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Title: SU-G-206-15: Effects of Dose Reduction On Emphysema Score

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of reducing radiation dose levels on emphysema scores from lung cancer screening CT exams. Methods: 52 cases were selected from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) patients for which we had both the image series and the raw CT data. All scans were acquired with fixed effective mAs (25 for standard-sized patients, 40 for large patients) on a 64-slice scanner (Sensation 64, Siemens Healthcare) using 120kV, 64×0.6mm collimation and pitch 1.0. All images were reconstructed with 1mm slice thickness, B50 kernel. Based on a previously-published technique, we added noise to the raw data to simulate reduced-dose versions at 50% and 25% of the original dose (approximately 1.0- and 0.5-mGy CTDIvol). Lung segmentations were obtained via region growing from manual seed point at a threshold of 600HU followed by manual removal of trachea and major airways. Lung segmentations were only performed on original dose scans, and mapped to simulated reduced-dose scans. Emphysema scores based on relative area of lung with attenuation values lower than −950HU (RA950) were computed for all cases. Results: Average RA950 of all 50 cases were 31.6 (±5.5), 32.5 (±4.9) and 32.8 (±4.6) for 100%, 50% andmore » 25% dose level respectively. The average absolute difference in RA950 between simulated and original dose scans were 1.0 (±0.7) and 1.4 (±1.1) for 50% and 25% dose level respectively. Conclusion: RA950 is relatively robust to dose level, with a difference of no more than 5 from the original dose scans. The average RA950 of this population was high for a two reasons: This was a high risk population of patients with substantial smoking history; The use of B50 kernel, which may be biased towards high emphysema scores. Further exploration with smoother kernels will be conducted in the future. Institutional research agreement, Siemens Healthcare; Past recipient, research grant support, Siemens Healthcare; Consultant, Toshiba America Medical Systems; Consultant, Samsung Electronics; NIH grant support from U01 CA181156.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  2. UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  3. UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649314
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; EMPHYSEMA; KERNELS; LUNGS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Lo, P, Wahi-Anwar, M, Kim, H, Young, S, Hoffman, J, and McNitt-Gray, M. SU-G-206-15: Effects of Dose Reduction On Emphysema Score. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956956.
Lo, P, Wahi-Anwar, M, Kim, H, Young, S, Hoffman, J, & McNitt-Gray, M. SU-G-206-15: Effects of Dose Reduction On Emphysema Score. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956956.
Lo, P, Wahi-Anwar, M, Kim, H, Young, S, Hoffman, J, and McNitt-Gray, M. 2016. "SU-G-206-15: Effects of Dose Reduction On Emphysema Score". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956956.
@article{osti_22649314,
title = {SU-G-206-15: Effects of Dose Reduction On Emphysema Score},
author = {Lo, P and Wahi-Anwar, M and Kim, H and Young, S and Hoffman, J and McNitt-Gray, M},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of reducing radiation dose levels on emphysema scores from lung cancer screening CT exams. Methods: 52 cases were selected from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) patients for which we had both the image series and the raw CT data. All scans were acquired with fixed effective mAs (25 for standard-sized patients, 40 for large patients) on a 64-slice scanner (Sensation 64, Siemens Healthcare) using 120kV, 64×0.6mm collimation and pitch 1.0. All images were reconstructed with 1mm slice thickness, B50 kernel. Based on a previously-published technique, we added noise to the raw data to simulate reduced-dose versions at 50% and 25% of the original dose (approximately 1.0- and 0.5-mGy CTDIvol). Lung segmentations were obtained via region growing from manual seed point at a threshold of 600HU followed by manual removal of trachea and major airways. Lung segmentations were only performed on original dose scans, and mapped to simulated reduced-dose scans. Emphysema scores based on relative area of lung with attenuation values lower than −950HU (RA950) were computed for all cases. Results: Average RA950 of all 50 cases were 31.6 (±5.5), 32.5 (±4.9) and 32.8 (±4.6) for 100%, 50% and 25% dose level respectively. The average absolute difference in RA950 between simulated and original dose scans were 1.0 (±0.7) and 1.4 (±1.1) for 50% and 25% dose level respectively. Conclusion: RA950 is relatively robust to dose level, with a difference of no more than 5 from the original dose scans. The average RA950 of this population was high for a two reasons: This was a high risk population of patients with substantial smoking history; The use of B50 kernel, which may be biased towards high emphysema scores. Further exploration with smoother kernels will be conducted in the future. Institutional research agreement, Siemens Healthcare; Past recipient, research grant support, Siemens Healthcare; Consultant, Toshiba America Medical Systems; Consultant, Samsung Electronics; NIH grant support from U01 CA181156.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956956},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABRmore » and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across multiple clinical parameters. These data serve to inform our ongoing prospective trial of stereotactic ablative volume reduction (SAVR) for severe emphysema in poor candidates for LVRS.« less
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