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Title: SU-G-IeP1-15: Towards Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow Quantification with Distortion- Corrected Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling

Abstract

Purpose: Traditional arterial spin labeling (ASL) acquisitions with echo planar imaging (EPI) readouts suffer from image distortion due to susceptibility effects, compromising ASL’s ability to accurately quantify cerebral blood flow (CBF) and assess disease-specific patterns associated with CBF abnormalities. Phase labeling for additional coordinate encoding (PLACE) can remove image distortion; our goal is to apply PLACE to improve the quantitative accuracy of ASL CBF in humans. Methods: Four subjects were imaged on a 3T Philips Ingenia scanner using a 16-channel receive coil with a 21/21/10cm (frequency/phase/slice direction) field-of-view. An ASL sequence with a pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) labeling scheme was employed to acquire thirty dynamics of single-shot EPI data, with control and label datasets for all dynamics, and PLACE gradients applied on odd dynamics. Parameters included a post-labeling delay = 2s, label duration = 1.8s, flip angle = 90°, TR/TE = 5000/23.5ms, and 2.9/2.9/5.0mm (frequency/phase/slice direction) voxel size. “M0” EPI-reference images and T1-weighted spin-echo images with 0.8/1.0/3.3mm (frequency/phase/slice directions) voxel size were also acquired. Complex conjugate image products of pCASL odd and even dynamics were formed, a linear phase ramp applied, and data expanded and smoothed. Data phase was extracted to map control, label, and M0 magnitude image pixels to theirmore » undistorted locations, and images were rebinned to original size. All images were corrected for motion artifacts in FSL 5.0. pCASL images were registered to M0 images, and control and label images were subtracted to compute quantitative CBF maps. Results: pCASL image and CBF map distortions were removed by PLACE in all subjects. Corrected images conformed well to the anatomical T1-weighted reference image, and deviations in corrected CBF maps were evident. Conclusion: Eliminating pCASL distortion with PLACE can improve CBF quantification accuracy using minimal pulse sequence modifications and no additional scan time, improving ASL’s clinical applicability.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649326
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BLOOD FLOW; IMAGES; LABELLING; READOUT SYSTEMS; SPIN ECHO

Citation Formats

Hoff, M, Rane-Levandovsky, S, and Andre, J. SU-G-IeP1-15: Towards Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow Quantification with Distortion- Corrected Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956975.
Hoff, M, Rane-Levandovsky, S, & Andre, J. SU-G-IeP1-15: Towards Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow Quantification with Distortion- Corrected Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956975.
Hoff, M, Rane-Levandovsky, S, and Andre, J. 2016. "SU-G-IeP1-15: Towards Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow Quantification with Distortion- Corrected Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956975.
@article{osti_22649326,
title = {SU-G-IeP1-15: Towards Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow Quantification with Distortion- Corrected Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling},
author = {Hoff, M and Rane-Levandovsky, S and Andre, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Traditional arterial spin labeling (ASL) acquisitions with echo planar imaging (EPI) readouts suffer from image distortion due to susceptibility effects, compromising ASL’s ability to accurately quantify cerebral blood flow (CBF) and assess disease-specific patterns associated with CBF abnormalities. Phase labeling for additional coordinate encoding (PLACE) can remove image distortion; our goal is to apply PLACE to improve the quantitative accuracy of ASL CBF in humans. Methods: Four subjects were imaged on a 3T Philips Ingenia scanner using a 16-channel receive coil with a 21/21/10cm (frequency/phase/slice direction) field-of-view. An ASL sequence with a pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) labeling scheme was employed to acquire thirty dynamics of single-shot EPI data, with control and label datasets for all dynamics, and PLACE gradients applied on odd dynamics. Parameters included a post-labeling delay = 2s, label duration = 1.8s, flip angle = 90°, TR/TE = 5000/23.5ms, and 2.9/2.9/5.0mm (frequency/phase/slice direction) voxel size. “M0” EPI-reference images and T1-weighted spin-echo images with 0.8/1.0/3.3mm (frequency/phase/slice directions) voxel size were also acquired. Complex conjugate image products of pCASL odd and even dynamics were formed, a linear phase ramp applied, and data expanded and smoothed. Data phase was extracted to map control, label, and M0 magnitude image pixels to their undistorted locations, and images were rebinned to original size. All images were corrected for motion artifacts in FSL 5.0. pCASL images were registered to M0 images, and control and label images were subtracted to compute quantitative CBF maps. Results: pCASL image and CBF map distortions were removed by PLACE in all subjects. Corrected images conformed well to the anatomical T1-weighted reference image, and deviations in corrected CBF maps were evident. Conclusion: Eliminating pCASL distortion with PLACE can improve CBF quantification accuracy using minimal pulse sequence modifications and no additional scan time, improving ASL’s clinical applicability.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956975},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Cerebral blood flow quantification in arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI requires an estimate of the equilibrium magnetization of blood, which is often obtained by a set of proton density (PD) reference image. Normally, a constant blood-brain partition coefficient is assumed across the brain. However, this assumption may not be valid for brain lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of lesion-related PD variations on ASL quantification in patients with brain tumors. Methods: MR images for posttreatment evaluation of 42 patients with brain tumors were retrospectively analyzed. These images were acquired on a 3T MRI scanner, including T2-weighted FLAIR,more » 3D pseudo-continuous ASL and post-contrast T1-weighted images. Anatomical images were coregistered with ASL images using the SPM software. Regions of interest (ROIs) of the enhancing and FLAIR lesions were manually drawn on the coregistered images. ROIs of the contralateral normal appearing tissues were also determined, with the consideration of approximating coil sensitivity patterns in lesion ROIs. Relative lesion blood flow (lesion/contralateral tissue) was calculated from both the CBF map (dependent on the PD) and the ΔM map for comparison. Results: The signal intensities in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions were significantly different than contralateral tissues on the PD reference image (p<0.001). The percent signal difference ranged from −15.9 to 19.2%, with a mean of 5.4% for the enhancing lesion, and from −2.8 to 22.9% with a mean of 10.1% for the FLAIR lesion. The high/low lesion-related PD signal resulted in inversely proportional under-/over-estimation of blood flow in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions. Conclusion: Significant signal differences were found between lesions and contralateral tissues in the PD reference image, which introduced errors in blood flow quantification in ASL. The error can be up to 20% in individual patients with an average of 5- 10% for the group of patients with brain tumors.« less
  • Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel method for size specific arterial cerebral blood volume (aCBV) mapping using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL), with multiple TI. Methods: Multiple PCASL images were obtained from a subject with TI of [300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, 3000, 3500, 4000] ms. Each TI pair was averaged six times. Two scans were performed: one without a flow crusher gradient and the other with a crusher gradient (10cm/s in three directions) to remove signals from large arteries. Scan times were 5min. without a crusher gradient and 5.5 min withmore » a crusher gradient. Non-linear fitting algorithm finds the minimum mean squared solution of per-voxel based aCBV, cerebral blood flow, and arterial transit time, and fits the data into a hemodynamic model that represents superposition of blood volume and flow components within a single voxel. Results: aCBV maps with a crusher gradient represent signals from medium and small sized arteries, while those without a crusher gradient represent signals from all sized arteries, indicating that flow crusher gradients can be effectively employed to achieve size-specific aCBV mapping. Regardless of flow crusher, the CBF and ATT maps are very similar in appearance. Conclusion: Quantitative size selective blood volume mapping controlled by a flow crusher is feasible without additional information because the ASL quantification process doesn’t require an arterial input function measured from a large artery. The size specific blood volume mapping is not interfered by sSignals from large arteries do not interfere with size specific aCBV mapping in the applications of interest in for applications in which only medium or small arteries are of interest.« less
  • Purpose: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MRI perfusion imaging method from which quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps can be calculated. Acquisition with variable post-labeling delays (PLD) and variable TRs allows for arterial transit time (ATT) mapping and leads to more accurate CBF quantification with a scan time saving of 48%. In addition, T1 and M0 maps can be obtained without a separate scan. In order to accurately estimate ATT and T1 of brain tissue from the ASL data, variable labeling durations were invented, entitled variable-bolus ASL. Methods: All images were collected on a healthy subject with a 3Tmore » Siemens Skyra scanner. Variable-bolus Psuedo-continuous ASL (PCASL) images were collected with 7 TI times ranging 100-4300ms in increments of 700ms with TR ranging 1000-5200ms. All boluses were 1600ms when the TI allowed, otherwise the bolus duration was 100ms shorter than the TI. All TI times were interleaved to reduce sensitivity to motion. Voxel-wise T1 and M0 maps were estimated using a linear least squares fitting routine from the average singal from each TI time. Then pairwise subtraction of each label/control pair and averaging for each TI time was performed. CBF and ATT maps were created using the standard model by Buxton et al. with a nonlinear fitting routine using the T1 tissue map. Results: CBF maps insensitive to ATT were produced along with ATT maps. Both maps show patterns and averages consistent with literature. The T1 map also shows typical T1 contrast. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated that variablebolus ASL produces CBF maps free from the errors due to ATT and tissue T1 variations and provides M0, T1, and ATT maps which have potential utility. This is accomplished with a single scan in a feasible scan time (under 6 minutes) with low sensivity to motion.« less
  • Purpose: pCASL was recommended as a potent approach for absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) quantification in clinical practice. However, uncertainties of tagging efficiency in pCASL remain an issue. This study aimed to estimate tagging efficiency by using short quantitative pulsed ASL scan (FAIR-QUIPSSII) and compare resultant CBF values with those calibrated by using 2D Phase Contrast (PC) MRI. Methods: Fourteen normal volunteers participated in this study. All images, including whole brain (WB) pCASL, WB FAIR-QUIPSSII and single-slice 2D PC, were collected on a 3T clinical MRI scanner with a 8-channel head coil. DeltaM map was calculated by averaging the subtractionmore » of tag/control pairs in pCASL and FAIR-QUIPSSII images and used for CBF calculation. Tagging efficiency was then calculated by the ratio of mean gray matter CBF obtained from pCASL and FAIR-QUIPSSII. For comparison, tagging efficiency was also estimated with 2D PC, a previously established method, by contrast WB CBF in pCASL and 2D PC. Feasibility of estimation from a short FAIR-QUIPSSII scan was evaluated by number of averages required for obtaining a stable deltaM value. Setting deltaM calculated by maximum number of averaging (50 pairs) as reference, stable results were defined within ±10% variation. Results: Tagging efficiencies obtained by 2D PC MRI (0.732±0.092) were significantly lower than which obtained by FAIRQUIPPSSII (0.846±0.097) (P<0.05). Feasibility results revealed that four pairs of images in FAIR-QUIPPSSII scan were sufficient to obtain a robust calibration of less than 10% differences from using 50 pairs. Conclusion: This study found that reliable estimation of tagging efficiency could be obtained by a few pairs of FAIR-QUIPSSII images, which suggested that calibration scan in a short duration (within 30s) was feasible. Considering recent reports concerning variability of PC MRI-based calibration, this study proposed an effective alternative for CBF quantification with pCASL.« less
  • Our height/area (recirculation-corrected) non-invasive cerebral blood flow method compares well with k1 values and k average as determined from k1, k2, p1 and p2 by Obrist computations. The height/area method provides regional flow measurements with less variability than k1 due to low regional head counts, head motion and end-tidal gas sample variations. Derivation of the mathematical model is for a single flow compartment and suited for tomographic measurements such as PET. Collimated detector data using our computation provides a good approximation of flow even for multiple compartments. Our approach permits a lower counting rate by either a smaller isotope dosemore » or better detector collimation than multicompartment curve fitting methods.« less