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Title: SU-G-TeP1-11: Predictors of Cardiac and Lung Dose Sparing in DIBH for Left Breast Treatment

Abstract

Purpose: This retrospective study of left sided whole breast radiation therapy (RT) patients investigates possible predictive parameters correlating to cardiac and left lung dose sparing by deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique compared to free-breathing (FB). Methods: Thirty-one patients having both DIBH and FB CT scans were included in the study. All patients were planned with a standard step-and-shoot tangential technique using MV photons, with prescription of 50Gy or 50.4Gy. The displacement of the breath hold sternal mark during DIBH, the cardiac contact distances of the axial (CCDax) and parasagittal (CCDps) planes, and lateral-heart-to-chest (LHC) distance on FB CT scans were measured. Lung volumes, mean dose and dose-volume histograms (V5, V10 and V20) were analyzed and compared for heart and left lung for both FB and DIBH techniques. Correlation analysis was performed to identify the predictors for heart and left lung dose sparing. Two-tailed Student’s t-test and linear regression were used for data analysis with significance level of P≤0.05. Results: All dosimetric metrics for the heart and left lung were significantly reduced (P<0.01) with DIBH. Breath hold sternal mark displacement ranged from 0.4–1.8 cm and correlated with mean (P=0.05) and V5 (P=0.02) of heart dose reduction by DIBH. FB lung volumemore » showed correlation with mean lung dose reduction by DIBH (P<0.01). The FB-CCDps and FB-LHC distance had strong positive and negative correlation with FB mean heart dose (P<0.01) and mean heart dose reduction by DIBH (P<0.01), respectively. FB-CCDax showed no correlation with dosimetric changes. Conclusion: DIBH technique has been shown to reduce dose to the heart and left lung. In this patient cohort, FB-CCDps, FB-LHC distance, and FB lung volume served as significant predictors for heart and left lung. These parameters can be further investigated to be used as a tool to better select patients who will benefit from DIBH.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)
  2. Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649351
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; CHEST; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CORRELATIONS; DATA ANALYSIS; DISTANCE; HEART; LUNGS; MAMMARY GLANDS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES

Citation Formats

Cao, N, Kalet, A, Fang, L, Dempsey, C, Young, L, Kim, J, Mayr, N, Meyer, J, Lavilla, M, Richardson, H, and McClure, R. SU-G-TeP1-11: Predictors of Cardiac and Lung Dose Sparing in DIBH for Left Breast Treatment. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957001.
Cao, N, Kalet, A, Fang, L, Dempsey, C, Young, L, Kim, J, Mayr, N, Meyer, J, Lavilla, M, Richardson, H, & McClure, R. SU-G-TeP1-11: Predictors of Cardiac and Lung Dose Sparing in DIBH for Left Breast Treatment. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957001.
Cao, N, Kalet, A, Fang, L, Dempsey, C, Young, L, Kim, J, Mayr, N, Meyer, J, Lavilla, M, Richardson, H, and McClure, R. Wed . "SU-G-TeP1-11: Predictors of Cardiac and Lung Dose Sparing in DIBH for Left Breast Treatment". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957001.
@article{osti_22649351,
title = {SU-G-TeP1-11: Predictors of Cardiac and Lung Dose Sparing in DIBH for Left Breast Treatment},
author = {Cao, N and Kalet, A and Fang, L and Dempsey, C and Young, L and Kim, J and Mayr, N and Meyer, J and Lavilla, M and Richardson, H and McClure, R},
abstractNote = {Purpose: This retrospective study of left sided whole breast radiation therapy (RT) patients investigates possible predictive parameters correlating to cardiac and left lung dose sparing by deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique compared to free-breathing (FB). Methods: Thirty-one patients having both DIBH and FB CT scans were included in the study. All patients were planned with a standard step-and-shoot tangential technique using MV photons, with prescription of 50Gy or 50.4Gy. The displacement of the breath hold sternal mark during DIBH, the cardiac contact distances of the axial (CCDax) and parasagittal (CCDps) planes, and lateral-heart-to-chest (LHC) distance on FB CT scans were measured. Lung volumes, mean dose and dose-volume histograms (V5, V10 and V20) were analyzed and compared for heart and left lung for both FB and DIBH techniques. Correlation analysis was performed to identify the predictors for heart and left lung dose sparing. Two-tailed Student’s t-test and linear regression were used for data analysis with significance level of P≤0.05. Results: All dosimetric metrics for the heart and left lung were significantly reduced (P<0.01) with DIBH. Breath hold sternal mark displacement ranged from 0.4–1.8 cm and correlated with mean (P=0.05) and V5 (P=0.02) of heart dose reduction by DIBH. FB lung volume showed correlation with mean lung dose reduction by DIBH (P<0.01). The FB-CCDps and FB-LHC distance had strong positive and negative correlation with FB mean heart dose (P<0.01) and mean heart dose reduction by DIBH (P<0.01), respectively. FB-CCDax showed no correlation with dosimetric changes. Conclusion: DIBH technique has been shown to reduce dose to the heart and left lung. In this patient cohort, FB-CCDps, FB-LHC distance, and FB lung volume served as significant predictors for heart and left lung. These parameters can be further investigated to be used as a tool to better select patients who will benefit from DIBH.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957001},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: A 7.4% increase in major coronary events per 1 Gy increase in mean heart dose has been reported from the population-based analysis of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity following treatment of left sided breast cancer. Deep inhalation breath-hold (DIBH) is clinically utilized to reduce radiation dose to heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD). We investigated the correlation of dose sparing in heart and LAD with internal DIBH amplitude to develop a quantitative predictive model for expected dose to heart and LAD based on internal breath hold amplitude. Methods: A treatment planning study (Prescription Dose = 50 Gy) was performed onmore » 50 left breast cancer patients underwent DIBH whole breast radiotherapy. Two CT datasets, free breathing (FB) and DIBH, were utilized for treatment planning and for determination of the internal anatomy DIBH amplitude (difference between sternum position at FB and DIBH). The heart and LAD dose between FB and DIBH plans was compared and dose to the heart and LAD as a function of breath hold amplitude was determined. Results: Average DIBH amplitude using internal anatomy was 13.9±4.2 mm. The DIBH amplitude-mean dose reduction correlation is 20%/5mm (0.3 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 18%/5mm (1.1 Gy/5mm) for LAD. The correlation with max dose reduction is 12%/5mm (3.8 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 16%/5mm (3.2 Gy/5mm) for LAD. We found that average dose reductions to LAD from 6.0±6.5 Gy to 2.0±1.6 Gy with DIBH (4.0 Gy reduction: -67%, p < 0.001) and average dose reduction to the heart from 1.3±0.7 Gy to 0.7±0.2 Gy with DIBH (0.6 Gy reduction: -46%, p < 0.001). That suggests using DIBH may reduce the risk of the major coronary event for left sided breast cancer patients. Conclusion: The correlation between breath hold amplitude and dosimetric sparing suggests that dose sparing linearly increases with internal DIBH amplitude.« less
  • Purpose: To explore the feasibility of supraclavicular field treatment by investigating the variation of junction position between tangential and supraclavicular fields during left breast radiation using DIBH technique. Methods: Six patients with left breast cancer treated using DIBH technique were included in this study. AlignRT system was used to track patient’s breast surface. During daily treatment, when the patient’s DIBH reached preset AlignRT tolerance of ±3mm for all principle directions (vertical, longitudinal, and lateral), the remaining longitudinal offset was recorded. The average with standard-deviation and the range of daily longitudinal offset for the entire treatment course were calculated for allmore » six patients (93 fractions totally). The ranges of average ± 1σ and 2σ were calculated, and they represent longitudinal field edge error with the confidence level of 68% and 95%. Based on these longitudinal errors, dose at junction between breast tangential and supraclavicular fields with variable gap/overlap sizes was calculated as a percentage of prescription (on a representative patient treatment plan). Results: The average of longitudinal offset for all patients is 0.16±1.32mm, and the range of longitudinal offset is −2.6 to 2.6mm. The range of longitudinal field edge error at 68% confidence level is −1.48 to 1.16mm, and at 95% confidence level is −2.80 to 2.48mm. With a 5mm and 1mm gap, the junction dose could be as low as 37.5% and 84.9% of prescription dose; with a 5mm and 1mm overlap, the junction dose could be as high as 169.3% and 117.6%. Conclusion: We observed longitudinal field edge error at 95% confidence level is about ±2.5mm, and the junction dose could reach 70% hot/cold between different DIBH. However, over the entire course of treatment, the average junction variation for all patients is within 0.2mm. The results from our study shows it is potentially feasible to treat supraclavicular field with breast tangents.« less
  • Purpose: With the increasing use of DIBH techniques for left-sided breast cancer, 3D surface-image guided DIBH techniques have improved patient setup and facilitated DIBH radiation delivery. However, quantification of the daily separation between the heart and left breast still presents a challenge. One method of assuring separation is to ensure consistent left lung filling. With this in mind, the aim of this study is to retrospectively quantify left lung volume from weekly breath hold-CBCTs (bh-CBCT) of left-sided breast patients treated using a 3D surface imaging system. Methods: Ten patients (n=10) previously treated to the left breast using the C-Rad CatalystHDmore » system (C-RAD AG, Uppsala Sweden) were evaluated. Patients were positioned with CatalystHD and with bh-CBCT. bh-CBCTs were acquired at the validation date, first day of treatment and at subsequent weekly intervals. Total treatment courses spanned from 3 to 5 weeks. bh-CBCT images were exported to VelocityAI and the left lung volume was segmented. Volumes were recorded and analyzed. Results: A total of 41 bh-CBCTs were contoured in VelocityAI for the 10 patients. The mean left lung volume for all patients was 1657±295cc based on validation bh-CBCT. With the subsequent lung volumes normalized to the validation lung volume, the mean relative ratios for all patients were 1.02±0.11, 0.97±0.14, 0.98±0.11, 1.02±0.01, and 0.96±0.02 for week 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. Overall, the mean left lung volume change was ≤4.0% over a 5-week course; however left lung volume variations of up to 28% were noted in a select patient. Conclusion: With the use of the C-RAD CatalystHD system, the mean lung volume variability over a 5-week course of DIBH treatments was ≤4.0%. By minimizing left lung volume variability, heart to left breast separation maybe more consistently maintained. AN Gutierrez has a research grant from C-RAD AG.« less
  • Purpose: There are clinical decision challenges to select optimal treatment positions for left-sided breast cancer patients—supine free breathing (FB), supine Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) and prone free breathing (prone). Physicians often make the decision based on experiences and trials, which might not always result optimal OAR doses. We herein propose a mathematical model to predict the lowest OAR doses among these three positions, providing a quantitative tool for corresponding clinical decision. Methods: Patients were scanned in FB, DIBH, and prone positions under an IRB approved protocol. Tangential beam plans were generated for each position, and OAR doses were calculated.more » The position with least OAR doses is defined as the optimal position. The following features were extracted from each scan to build the model: heart, ipsilateral lung, breast volume, in-field heart, ipsilateral lung volume, distance between heart and target, laterality of heart, and dose to heart and ipsilateral lung. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was applied to remove the co-linearity of the input data and also to lower the data dimensionality. Feature selection, another method to reduce dimensionality, was applied as a comparison. Support Vector Machine (SVM) was then used for classification. Thirtyseven patient data were acquired; up to now, five patient plans were available. K-fold cross validation was used to validate the accuracy of the classifier model with small training size. Results: The classification results and K-fold cross validation demonstrated the model is capable of predicting the optimal position for patients. The accuracy of K-fold cross validations has reached 80%. Compared to PCA, feature selection allows causal features of dose to be determined. This provides more clinical insights. Conclusion: The proposed classification system appeared to be feasible. We are generating plans for the rest of the 37 patient images, and more statistically significant results are to be presented.« less
  • Despite technical advancements in breast radiation therapy, cardiac structures are still subject to significant levels of irradiation. As the use of adjuvant radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery continues to improve survival for early breast cancer patients, the associated radiation-induced cardiac toxicities become increasingly relevant. Our primary aim was to evaluate the cardiac-sparing benefits of the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. An electronic literature search of the PubMed database from 1966 to July 2014 was used to identify articles published in English relating to the dosimetric benefits of DIBH. Studies comparing the mean heart dose of DIBH and free breathing treatmentmore » plans for left breast cancer patients were eligible to be included in the review. Studies evaluating the reproducibility and stability of the DIBH technique were also reviewed. Ten studies provided data on the benefits of DIBH during left breast irradiation. From these studies, DIBH reduced the mean heart dose by up to 3.4 Gy when compared to a free breathing approach. Four studies reported that the DIBH technique was stable and reproducible on a daily basis. According to current estimates of the excess cardiac toxicity associated with radiation therapy, a 3.4 Gy reduction in mean heart dose is equivalent to a 13.6% reduction in the projected increase in risk of heart disease. DIBH is a reproducible and stable technique for left breast irradiation showing significant promise in reducing the late cardiac toxicities associated with radiation therapy.« less