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Title: SU-G-JeP2-04: Comparison Between Fricke-Type 3D Radiochromic Dosimeters for Real-Time Dose Distribution Measurements in MR-Guided Radiation Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: To assess MR signal contrast for different ferrous ion compounds used in Fricke-type gel dosimeters for real-time dose measurements for MR-guided radiation therapy applications. Methods: Fricke-type gel dosimeters were prepared in 4% w/w gelatin prior to irradiation in an integrated 1.5 T MRI and 7 MV linear accelerator system (MR-Linac). 4 different ferrous ion (Fe2?) compounds (referred to as A, B, C, and D) were investigated for this study. Dosimeter D consisted of ferrous ammonium sulfate (FAS), which is conventionally used for Fricke dosimeters. Approximately half of each cylindrical dosimeter (45 mm diameter, 80 mm length) was irradiated to ∼17 Gy. MR imaging during irradiation was performed with the MR-Linac using a balanced-FFE sequence of TR/TE = 5/2.4 ms. An approximate uncertainty of 5% in our dose delivery was anticipated since the MR-Linac had not yet been fully commissioned. Results: The signal intensities (SI) increased between the un-irradiated and irradiated regions by approximately 8.6%, 4.4%, 3.2%, and 4.3% after delivery of ∼2.8 Gy for dosimeters A, B, C, and D, respectively. After delivery of ∼17 Gy, the SI had increased by 24.4%, 21.0%, 3.1%, and 22.2% compared to the un-irradiated regions. The increase in SI with respect to dosemore » was linear for dosimeters A, B, and D with slopes of 0.0164, 0.0251, and 0.0236 Gy{sup −1} (R{sup 2} = 0.92, 0.97, and 0.96), respectively. Visually, dosimeter A had the greatest optical contrast from yellow to purple in the irradiated region. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the feasibility of using Fricke-type dosimeters for real-time dose measurements with the greatest optical and MR contrast for dosimeter A. We also demonstrated the need to investigate Fe{sup 2+} compounds beyond the conventionally utilized FAS compound in order to improve the MR signal contrast in 3D dosimeters used for MR-guided radiation therapy. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. LH- 102SPS.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  2. MR Therapy, Philips healthTech, Cleveland, OH (United States)
  3. The University of South Australia, South Australia, SA (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649370
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; AMMONIUM SULFATES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; DOSEMETERS; IRON IONS; IRRADIATION; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; NMR IMAGING; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Lee, H, Alqathami, M, Wang, J, Ibbott, G, Kadbi, M, and Blencowe, A. SU-G-JeP2-04: Comparison Between Fricke-Type 3D Radiochromic Dosimeters for Real-Time Dose Distribution Measurements in MR-Guided Radiation Therapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957024.
Lee, H, Alqathami, M, Wang, J, Ibbott, G, Kadbi, M, & Blencowe, A. SU-G-JeP2-04: Comparison Between Fricke-Type 3D Radiochromic Dosimeters for Real-Time Dose Distribution Measurements in MR-Guided Radiation Therapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957024.
Lee, H, Alqathami, M, Wang, J, Ibbott, G, Kadbi, M, and Blencowe, A. 2016. "SU-G-JeP2-04: Comparison Between Fricke-Type 3D Radiochromic Dosimeters for Real-Time Dose Distribution Measurements in MR-Guided Radiation Therapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957024.
@article{osti_22649370,
title = {SU-G-JeP2-04: Comparison Between Fricke-Type 3D Radiochromic Dosimeters for Real-Time Dose Distribution Measurements in MR-Guided Radiation Therapy},
author = {Lee, H and Alqathami, M and Wang, J and Ibbott, G and Kadbi, M and Blencowe, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To assess MR signal contrast for different ferrous ion compounds used in Fricke-type gel dosimeters for real-time dose measurements for MR-guided radiation therapy applications. Methods: Fricke-type gel dosimeters were prepared in 4% w/w gelatin prior to irradiation in an integrated 1.5 T MRI and 7 MV linear accelerator system (MR-Linac). 4 different ferrous ion (Fe2?) compounds (referred to as A, B, C, and D) were investigated for this study. Dosimeter D consisted of ferrous ammonium sulfate (FAS), which is conventionally used for Fricke dosimeters. Approximately half of each cylindrical dosimeter (45 mm diameter, 80 mm length) was irradiated to ∼17 Gy. MR imaging during irradiation was performed with the MR-Linac using a balanced-FFE sequence of TR/TE = 5/2.4 ms. An approximate uncertainty of 5% in our dose delivery was anticipated since the MR-Linac had not yet been fully commissioned. Results: The signal intensities (SI) increased between the un-irradiated and irradiated regions by approximately 8.6%, 4.4%, 3.2%, and 4.3% after delivery of ∼2.8 Gy for dosimeters A, B, C, and D, respectively. After delivery of ∼17 Gy, the SI had increased by 24.4%, 21.0%, 3.1%, and 22.2% compared to the un-irradiated regions. The increase in SI with respect to dose was linear for dosimeters A, B, and D with slopes of 0.0164, 0.0251, and 0.0236 Gy{sup −1} (R{sup 2} = 0.92, 0.97, and 0.96), respectively. Visually, dosimeter A had the greatest optical contrast from yellow to purple in the irradiated region. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the feasibility of using Fricke-type dosimeters for real-time dose measurements with the greatest optical and MR contrast for dosimeter A. We also demonstrated the need to investigate Fe{sup 2+} compounds beyond the conventionally utilized FAS compound in order to improve the MR signal contrast in 3D dosimeters used for MR-guided radiation therapy. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. LH- 102SPS.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957024},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Evaluate a large-field MRI phantom for assessment of geometric distortion in whole-body MRI for real-time MR guided radiation therapy. Methods: A prototype CIRS large-field MRI distortion phantom consisting of a PMMA cylinder (33 cm diameter, 30 cm length) containing a 3D-printed orthogonal grid (3 mm diameter rods, 20 mm apart), was filled with 6 mM NiCl{sub 2} and 30 mM NaCl solution. The phantom was scanned at 1.5T and 3.0T on a GE HDxt and Discovery MR750, respectively, and at 0.35T on a ViewRay system. Scans were obtained with and without 3D distortion correction to demonstrate the impact ofmore » such corrections. CT images were used as a reference standard for analysis of geometric distortion, as determined by a fully automated gradient-search method developed in Matlab. Results: 1,116 grid points distributed throughout a cylindrical volume 28 cm in diameter and 16 cm in length were identified and analyzed. With 3D distortion correction, average/maximum displacements for the 1.5, 3.0, and 0.35T systems were 0.84/2.91, 1.00/2.97, and 0.95/2.37 mm, respectively. The percentage of points with less than (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 mm) total displacement were (73%, 92%, 97%), (54%, 85%, 97%), and (55%, 90%, 99%), respectively. A reduced scan volume of 20 × 20 × 10 cm{sup 3} (representative of a head and neck scan volume) consisting of 420 points was also analyzed. In this volume, the percentage of points with less than (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 mm) total displacement were (90%, 99%, 100%), (63%, 95%, 100%), and (75%, 96%, 100%), respectively. Without 3D distortion correction, average/maximum displacements were 1.35/3.67, 1.67/4.46, and 1.51/3.89 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The prototype large-field MRI distortion phantom and developed software provide a thorough assessment of 3D spatial distortions in MRI. The distortions measured were acceptable for RT applications, both for the high field strengths and the system configuration developed by ViewRay.« less
  • A system, consisting of a novel optical fiber-based readout configuration and model-based method, has been developed to test suitability of a certain radiochromic medium for real-time measurements of ionizing radiation dose. Using this system with the radiochromic film allowed dose measurements to be performed during, and immediately after, exposure. The rates of change in OD before, during, and after exposure differ, and the change in OD during exposure was found to be proportional to applied dose in the tested range of 0-4 Gy. Estimating applied dose within an average error of less than 5% did not require a waiting timemore » of 24-48 h as generally recommended with this radiochromic film. The errors can be further reduced by performing a calibration for each individual dosimeter setup instead of relying on batch calibration. Measurements of change in OD were found to be independent of dose-rate in the 95-570 cGy/min range for applied dose of 1 Gy or less. Some error was introduced due to dose-rate variation for doses of 2 Gy and above. The major limiting factor in utilizing this radiation sensitive medium for real-time in vivo dosimetry is the strong dependence on temperature in the clinically relevant range of 20-38 deg. C.« less
  • A new radiochromic film, GafChromic EBT, was investigated for use in a real-time radiation dosimetry system. It was found to be approximately eight times more sensitive to ionizing radiation dose, exhibited less postexposure development and achieved stable readout faster than one of its predecessors, GafChromic MD-55. A clear distinction in change in optical density between exposure and postexposure was observed, but the measurements obtained during exposure were not linear with time or dose. This could not be explained by a shift in wavelength of maximum change in absorbance, as it was stable at {approx}636 nm during the entire exposure rangemore » (up to 9.52 Gy). Increasing the spectral window of interest over which calculations were performed did little to correct the nonlinearity. The radiochromic film exhibited small dose rate dependence in real-time measurements, with an increase in standard deviation of change in optical density measurements from 0.9% to 1.8% over a sixfold variation in dose rate. Overall, GafChromic EBT has increased sensitivity and decreased postexposure darkening, and this bodes well for its potential role as a radiation dosimeter, including real-time applications.« less
  • A fast, accurate and stable optimization algorithm is very important for inverse planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and for implementing dose-adaptive radiotherapy in the future. Conventional numerical search algorithms with positive beam weight constraints generally require numerous iterations and may produce suboptimal dose results due to trapping in local minima regions of the objective function landscape. A direct solution of the inverse problem using conventional quadratic objective functions without positive beam constraints is more efficient but it will result in unrealistic negative beam weights. We review here a direct solution of the inverse problem that is efficient and doesmore » not yield unphysical negative beam weights. In fast inverse dose optimization (FIDO) method the objective function for the optimization of a large number of beamlets is reformulated such that the optimization problem is reducible to a linear set of equations. The optimal set of intensities is then found through a matrix inversion, and negative beamlet intensities are avoided without the need for externally imposed ad hoc conditions. In its original version [S. P. Goldman, J. Z. Chen, and J. J. Battista, in Proceedings of the XIVth International Conference on the Use of Computers in Radiation Therapy, 2004, pp. 112-115; S. P. Goldman, J. Z. Chen, and J. J. Battista, Med. Phys. 32, 3007 (2005)], FIDO was tested on single two-dimensional computed tomography (CT) slices with sharp KERMA beams without scatter, in order to establish a proof of concept which demonstrated that FIDO could be a viable method for the optimization of cancer treatment plans. In this paper we introduce the latest advancements in FIDO that now include not only its application to three-dimensional volumes irradiated by beams with full scatter but include as well a complete implementation of clinical dose-volume constraints including maximum and minimum dose as well as equivalent uniform dose constraints. The method has been integrated into a commercial treatment planning system (Pinnacle, Philips Medical Systems) for beta testing using clinical radiotherapy cases and standard dose constraints set by radiation oncologists. Our FIDO method consistently delivered excellent treatment plans comparable and often better than those obtained using standard optimization techniques that are considerably slower. By design, FIDO is guaranteed to find a global minimum and will achieve highly conformal and homogeneous dose distributions without the need for artificial internal contours that must be created in conventional IMRT optimization systems to help the search engines better control some beam entry directions and in this way avoid the creation of hot and cold spots. This method provides a fast, intuitive and robust technique that yields excellent results for the inverse planning of IMRT. FIDO's ability to efficiently optimize very large numbers of beamlet weights also makes it an ideal tool for the optimization of helical tomotherapy. Future gains in speed will make it possible to use FIDO for instant treatment plan reoptimization using CT images produced at the radiotherapy machine, just prior to daily treatments of the patient.« less
  • Purpose: Synthetic-CTs(synCTs) are essential for MR-only treatment planning. However, the performance of synCT for IGRT must be carefully assessed. This work evaluated the accuracy of synCT and synCT-generated DRRs and determined their performance for IGRT in brain cancer radiation therapy. Methods: MR-SIM and CT-SIM images were acquired of a novel anthropomorphic phantom and a cohort of 12 patients. SynCTs were generated by combining an ultra-short echo time (UTE) sequence with other MRI datasets using voxel-based weighted summation. For the phantom, DRRs from synCT and CT were compared via bounding box and landmark analysis. Planar (MV/KV) and volumetric (CBCT) IGRT performancemore » were evaluated across several platforms. In patients, retrospective analysis was conducted to register CBCTs (n=34) to synCTs and CTs using automated rigid registration in the treatment planning system using whole brain and local registration techniques. A semi-automatic registration program was developed and validated to rigidly register planar MV/KV images (n=37) to synCT and CT DRRs. Registration reproducibility was assessed and margin differences were characterized using the van Herk formalism. Results: Bounding box and landmark analysis of phantom synCT DRRs were within 1mm of CT DRRs. Absolute 2D/2D registration shift differences ranged from 0.0–0.7mm for phantom DRRs on all treatment platforms and 0.0–0.4mm for volumetric registrations. For patient planar registrations, mean shift differences were 0.4±0.5mm (range: −0.6–1.6mm), 0.0±0.5mm, (range: −0.9–1.2mm), and 0.1±0.3mm (range: −0.7–0.6mm) for the superior-inferior(S-I), left-right(L–R), and anterior-posterior(A-P) axes, respectively. Mean shift differences in volumetric registrations were 0.6±0.4mm (range: −0.2–1.6mm), 0.2±0.4mm (range: −0.3–1.2mm), and 0.2±0.3mm (range: −0.2–1.2mm) for S-I, L–R, and A–P axes, respectively. CT-SIM and synCT derived margins were within 0.3mm. Conclusion: DRRs generated via synCT agreed well with CT-SIM. Planar and volumetric registrations to synCT-derived targets were comparable to CT. This validation is the next step toward clinical implementation of MR-only planning for the brain. The submitting institution has research agreements with Philips Healthcare. Research sponsored by a Henry Ford Health System Internal Mentored Grant.« less