from the planning CT with the calibration curve of the treatment planning system was used together with the water equivalent thickness gained from two proton radiographs to generate a phantom-specific stopping power map. Results: Our results show that it is possible to make a registration with submillimeter accuracy from proton radiography obtained by sending beamlets separated by more than 1 mm. This was made possible by the complex shape of the IDD due to the presence of lateral heterogeneities along the path of the beam. Submillimeter positioning was still possible with a 5 mm spot spacing. Phantom specific stopping power maps obtained by minimizing the range error were cross-verified by the acquisition of an additional proton radiography where the phantom was positioned in a random but known manner. Conclusion: Our results indicate that a CT-PR registration algorithm together with range-error based optimization can be used to produce a patient-specific stopping power map. Sylvain Deffet reports financial funding of its PhD thesis by Ion Beam Applications (IBA) during the confines of the study and outside the submitted work. Francois Vander Stappen reports being employed by Ion Beam Applications (IBA) during the confines of the study and outside the submitted work.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957048},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • To present two related developments of proton radiography (pRad) to minimize range uncertainty in proton therapy. The first combines a pRad with an X-ray CT to produce a patient-specific relative stopping power (RSP) map. The second aims to improve the pRad spatial resolution for accurate registration prior to the first. The enhanced-pRad can also be used in a novel proton-CT reconstruction algorithm. Monte Carlo pRad were computed from three phantoms; the Gammex, the Catphan and an anthropomorphic head. An optimized cubic-spline estimator derives the most likely path. The length crossed by the protons voxel-by-voxel was calculated by combining their estimatedmore » paths with the CT. The difference between the theoretical (length×RSP) and measured energy loss was minimized through a least squares optimization (LSO) algorithm yielding the RSP map. To increase pRad spatial resolution for registration with the CT, the phantom was discretized into voxels columns. The average column RSP was optimized to maximize the proton energy loss likelihood (MLE). Simulations showed precise RSP (<0.75%) for Gammex materials except low-density lung (<1.2%). For the head, accurate RSP were obtained (µ=−0.10%1.5σ=1.12%) and the range precision was improved (ΔR80 of −0.20±0.35%). Spatial resolution was increased in pRad (2.75 to 6.71 lp/cm) and pCT from MLE-enhanced pRad (2.83 to 5.86 lp/cm). The LSO decreases the range uncertainty (R80σ<1.0%) while the MLE-enhanced pRad spatial resolution (+244%) and is a great candidate for pCT reconstruction.« less
  • Purpose: We present an improved method to calculate patient-specific calibration curves to convert X-ray computed tomography (CT) Hounsfield Unit (HU) to relative stopping powers (RSP) for proton therapy treatment planning. Methods: By optimizing the HU-RSP calibration curve, the difference between a proton radiographic image and a digitally reconstructed X-ray radiography (DRR) is minimized. The feasibility of this approach has previously been demonstrated. This scenario assumes that all discrepancies between proton radiography and DRR originate from uncertainties in the HU-RSP curve. In reality, external factors cause imperfections in the proton radiography, such as misalignment compared to the DRR and unfaithful representationmore » of geometric structures (“blurring”). We analyze these effects based on synthetic datasets of anthropomorphic phantoms and suggest an extended optimization scheme which explicitly accounts for these effects. Performance of the method is been tested for various simulated irradiation parameters. The ultimate purpose of the optimization is to minimize uncertainties in the HU-RSP calibration curve. We therefore suggest and perform a thorough statistical treatment to quantify the accuracy of the optimized HU-RSP curve. Results: We demonstrate that without extending the optimization scheme, spatial blurring (equivalent to FWHM=3mm convolution) in the proton radiographies can cause up to 10% deviation between the optimized and the ground truth HU-RSP calibration curve. Instead, results obtained with our extended method reach 1% or better correspondence. We have further calculated gamma index maps for different acceptance levels. With DTA=0.5mm and RD=0.5%, a passing ratio of 100% is obtained with the extended method, while an optimization neglecting effects of spatial blurring only reach ∼90%. Conclusion: Our contribution underlines the potential of a single proton radiography to generate a patient-specific calibration curve and to improve dose delivery by optimizing the HU-RSP calibration curve as long as all sources of systematic incongruence are properly modeled.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a commercial plastic scintillator detector (PSD) for small-field stereotactic patient-specific quality assurance using flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams. Methods: A total of ten spherical targets (volume range:[0.03cc–2cc]) were planned using Dynamic Conformal Arc(DCA-10 plans) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy(VMAT-10 plans) techniques in Eclipse(AAA v.11, 1mm dose calculation grid size). Additionally, 15 previously-treated cranial and spine SRS plans were evaluated (6 DCA, 9 VMAT, volume range:[0.04cc–119.02cc]). All measurements were acquired using Varian Edge equipped with HDMLC. Three detectors were used: PinPoint ion chamber (PTW;active volume 0.015cc), Exradin W1 PSD (Standard Imaging;active volume 0.002cc), and Gafchromic EBT3 filmmore » (Ashland). PinPoint and PSD were positioned perpendicular to beam axis in a Lucy phantom (Standard Imaging). Films were placed at isocenter in solid water. Calibration films were delivered for absolute dose analysis. Results: For large spherical targets(>1.5cc) with DCA, all detectors agreed within 1% of AAA calculations. As target volume decreased, PSD measured higher doses than AAA (maximum difference: 3.3% at 0.03cc target), while PinPoint chamber measured lower doses (maximum difference:-3.8% at 0.03cc target). Inter-detector differences between pinpoint and PSD increased with decreasing target size; differences>5% were observed for targets<0.09cc. Similar trends for inter-detector behavior were observed for clinical plans. For target sizes<0.08cc, PSD measured>5% higher dose than PinPoint chamber (maximum difference: 9.25% at 0.04cc target). Film demonstrated agreement of −0.19±1.47% with PSD for all spherical targets, and agreement within −0.98±2.25% for all 15 clinical targets. Unlike DCA, VMAT plans did not show improved AAA-to-detector agreements for large targets. Conclusion: For all targets, the PSD measurements agreed with film within 1.0%, on average. For small volume targets (<0.10cc), PSD agreed with film but measured significantly higher doses (>5%) compared with the pin point ion chamber. The plastic scintillator detector appears to be suitable for accurate measurements of small SRS targets.« less
  • Purpose: We propose to apply a probabilistic framework, namely chanceconstrained optimization, in the intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) planning subject to range and patient setup uncertainties. The purpose is to hedge against the influence of uncertainties and improve robustness of treatment plans. Methods: IMPT plans were generated for a typical prostate patient. Nine dose distributions are computed — the nominal one and one each for ±5mm setup uncertainties along three cardinal axes and for ±3.5% range uncertainty. These nine dose distributions are supplied to the solver CPLEX as chance constraints to explicitly control plan robustness under these representative uncertainty scenarios withmore » certain probability. This probability is determined by the tolerance level. We make the chance-constrained model tractable by converting it to a mixed integer optimization problem. The quality of plans derived from this method is evaluated using dose-volume histogram (DVH) indices such as tumor dose homogeneity (D5% – D95%) and coverage (D95%) and normal tissue sparing like V70 of rectum, V65, and V40 of bladder. We also compare the results from this novel method with the conventional PTV-based method to further demonstrate its effectiveness Results: Our model can yield clinically acceptable plans within 50 seconds. The chance-constrained optimization produces IMPT plans with comparable target coverage, better target dose homogeneity, and better normal tissue sparing compared to the PTV-based optimization [D95% CTV: 67.9 vs 68.7 (Gy), D5% – D95% CTV: 11.9 vs 18 (Gy), V70 rectum: 0.0 % vs 0.33%, V65 bladder: 2.17% vs 9.33%, V40 bladder: 8.83% vs 21.83%]. It also simultaneously makes the plan more robust [Width of DVH band at D50%: 2.0 vs 10.0 (Gy)]. The tolerance level may be varied to control the tradeoff between plan robustness and quality. Conclusion: The chance-constrained optimization generates superior IMPT plan compared to the PTV-based optimization with explicit control of plan robustness. NIH/NCI K25CA168984, Eagles Cancer Research Career Development, The Lawrence W. and Marilyn W. Matteson Fund for Cancer Research, Mayo ASU Seed Grant, and The Kemper Marley Foundation.« less
  • Purpose: Proton radiotherapy allows radiation treatment delivery with high dose gradients. The nature of such dose distributions increases the influence of patient positioning uncertainties on their fidelity when compared to photon radiotherapy. The present work quantitatively analyzes the influence of setup uncertainties on proton range and dose distributions. Methods: 38 clinical passive scattering treatment fields for small lesions in the head were studied. Dose distributions for shifted and rotated patient positions were Monte Carlo-simulated. Proton range uncertainties at the 50% and 90%-dose falloff position were calculated considering 18 arbitrary combinations of maximal patient position shifts and rotations for two patientmore » positioning methods. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs), equivalent uniform doses (EUDs) and tumor control probabilities (TCPs) were studied for organs at risk (OARs) and target volumes of eight patients. Results: We identified a median 1σ proton range uncertainty at the 50%-dose falloff of 2.8 mm for anatomy-based patient positioning and 1.6 mm for fiducial-based patient positioning as well as 7.2 mm and 5.8 mm for the 90%-dose falloff position respectively. These range uncertainties were correlated to heterogeneity indices (HIs) calculated for each treatment field (38% < R{sup 2} < 50%). A NTCP increase of more than 10% (absolute) was observed for less than 2.9% (anatomy-based positioning) and 1.2% (fiducial-based positioning) of the studied OARs and patient shifts. TCP decreases larger than 10% (absolute) were seen for less than 2.2% of the target volumes or non-existent. EUD changes were up to 178% for OARs and 35% for target volumes. Conclusion: The influence of patient positioning uncertainties on proton range in therapy of small lesions in the human brain and target and OAR dosimetry were studied. Observed range uncertainties were correlated with HIs. The clinical practice of using multiple compensator-smeared treatment beams selected to avoid distal OAR sparing is considered to be safe. J. L. was supported by a scholarship of the University of Vienna.« less