skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-G-TeP2-07: Dosimetric Characterization of a New HDR Multi-Channel Esophageal Applicator for Brachytherapy

Abstract

Purpose: To characterize the dose distribution of a new multi-channel esophageal applicator for brachytherapy HDR treatment, and particularly the effect of the presence of air or water in the applicator’s expansion balloon. Methods: A new multi-channel (6) inflatable applicator for esophageal HDR has been developed in house and tested in a simple water phantom. CT image sets were obtained under several balloon expansions (80ml of air, 50 cc of water), and channel loadings and used with the Oncentra (Elekta) planning system based on TG43 formalism. 400 cGy was prescribed to a plane 1cm away from the applicator. Planar dose distributions were measured for that plane and one next to the applicator using Gafchromic EBT3 film and scanned by a Vidar VXR-12 film digitizer. Film and TPS generated dose distributions of film were sent to OmniPro I’mRT (iba DOSIMETRY) for analysis. 2D dose profiles in both X and Y directions were compared and gamma analysis performed. Results: Film dose measurement of the air-inflated applicator is lower than the TPS calculated dose by as much as 60%. Only 80.8% of the pixels passed the gamma criteria (3%/3mm). For the water-inflated applicator, the measured film dose is fairly close to the TPS calculatedmore » dose (typically within <3%). 99.84% of the pixels passed the gamma criteria (3%/3mm). Conclusion: TG43 based calculations worked well when water was used in the expansion balloon. However, when air is present in that balloon, the neglect of heterogeneity corrections in the TG43 calculation results in large differences between calculated and measured doses. This could result in severe underdosing when used in a patient. This study illustrates the need for a TPS with an advanced algorithm which can account for heterogeneity. Supported by Innovations Department, Cleveland Clinic.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)
  2. Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649387
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BALLOONS; BRACHYTHERAPY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DOSIMETRY; ESOPHAGUS; EXPANSION; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; WATER

Citation Formats

Zhao, A, Gao, S, Greskovich, J, Wilkinson, D, and Diener, T. SU-G-TeP2-07: Dosimetric Characterization of a New HDR Multi-Channel Esophageal Applicator for Brachytherapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957042.
Zhao, A, Gao, S, Greskovich, J, Wilkinson, D, & Diener, T. SU-G-TeP2-07: Dosimetric Characterization of a New HDR Multi-Channel Esophageal Applicator for Brachytherapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957042.
Zhao, A, Gao, S, Greskovich, J, Wilkinson, D, and Diener, T. 2016. "SU-G-TeP2-07: Dosimetric Characterization of a New HDR Multi-Channel Esophageal Applicator for Brachytherapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957042.
@article{osti_22649387,
title = {SU-G-TeP2-07: Dosimetric Characterization of a New HDR Multi-Channel Esophageal Applicator for Brachytherapy},
author = {Zhao, A and Gao, S and Greskovich, J and Wilkinson, D and Diener, T},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To characterize the dose distribution of a new multi-channel esophageal applicator for brachytherapy HDR treatment, and particularly the effect of the presence of air or water in the applicator’s expansion balloon. Methods: A new multi-channel (6) inflatable applicator for esophageal HDR has been developed in house and tested in a simple water phantom. CT image sets were obtained under several balloon expansions (80ml of air, 50 cc of water), and channel loadings and used with the Oncentra (Elekta) planning system based on TG43 formalism. 400 cGy was prescribed to a plane 1cm away from the applicator. Planar dose distributions were measured for that plane and one next to the applicator using Gafchromic EBT3 film and scanned by a Vidar VXR-12 film digitizer. Film and TPS generated dose distributions of film were sent to OmniPro I’mRT (iba DOSIMETRY) for analysis. 2D dose profiles in both X and Y directions were compared and gamma analysis performed. Results: Film dose measurement of the air-inflated applicator is lower than the TPS calculated dose by as much as 60%. Only 80.8% of the pixels passed the gamma criteria (3%/3mm). For the water-inflated applicator, the measured film dose is fairly close to the TPS calculated dose (typically within <3%). 99.84% of the pixels passed the gamma criteria (3%/3mm). Conclusion: TG43 based calculations worked well when water was used in the expansion balloon. However, when air is present in that balloon, the neglect of heterogeneity corrections in the TG43 calculation results in large differences between calculated and measured doses. This could result in severe underdosing when used in a patient. This study illustrates the need for a TPS with an advanced algorithm which can account for heterogeneity. Supported by Innovations Department, Cleveland Clinic.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957042},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • The dosimetric properties of a novel intracavitary mold applicator for {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) endorectal cancer treatment have been investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and experimental methods. The 28 cm long applicator has a flexible structure made of silicone rubber for easy passage into cavities with deep-seated tumors. It consists of eight source catheters arranged around a central cavity for shielding insertion, and is compatible for use with an endocavitary balloon. A phase space model of the HDR source has been validated for dose calculations using the GEANT4 MC code. GAFCHROMIC trade mark sign EBT model filmmore » was used to measure dose distributions in water around shielded and unshielded applicators with two loading configurations, and to quantify the shielding effect of a balloon injected with an iodine solution (300 mg I/mL). The film calibration procedure was performed in water using an {sup 192}Ir HDR source. Ionization chamber measurements in a Lucite phantom show that placing a tungsten rod in the applicator attenuates the dose in the shielded region by up to 85%. Inserting the shielded applicator into a water-filled balloon pushes the neighboring tissues away from the radiation source, and the resulting geometric displacement reduces the dose by up to 53%; another 8% dose reduction can be achieved when the balloon is injected with an iodine solution. All experimental results agree with the GEANT4 calculations within measurement uncertainties.« less
  • Purpose: To characterize the dosimetric properties/distributions of the novel proposed direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator in combination with 192Ir HDR source, and compare against conventional tandem design, using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The proposed DMBT tandem applicator is designed for image-guided adaptive brachytherapy, especially MRI, of cervical cancer. It has 6 peripheral holes of 1.3-mm width, grooved along a 5.4-mm diameter nonmagnetic tungsten alloy rod of density 18.0 g/cc, capable of generating directional dose profiles – leading to enhanced dose sculpting capacity through inverse planning. In-water dosimetric parameters for the DMBT and conventional tandems have been calculated for variousmore » radial distances away and around the tandems. For the DMBT tandem, the cumulative dose from the 192Ir source occupying 1) one and 2) all six holes in equal dwell times was calculated and normalized to match the dose rate of the open source (in conventional tandem) at 1 cm from the center. This is done to compare and contrast the characteristic dose distributions to that of the isotropic TG43-based 192Ir source. Results: All dose rates were normalized at 1-cm radius from the center of the applicators, containing source(s). The normalized dose rates at 0.5, 3.0, and 5.0-cm radiuses were then 388, 11.3, and 4.1% for conventional tandem, 657, 8.1, and 2.7% for DMBT tandem with the source in one hole at front entrance, and 436, 10.9, and 3.8% for DMBT tandem with the source in all six holes. For the DMBT tandem case with the source in one hole, the backside transmissions were 47, 2.4, and 0.9%, respectively. Conclusion: The DMBT tandem is able to generate closely similar dosimetric characteristics as that of the single-channel conventional tandem if needed (with the source occupying all six holes), at the same time, generate directional radiation profile(s) for favorably enabling 3D dose sculpting capability.« less
  • Purpose: To compare the dose of an in-house 3D-printed gynecology applicator (TMHGA) for vaginal vault recurrence of corpus cancer patients after operation for high dose rate brachytherapy treatment with commercially available applicators. Methods: A newly designed applicator is made from 3D-printing methods using ABSM30i. The isodose of the applicator is compared with Elekta multi-channel (MC) applicator and titanium Rotterdam applicator with coupling central tube and vaginal cylinder (RC). Three plans are created using three applicators in a CT set of water phantom. The applicators are anchored using the applicator library and implant library in the Elekta Oncentra treatment planning systemmore » (ver.4.5). The rectum is mimicked by creating a 2cm diameter cylinder, with a distance 1mm posteriorly away from the high risk CTV (HR-CTV). Similarly, the bladder is replicated by a 6cm diameter cylinder with distance 1mm anteriorly from the HR-CTV. Three plans are all normalized 1.5cm superior, 0.5cm anterior and 0.5cm posterior of the applicator surface. By fixing D90 of HR-CTV to 6Gy, the D2cc of rectum and bladder of three plans are compared. Results: The D2cc of the bladder for using TMHGA is lower than MC and RC by 14.0% and 11.9% respectively. While the D2cc of the rectum for using TMHGA is lower than MC and RC by 18.9% and 12.4% respectively. The total treatment time of TMHGA plan is shorter than MC and RC by 11.2% and 12.9%. Conclusion: The applicator created via 3D printing delivers a lower dose to the bladder and the rectum while keeping the same coverage to HR-CTV as other commercially available applicators. Additionally, the new applicator resulted in a reduction of treatment time, which is always welcome.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the possibility of a fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FCRS) for in vivo dose verification in proton therapy. Methods: The Cerenkov radiation due to the proton beam was measured using a homemade phantom, consisting of a plastic optical fiber (POF, PGSCD1001-13-E, Toray, Tokyo, Japan) connected to each channel of a multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT:H7546, Hamamatsu Photonics, Shizuoka, Japan). Data were acquired using a multi-anode photomultiplier tube with the NI-DAQ system (National Instruments Texas, USA). The real-time monitoring graphic user interface was programmed using Labview. The FCRS was analyzed for its dosimetrics characteristic in proton beam. To determine themore » accuracy of the FCRS in proton dose measurements, we compared the ionization chamber dose measurements using a water phantom. We investigated the feasibility of the FCRS for the measurement of dose distributions near the superficial region for proton plans with a varying separation between the target volume and the surface of 3 patients using a humanoid phantom. Results: The dose-response has good linearity. Dose-rate and energy dependence were found to be within 1%. Depth-dose distributions in non-modulated proton beams obtained with the FCRS was in good agreement with the depth-dose measurements from the ionization chamber. To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy of the FCRS, the difference of isocenter dose between the delivery dose calculated by the treatment planning system and that measured by the FCRS was within 3%. With in vivo dosimetry using the humanoid phantom, the calculated surface doses overestimated measurements by 4%–8% using FCRS. Conclusion: In previous study, our results indicate that the performance of the array-type FCRS was comparable to that of the currently used a multi-layer ion chamber system. In this study, we also believe that the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor has considerable potential for use with in vivo patient proton dosimetry.« less
  • In nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) intracavitary brachytherapy, an anatomical dose reference point (in line with that for gynecology work), e.g., at the sphenoid floor, is more precise than the empirical point of 1 cm from the source. However, such increases of the single-source-plan treatment distances may deliver excessive doses inferiorly, to the soft palate. As shielding may help, its efficacy was studied by Monte Carlo simulations in water for 20 and 30 mm diameter spherical NP applicators (representing extremes of sizes for the small NP cavity), with/without lead shielding inferiorly, using a single linear Ir-192, 2 mm steps, equal dwell timesmore » for 5 (5DP) and 9 dwell positions (9DP). Dose reductions of the selected points of interest ranged from 1.2% to 40.5% for the 20 mm shielded applicator and a range of 2.9% to 17.9%, for the 30 mm shielded applicator. Dose volume histograms of the 'region of interest' (ROI) - a cuboid of 4x4x0.5 cm{sup 3} at the most inferior aspect of the applicator, also differed significantly. The highest doses of the 50% (D{sub 50}) and 20% (D{sub 20}) volumes of ROI (for 5DP and 9DP plans) were reduced by 11.9% to 17.9% for the 20 mm applicator and a range of 9.0% to 11.5% for the 30 mm shielded applicator. Doses in unshielded directions were insignificantly changed, for example, with a 20 mm applicator simulated in a 5DP plan, the dose distribution close to the source in the unshielded direction has less than 4% difference at the 50% isodose relative to the dose prescription point. For the 30 mm shielded applicator, despite smaller dose reduction percentages, a more pronounced effective dose reduction was obtained than nominal values when considering radiobiological equivalent doses. Our system was demonstrated to be ready for clinical assessment.« less