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Title: SU-G-BRA-07: An Innovative Fiducial-Less Tracking Method for Radiation Treatment of Abdominal Tumors by Diaphragm Disparity Analysis

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of tracking abdominal tumors without the use of gold fiducial markers Methods: In this simulation study, an abdominal 4DCT dataset, acquired previously and containing 8 phases of the breathing cycle, was used as the testing data. Two sets of DRR images (45 and 135 degrees) were generated for each phase. Three anatomical points along the lung-diaphragm interface on each of the Digital Reconstructed Radiograph(DRR) images were identified by cross-correlation. The gallbladder, which simulates the tumor, was contoured for each phase of the breathing cycle and the corresponding centroid values serve as the measured center of the tumor. A linear model was created to correlate the diaphragm’s disparity of the three identified anatomical points with the center of the tumor. To verify the established linear model, we sequentially removed one phase of the data (i.e., 3 anatomical points and the corresponding tumor center) and created new linear models with the remaining 7 phases. Then we substituted the eliminated phase data (disparities of the 3 anatomical points) into the corresponding model to compare model-generated tumor center and the measured tumor center. Results: The maximum difference between the modeled and the measured centroid values across the 8 phasesmore » were 0.72, 0.29 and 0.30 pixels in the x, y and z directions respectively, which yielded a maximum mean-squared-error value of 0.75 pixels. The outcomes of the verification process, by eliminating each phase, produced mean-squared-errors ranging from 0.41 to 1.28 pixels. Conclusion: Gold fiducial markers, requiring surgical procedures to be implanted, are conventionally used in radiation therapy. The present work shows the feasibility of a fiducial-less tracking method for localizing abdominal tumors. Through developed diaphragm disparity analysis, the established linear model was verified with clinically accepted errors. The tracking method in real time under different radiation therapy platforms will be further investigated.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida (United States)
  2. Biophysics Research Institute of America, Miami, Florida (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649295
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BILIARY TRACT; DIAPHRAGM; FIDUCIAL MARKERS; IMAGES; LUNGS; NEOPLASMS; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Dick, D, Zhao, W, and Wu, X. SU-G-BRA-07: An Innovative Fiducial-Less Tracking Method for Radiation Treatment of Abdominal Tumors by Diaphragm Disparity Analysis. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956931.
Dick, D, Zhao, W, & Wu, X. SU-G-BRA-07: An Innovative Fiducial-Less Tracking Method for Radiation Treatment of Abdominal Tumors by Diaphragm Disparity Analysis. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956931.
Dick, D, Zhao, W, and Wu, X. 2016. "SU-G-BRA-07: An Innovative Fiducial-Less Tracking Method for Radiation Treatment of Abdominal Tumors by Diaphragm Disparity Analysis". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956931.
@article{osti_22649295,
title = {SU-G-BRA-07: An Innovative Fiducial-Less Tracking Method for Radiation Treatment of Abdominal Tumors by Diaphragm Disparity Analysis},
author = {Dick, D and Zhao, W and Wu, X},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of tracking abdominal tumors without the use of gold fiducial markers Methods: In this simulation study, an abdominal 4DCT dataset, acquired previously and containing 8 phases of the breathing cycle, was used as the testing data. Two sets of DRR images (45 and 135 degrees) were generated for each phase. Three anatomical points along the lung-diaphragm interface on each of the Digital Reconstructed Radiograph(DRR) images were identified by cross-correlation. The gallbladder, which simulates the tumor, was contoured for each phase of the breathing cycle and the corresponding centroid values serve as the measured center of the tumor. A linear model was created to correlate the diaphragm’s disparity of the three identified anatomical points with the center of the tumor. To verify the established linear model, we sequentially removed one phase of the data (i.e., 3 anatomical points and the corresponding tumor center) and created new linear models with the remaining 7 phases. Then we substituted the eliminated phase data (disparities of the 3 anatomical points) into the corresponding model to compare model-generated tumor center and the measured tumor center. Results: The maximum difference between the modeled and the measured centroid values across the 8 phases were 0.72, 0.29 and 0.30 pixels in the x, y and z directions respectively, which yielded a maximum mean-squared-error value of 0.75 pixels. The outcomes of the verification process, by eliminating each phase, produced mean-squared-errors ranging from 0.41 to 1.28 pixels. Conclusion: Gold fiducial markers, requiring surgical procedures to be implanted, are conventionally used in radiation therapy. The present work shows the feasibility of a fiducial-less tracking method for localizing abdominal tumors. Through developed diaphragm disparity analysis, the established linear model was verified with clinically accepted errors. The tracking method in real time under different radiation therapy platforms will be further investigated.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956931},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To investigate in a three-dimensional framework the effectiveness and reproducibility of reducing the respiratory motion of liver tumors using abdominal compression in a stereotactic body frame. Methods and Materials: A total of 12 patients with liver tumors, who were treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy, were included in this study. These patients had three gold fiducial markers implanted in the healthy liver tissue surrounding the tumor. Fluoroscopic videos were acquired on the planning day and before each treatment fraction to visualize the motion of the fiducial markers during free breathing and varying levels of abdominal compression. Software was developed tomore » track the fiducial markers and measure their excursions. Results: Abdominal compression reduced the patient group median excursion by 62% in the craniocaudal and 38% in the anteroposterior direction with respect to the median free-breathing excursions. In the left-right direction, the median excursion increased 15% (maximal increase 1.6 mm). The median residual excursion was 4.1 mm in the craniocaudal, 2.4 mm in the anteroposterior, and 1.8 mm in the left-right direction. The mean excursions were reduced by compression to <5 mm in all patients and all directions, with two exceptions (craniocaudal excursion reduction of 20.5 mm to 7.4 mm and of 21.1 mm to 5.9 mm). The residual excursions reproduced well during the treatment course, and the craniocaudal excursions measured on the treatment days were never significantly ({alpha} = 0.05) greater than on the planning days. Fine tuning the compression did not considerably change the excursion on the treatment days. Conclusions: Abdominal compression effectively reduced liver tumor motion, yielding small and reproducible excursions in three dimensions. The compression level established at planning could have been safely used on the treatment days.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate whether organ location, determined from preoperative diagnostic computed tomography scans (CTs), accurately reflects organ location when patients are positioned for radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We identified patients with upper abdominal malignancies treated with surgery and/or radiation therapy. Comparisons of organ position relative to fixed bony landmarks were made among preoperative diagnostic CTs, postoperative diagnostic CTs, and radiation-planning CTs. We studied 18 patients who had CTs differing only in scanning technique, 11 patients who had CTs differing only in operative state, and 7 patients with CTs differing in both scanning technique and operative state. Results: For patientsmore » with diagnostic CTs and radiation-planning CTs that were either both preoperative or both postoperative, mean organ position, measured relative to a fixed bony landmark, ranged from 1.9 to 3.2 cm superior on radiation-planning CTs compared with diagnostic CTs (p < 0.0001). Mean organ position ranged from 0.9 to 1.7 cm posterior on radiation-planning CTs compared with diagnostic CTs (p {<=} 0.008). Shifts in the right-left direction were small and variable. For patients with pre- and postoperative diagnostic CTs, organ shifts were variable and not significant. Organ shifts for patients with preoperative diagnostic CTs and postoperative radiation-planning CTs were similar to shifts observed for the first group. Conclusions: Relative to bony landmarks, there are superior and posterior shifts in organ position for radiation-planning CTs compared with diagnostic CTs. These shifts should be considered during treatment planning for resected abdominal tumors.« less
  • Purpose: Internal 1.5-mm fiducial markers were used in real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy (RT) for lung cancer. The fixation rate of the markers using the bronchial insertion technique, reliability of the setup using markers around the target volume, dislocation of the markers after real-time tumor-tracking RT, and long-term toxicity of marker insertion were investigated. Methods and Materials: Between July 2000 and April 2004, 154 gold markers were inserted into 57 patients with peripheral lung cancer. The distances between the implanted markers in 198 measurements in 71 setups in 11 patients were measured using two sets of orthogonal diagnostic X-ray images of themore » real-time tumor-tracking RT system. The distance between the markers and the chest wall was also measured in a transaxial CT image on 186 occasions in 48 patients during treatment planning and during follow-up. The median treatment time was 6 days (range, 4-14 days). Results: In 115 (75%) of the 154 inserted markers, the gold marker was detected throughout the treatment period. In 122 markers detected at CT planning, 115 (94%) were detected until the end of treatment. The variation in the distances between the implanted markers was within {+-}2 mm in 95% and {+-}1 mm in 80% during treatment. The variation in the distances between the implanted markers was >2 mm in at least one direction in 9% of the setups for which reexamination with a CT scan was indicated. The fixation rate in the left upper lobe was lower than in the other lobes. A statistically significant relationship was found between a shorter distance between the markers and the chest wall and the fixation rate, suggesting that the markers in the smaller bronchial lumens fixed better than those in the larger lumens. A learning curve among the endoscopists was suggested in the fixation rate. The distance between the markers and the chest wall changed significantly within a median of 44 days (range, 16-181 days) after treatment. Conclusion: The fixation of markers into the bronchial tree was useful for the setup for peripheral lung cancer and had an accuracy of {+-}2 mm during the 1-2-week treatment period. The relationship between the markers and tumor can change significantly after 2 weeks, suggesting that adaptive four-dimensional RT is required.« less
  • Purpose: A fiducial tracking system based on a novel radioactive tracking technology is being developed for real-time target tracking in radiation therapy. In this study, the authors calculate the radiation dose to the patient, the spouse/caretaker, and the medical staff that would result from a 100 {mu}Ci Ir192 radioactive fiducial marker permanently implanted in the prostate of a radiation therapy patient. Methods: Local tissue dose was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. The patient's whole body effective dose equivalent was calculated by summing the doses to the sensitive organs. Exposure of the spouse/caretaker was calculated from the NRC guidelines. Exposure ofmore » the medical staff was based on estimates of proximity to and time spent with the patient. Results: The local dose is below 40 Gy at 5 mm from the marker and below 10 Gy at 10 mm from the marker. The whole body effective dose equivalent to the patient is 64 mSv. The dose to the spouse/caretaker is 0.25 mSv. The annual exposures of the medical staff are 0.2 mSv for a doctor performing implantations and 0.34 mSv for a radiation therapist positioning patients for therapy. Conclusions: The local dose is not expected to have any clinically significant effect on the surrounding tissue which is irradiated during therapy. The dose to the patient is small in comparison to the whole body dose received from the therapy itself. The exposure of all other people is well below the recommended limits. The authors conclude that there is no radiation exposure related contraindication for use of this technology in the radiation treatment of prostate cancer.« less
  • Purpose: To determine which parameters allow for CyberKnife fiducial-less tumor tracking in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 133 lung SBRT patients were preselected for direct soft-tissue tracking based on manufacturer recommendations (peripherally located tumors ≥1.5 cm with a dense appearance) and staff experience. Patients underwent a tumor visualization test to verify adequate detection by the tracking system (orthogonal radiographs). An analysis of potential predictors of successful tumor tracking was conducted looking at: tumor stage, size, histology, tumor projection on the vertebral column or mediastinum, distance to the diaphragm,more » lung-to-soft tissue ratio, and patient body mass index. Results: Tumor visualization was satisfactory for 88 patients (66%) and unsatisfactory for 45 patients (34%). Median time to treatment start was 6 days in the success group (range, 2-18 days) and 15 days (range, 3-63 days) in the failure group. A stage T2 (P=.04), larger tumor size (volume of 15.3 cm{sup 3} vs 6.5 cm{sup 3} in success and failure group, respectively) (P<.0001), and higher tumor density (0.86 g/cm{sup 3} vs 0.79 g/cm{sup 3}) were predictive of adequate detection. There was a 63% decrease in failure risk with every 1-cm increase in maximum tumor dimension (relative risk for failure = 0.37, CI=0.23-0.60, P=.001). A diameter of 3.6 cm predicted a success probability of 80%. Histology, lung-to-soft tissue ratio, distance to diaphragm, patient's body mass index, and tumor projection on vertebral column and mediastinum were not found to be predictive of success. Conclusions: Tumor size, volume, and density were the most predictive factors of a successful XSight Lung tumor tracking. Tumors >3.5 cm have ≥80% chance of being adequately visualized and therefore should all be considered for direct tumor tracking.« less