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Title: SU-G-JeP1-15: Sliding Window Prior Data Assisted Compressed Sensing for MRI Lung Tumor Tracking

Abstract

Purpose: Prior Data Assisted Compressed Sensing (PDACS) is a partial k-space acquisition and reconstruction method for mobile tumour (i.e. lung) tracking using on-line MRI in radiotherapy. PDACS partially relies on prior data acquired at the beginning of dynamic scans, and is therefore susceptible to artifacts in longer duration scan due to slow drifts in MR signal. A novel sliding window strategy is presented to mitigate this effect. Methods: MRI acceleration is simulated by retrospective removal of data from the fully sampled sets. Six lung cancer patients were scanned (clinical 3T MRI) using a balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) sequence for 3 minutes at approximately 4 frames per second, for a total of 650 dynamics. PDACS acceleration is achieved by undersampling of k-space in a single pseudo-random pattern. Reconstruction iteratively minimizes the total variations while constraining the images to satisfy both the currently acquired data and the prior data in missing k-space. Our novel sliding window technique (SW-PDACS), uses a series of distinct pseudo-random under-sampling patterns of partial k-space – with the prior data drawn from a sliding window of the most recent data available. Under-sampled data, simulating 2 – 5x acceleration are reconstructed using PDACS and SW-PDACS. Three quantitativemore » metrics: artifact power, centroid error and Dice’s coefficient are computed for comparison. Results: Quantitively metric values from all 6 patients are averaged in 3 bins, each containing approximately one minute of dynamic data. For the first minute bin, PDACS and SW-PDACS give comparable results. Progressive decline in image quality metrics in bins 2 and 3 are observed for PDACS. No decline in image quality is observed for SW-PDACS. Conclusion: The novel approach presented (SW-PDACS) is a more robust for accelerating longer duration (>1 minute) dynamic MRI scans for tracking lung tumour motion using on-line MRI in radiotherapy. B.G. Fallone is a co-founder and CEO of MagnetTx Oncology Solutions (under discussions to license Alberta bi-planar linac MR for commercialization).« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)
  2. (Canada)
  3. Medical Physics Division, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649340
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; IMAGES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; LUNGS; MATHEMATICAL SOLUTIONS; METRICS; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING

Citation Formats

Yip, E, Wachowicz, K, Rathee, S, Medical Physics Division, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, Yun, J, Gabos, Z, Fallone, B, Medical Physics Division, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, and MagnetTx Oncology Solutions, Ltd, PO Box 52112, Edmonton AB. SU-G-JeP1-15: Sliding Window Prior Data Assisted Compressed Sensing for MRI Lung Tumor Tracking. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956990.
Yip, E, Wachowicz, K, Rathee, S, Medical Physics Division, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, Yun, J, Gabos, Z, Fallone, B, Medical Physics Division, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, & MagnetTx Oncology Solutions, Ltd, PO Box 52112, Edmonton AB. SU-G-JeP1-15: Sliding Window Prior Data Assisted Compressed Sensing for MRI Lung Tumor Tracking. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956990.
Yip, E, Wachowicz, K, Rathee, S, Medical Physics Division, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, Yun, J, Gabos, Z, Fallone, B, Medical Physics Division, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, and MagnetTx Oncology Solutions, Ltd, PO Box 52112, Edmonton AB. Wed . "SU-G-JeP1-15: Sliding Window Prior Data Assisted Compressed Sensing for MRI Lung Tumor Tracking". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956990.
@article{osti_22649340,
title = {SU-G-JeP1-15: Sliding Window Prior Data Assisted Compressed Sensing for MRI Lung Tumor Tracking},
author = {Yip, E and Wachowicz, K and Rathee, S and Medical Physics Division, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB and Yun, J and Gabos, Z and Fallone, B and Medical Physics Division, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB and MagnetTx Oncology Solutions, Ltd, PO Box 52112, Edmonton AB},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Prior Data Assisted Compressed Sensing (PDACS) is a partial k-space acquisition and reconstruction method for mobile tumour (i.e. lung) tracking using on-line MRI in radiotherapy. PDACS partially relies on prior data acquired at the beginning of dynamic scans, and is therefore susceptible to artifacts in longer duration scan due to slow drifts in MR signal. A novel sliding window strategy is presented to mitigate this effect. Methods: MRI acceleration is simulated by retrospective removal of data from the fully sampled sets. Six lung cancer patients were scanned (clinical 3T MRI) using a balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) sequence for 3 minutes at approximately 4 frames per second, for a total of 650 dynamics. PDACS acceleration is achieved by undersampling of k-space in a single pseudo-random pattern. Reconstruction iteratively minimizes the total variations while constraining the images to satisfy both the currently acquired data and the prior data in missing k-space. Our novel sliding window technique (SW-PDACS), uses a series of distinct pseudo-random under-sampling patterns of partial k-space – with the prior data drawn from a sliding window of the most recent data available. Under-sampled data, simulating 2 – 5x acceleration are reconstructed using PDACS and SW-PDACS. Three quantitative metrics: artifact power, centroid error and Dice’s coefficient are computed for comparison. Results: Quantitively metric values from all 6 patients are averaged in 3 bins, each containing approximately one minute of dynamic data. For the first minute bin, PDACS and SW-PDACS give comparable results. Progressive decline in image quality metrics in bins 2 and 3 are observed for PDACS. No decline in image quality is observed for SW-PDACS. Conclusion: The novel approach presented (SW-PDACS) is a more robust for accelerating longer duration (>1 minute) dynamic MRI scans for tracking lung tumour motion using on-line MRI in radiotherapy. B.G. Fallone is a co-founder and CEO of MagnetTx Oncology Solutions (under discussions to license Alberta bi-planar linac MR for commercialization).},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956990},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: Hybrid radiotherapy-MRI devices promise real time tracking of moving tumors to focus the radiation portals to the tumor during irradiation. This approach will benefit from the increased temporal resolution of MRI's data acquisition and reconstruction. In this work, the authors propose a novel spatial-temporal compressed sensing (CS) imaging strategy for the real time MRI–-prior data assisted compressed sensing (PDACS), which aims to improve the image quality of the conventional CS without significantly increasing reconstruction times. Methods: Conventional 2D CS requires a random sampling of partial k-space data, as well as an iterative reconstruction that simultaneously enforces the image's sparsitymore » in a transform domain as well as maintains the fidelity to the acquired k-space. PDACS method requires the additional acquisition of the prior data, and for reconstruction, it additionally enforces fidelity to the prior k-space domain similar to viewsharing. In this work, the authors evaluated the proposed PDACS method by comparing its results to those obtained from the 2D CS and viewsharing methods when performed individually. All three methods are used to reconstruct images from lung cancer patients whose tumors move and who are likely to benefit from lung tumor tracking. The patients are scanned, using a 3T MRI, under free breathing using the fully sampled k-space with 2D dynamic bSSFP sequence in a sagittal plane containing lung tumor. These images form a reference set for the evaluation of the partial k-space methods. To create partial k-space, the fully sampled k-space is retrospectively undersampled to obtain a range of acquisition acceleration factors, and reconstructed with 2D-CS, PDACS, and viewshare methods. For evaluation, metrics assessing global image artifacts as well as tumor contour shape fidelity are determined from the reconstructed images. These analyses are performed both for the original 3T images and those at a simulated 0.5T equivalent noise level. Results: In the 3.0T images, the PDACS strategy is shown to give superior results compared to viewshare and conventional 2D CS using all metrics. The 2D-CS tends to perform better than viewshare at the low acceleration factors, while the opposite is true at the high acceleration factors. At simulated 0.5T images, PDACS method performs only marginally better than the viewsharing method, both of which are superior compared to 2D CS. The PDACS image reconstruction time (0.3 s/image) is similar to that of the conventional 2D CS. Conclusions: The PDACS method can potentially improve the real time tracking of moving tumors by significantly increasing MRI's data acquisition speeds. In 3T images, the PDACS method does provide a benefit over the other two methods in terms of both the overall image quality and the ability to accurately and automatically contour the tumor shape. MRI's data acquisition may be accelerated using the simpler viewsharing strategy at the lower, 0.5T magnetic field, as the marginal benefit of the PDACS method may not justify its additional reconstruction times.« less
  • Purpose: It is well known that lung tumors move with respiration. However, most measurements of lung tumor motion have studied long treatment times with intermittent imaging; those populations may not necessarily represent conventional LINAC patients. We summarized the correlation between tumor motion and location in a multi-institutional trial with electromagnetic tracking, and identified the patient cohort that would most benefit from respiratory gating. Methods: Continuous electromagnetic transponder data (Varian Medical, Seattle, WA) of lung tumor motion was collected from 14 patients (214 total fractions) across 3 institutions during external beam radiation therapy in a prospective clinical trial (NCT01396551). External interventionmore » from the clinician, such as couch shifts, instructed breath-holds, and acquisition pauses, were manually removed from the 10 Hz tracking data according to recorded notes. The average three-dimensional displacement from the breathing cycle’s end-expiratory to end-inhalation phases (peak-to-peak distance) of the transponders’ isocenter was calculated for each patient’s treatment. A weighted average of each isocenter was used to assess the effects of location on motion. A total of 14 patients were included in this analysis, grouped by their transponders’ location in the lung: upper, medial, and lower. Results: 8 patients had transponders in the upper lung, and 3 patients each in the medial lobe and lower lung. The weighted average ± standard deviation of all peak-to-peak distances for each group was: 1.04 ± 0.39 cm in the lower lung, 0.56 ± 0.14 cm in the medial lung, and 0.30 ± 0.06 cm in the upper lung. Conclusion: Tumors in the lower lung are most susceptible to excessive motion and daily variation, and would benefit most from continuous motion tracking and gating. Those in the medial lobe might be at moderate risk. The upper lobes have limited motion. These results can guide different motion management strategies between lung tumor locations. This is part of an NIH-funded prospective clinical trial (NCT01396551), using an electromagnetic transponder tracking system and additional funding from Varian Medical (Seattle, WA).« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the effect of inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion on the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)–based lung tumor internal target volumes (ITV), using deformable image registration of real-time 2D-sagital cine-mode MRI acquired during lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Five lung tumor patients underwent free breathing SBRT treatment on the ViewRay, with dose prescribed to PTV (4DCT MIP-based ITV+3–6mm margin). Sagittal slice cine-MR images (3.5×3.5mm pixels) were acquired through the center of the tumor at 4 frames per second throughout the treatments (3–4 fractions of 21–32 minutes duration). Tumor GTVs were contoured on the firstmore » frame of the cine and tracked throughout the treatment using off-line optical-flow based deformable registration implemented on a GPU cluster. Pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITVs were generated from MIPs of the deformed GTV contours limited to short segments of image data. All possible pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITV volumes were generated with 1s resolution and compared to the ITV volume of the entire treatment course. Varying pseudo-4DCT durations from 10-50s were analyzed. Results: Tumors were covered in their entirety by PTV in the patients analysed here. However, pseudo-4DCT based ITV volumes were observed that were as small as 29% of the entire treatment-ITV, depending on breathing irregularity and the duration of pseudo-4DCT. With an increase in duration of pseudo-4DCT from 10–50s the minimum volume acquired from 95% of all pseudo-4DCTs increased from 62%–81% of the treatment ITV. Conclusion: A 4DCT MIP-based ITV offers a ‘snap-shot’ of breathing motion for the brief period of time the tumor is imaged on a specific day. Real time MRI over prolonged periods of time and over multiple treatment fractions shows that the accuracy of this snap-shot varies according to inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion. Further work is required to investigate the dosimetric effect of these results.« less
  • Purpose: The new real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy (RTRT) system was installed in our institution. This system consists of two x-ray tubes and color image intensifiers (I.I.s). The fiducial marker which was implanted near the tumor was tracked using color fluoroscopic images. However, the implantation of the fiducial marker is very invasive. Color fluoroscopic images enable to increase the recognition of the tumor. However, these images were not suitable to track the tumor without fiducial marker. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of markerless tracking using dual energy colored fluoroscopic images for real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. Methods: Themore » colored fluoroscopic images of static and moving phantom that had the simulated tumor (30 mm diameter sphere) were experimentally acquired using the RTRT system. The programmable respiratory motion phantom was driven using the sinusoidal pattern in cranio-caudal direction (Amplitude: 20 mm, Time: 4 s). The x-ray condition was set to 55 kV, 50 mA and 105 kV, 50 mA for low energy and high energy, respectively. Dual energy images were calculated based on the weighted logarithmic subtraction of high and low energy images of RGB images. The usefulness of dual energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template image matching algorithm was investigated. Results: Our proposed dual energy subtraction improve the contrast between tumor and background to suppress the bone structure. For static phantom, our results showed that high tracking accuracy using dual energy subtraction images. For moving phantom, our results showed that good tracking accuracy using dual energy subtraction images. However, tracking accuracy was dependent on tumor position, tumor size and x-ray conditions. Conclusion: We indicated that feasibility of markerless tracking using dual energy fluoroscopic images for real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. Furthermore, it is needed to investigate the tracking accuracy using proposed dual energy subtraction images for clinical cases.« less
  • Purpose: The respirato ry gating system combined the TrueBeam and a new real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system (RTRT) was installed. The RTRT system consists of two x-ray tubes and color image intensifiers. Using fluoroscopic images, the fiducial marker which was implanted near the tumor was tracked and was used as the internal surrogate for respiratory gating. The purposes of this study was to develop the verification technique of the respiratory gating with the new RTRT using cine electronic portal image device images (EPIDs) of TrueBeam and log files of the RTRT. Methods: A patient who underwent respiratory gated SBRT of themore » lung using the RTRT were enrolled in this study. For a patient, the log files of three-dimensional coordinate of fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were acquired using the RTRT. Simultaneously, the cine EPIDs were acquired during respiratory gated radiotherapy. The data acquisition was performed for one field at five sessions during the course of SBRT. The residual motion errors were calculated using the log files (E{sub log}). The fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate into the cine EPIDs was automatically extracted by in-house software based on the template-matching algorithm. The differences between the the marker positions of cine EPIDs and digitally reconstructed radiograph were calculated (E{sub EPID}). Results: Marker detection on EPID using in-house software was influenced by low image contrast. For one field during the course of SBRT, the respiratory gating using the RTRT showed the mean ± S.D. of 95{sup th} percentile E{sub EPID} were 1.3 ± 0.3 mm,1.1 ± 0.5 mm,and those of E{sub log} were 1.5 ± 0.2 mm, 1.1 ± 0.2 mm in LR and SI directions, respectively. Conclusion: We have developed the verification method of respiratory gating combined TrueBeam and new real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system using EPIDs and log files.« less