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Title: SU-G-201-02: Application of RayStretch in Clinical Cases: A Calculation for Heterogeneity Corrections in LDR Permanent I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

Abstract

Purpose: Tissue heterogeneities and calcifications have significant impact on the dosimetry of low energy brachytherapy (BT). RayStretch is an analytical algorithm developed in our institution to incorporate heterogeneity corrections in LDR prostate brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to study its application in clinical cases by comparing its predictions with the results obtained with TG-43 and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: A clinical implant (71 I-125 seeds, 15 needles) from a real patient was considered. On this patient, different volumes with calcifications were considered. Its properties were evaluated in three ways by i) the Treatment planning system (TPS) (TG-43), ii) a MC study using the Penelope2009 code, and iii) RayStretch. To analyse the performance of RayStretch, calcifications located in the prostate lobules covering 11% of the total prostate volume and larger calcifications located in the lobules and underneath the urethra for a total occupied volume of 30% were considered. Three mass densities (1.05, 1.20, and 1.35 g/cm3) were explored for the calcifications. Therefore, 6 different scenarios ranging from small low density calcifications to large high density ones have been discussed. Results: DVH and D90 results given by RayStretch agree within 1% with the full MC simulations. Although no effortmore » has been done to improve RayStretch numerical performance, its present implementation is able to evaluate a clinical implant in a few seconds to the same level of accuracy as a detailed MC calculation. Conclusion: RayStretch is a robust method for heterogeneity corrections in prostate BT supported on TG-43 data. Its compatibility with commercial TPSs and its high calculation speed makes it feasible for use in clinical settings for improving treatment quality. It will allow in a second phase of this project, its use during intraoperative ultrasound planning. This study was partly supported by a fellowship grant from the Spanish Ministry of Education, by the Generalitat Valenciana under Project PROMETEOII/2013/010, by the Spanish Government under Project No. FIS2013-42156 and by the European Commission within the SeventhFramework Program through ENTERVISION (grant agreement number 264552).« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiooncology, Dresden (Germany)
  2. University of Valencia, Burjassot and IFIC (CSIC-UV) (Spain)
  3. University of Valencia, Burjassot (Spain)
  4. Hospital Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, and Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain)
  5. Clinic of Radiotherapy (Radiooncology), Kiel (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649244
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BRACHYTHERAPY; CORRECTIONS; IODINE 125; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PROSTATE; URINARY TRACT

Citation Formats

Hueso-Gonzalez, F, Vijande, J, Ballester, F, Perez-Calatayud, J, and Siebert, F. SU-G-201-02: Application of RayStretch in Clinical Cases: A Calculation for Heterogeneity Corrections in LDR Permanent I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956875.
Hueso-Gonzalez, F, Vijande, J, Ballester, F, Perez-Calatayud, J, & Siebert, F. SU-G-201-02: Application of RayStretch in Clinical Cases: A Calculation for Heterogeneity Corrections in LDR Permanent I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956875.
Hueso-Gonzalez, F, Vijande, J, Ballester, F, Perez-Calatayud, J, and Siebert, F. 2016. "SU-G-201-02: Application of RayStretch in Clinical Cases: A Calculation for Heterogeneity Corrections in LDR Permanent I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956875.
@article{osti_22649244,
title = {SU-G-201-02: Application of RayStretch in Clinical Cases: A Calculation for Heterogeneity Corrections in LDR Permanent I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy},
author = {Hueso-Gonzalez, F and Vijande, J and Ballester, F and Perez-Calatayud, J and Siebert, F},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Tissue heterogeneities and calcifications have significant impact on the dosimetry of low energy brachytherapy (BT). RayStretch is an analytical algorithm developed in our institution to incorporate heterogeneity corrections in LDR prostate brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to study its application in clinical cases by comparing its predictions with the results obtained with TG-43 and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: A clinical implant (71 I-125 seeds, 15 needles) from a real patient was considered. On this patient, different volumes with calcifications were considered. Its properties were evaluated in three ways by i) the Treatment planning system (TPS) (TG-43), ii) a MC study using the Penelope2009 code, and iii) RayStretch. To analyse the performance of RayStretch, calcifications located in the prostate lobules covering 11% of the total prostate volume and larger calcifications located in the lobules and underneath the urethra for a total occupied volume of 30% were considered. Three mass densities (1.05, 1.20, and 1.35 g/cm3) were explored for the calcifications. Therefore, 6 different scenarios ranging from small low density calcifications to large high density ones have been discussed. Results: DVH and D90 results given by RayStretch agree within 1% with the full MC simulations. Although no effort has been done to improve RayStretch numerical performance, its present implementation is able to evaluate a clinical implant in a few seconds to the same level of accuracy as a detailed MC calculation. Conclusion: RayStretch is a robust method for heterogeneity corrections in prostate BT supported on TG-43 data. Its compatibility with commercial TPSs and its high calculation speed makes it feasible for use in clinical settings for improving treatment quality. It will allow in a second phase of this project, its use during intraoperative ultrasound planning. This study was partly supported by a fellowship grant from the Spanish Ministry of Education, by the Generalitat Valenciana under Project PROMETEOII/2013/010, by the Spanish Government under Project No. FIS2013-42156 and by the European Commission within the SeventhFramework Program through ENTERVISION (grant agreement number 264552).},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956875},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: The inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF) method provides heterogeneity correction for the fast calculation TG43 formalism in seed brachytherapy. This study compared ICF-corrected plans to their standard TG43 counterparts, looking at their capacity to assess inadequate coverage and/or risk of any skin toxicities for patients who received permanent breast seed implant (PBSI). Methods and Materials: Two-month postimplant computed tomography scans and plans of 140 PBSI patients were used to calculate dose distributions by using the TG43 and the ICF methods. Multiple dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of clinical target volume (CTV) and skin were extracted and compared for both ICF and TG43more » dose distributions. Short-term (desquamation and erythema) and long-term (telangiectasia) skin toxicity data were available on 125 and 110 of the patients, respectively, at the time of the study. The predictive value of each DVH parameter of skin was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for each toxicity endpoint. Results: Dose-volume histogram parameters of CTV, calculated using the ICF method, showed an overall decrease compared to TG43, whereas those of skin showed an increase, confirming previously reported findings of the impact of heterogeneity with low-energy sources. The ICF methodology enabled us to distinguish patients for whom the CTV V{sub 100} and V{sub 90} are up to 19% lower compared to TG43, which could present a risk of recurrence not detected when heterogeneity are not accounted for. The ICF method also led to an increase in the prediction of desquamation, erythema, and telangiectasia for 91% of skin DVH parameters studied. Conclusions: The ICF methodology has the advantage of distinguishing any inadequate dose coverage of CTV due to breast heterogeneity, which can be missed by TG43. Use of ICF correction also led to an increase in prediction accuracy of skin toxicities in most cases.« less
  • Purpose: Boyer and Mok proposed a fast calculation method employing the Fourier transform (FT), for which calculation time is independent of the number of seeds but seed placement is restricted to calculation grid points. Here an interpolation method is described enabling unrestricted seed placement while preserving the computational efficiency of the original method. Methods: The Iodine-125 seed dose kernel was sampled and selected values were modified to optimize interpolation accuracy for clinically relevant doses. For each seed, the kernel was shifted to the nearest grid point via convolution with a unit impulse, implemented in the Fourier domain. The remaining fractionalmore » shift was performed using a piecewise third-order Lagrange filter. Results: Implementation of the interpolation method greatly improved FT-based dose calculation accuracy. The dose distribution was accurate to within 2% beyond 3 mm from each seed. Isodose contours were indistinguishable from explicit TG-43 calculation. Dose-volume metric errors were negligible. Computation time for the FT interpolation method was essentially the same as Boyer's method. Conclusions: A FT interpolation method for permanent prostate brachytherapy TG-43 dose calculation was developed which expands upon Boyer's original method and enables unrestricted seed placement. The proposed method substantially improves the clinically relevant dose accuracy with negligible additional computation cost, preserving the efficiency of the original method.« less
  • Purpose: To experimentally validate a new algorithm for reconstructing the 3D positions of implanted brachytherapy seeds from postoperatively acquired 2D conebeam-CT (CBCT) projection images. Methods: The iterative forward projection matching (IFPM) algorithm finds the 3D seed geometry that minimizes the sum of the squared intensity differences between computed projections of an initial estimate of the seed configuration and radiographic projections of the implant. In-house machined phantoms, containing arrays of 12 and 72 seeds, respectively, are used to validate this method. Also, four {sup 103}Pd postimplant patients are scanned using an ACUITY digital simulator. Three to ten x-ray images are selectedmore » from the CBCT projection set and processed to create binary seed-only images. To quantify IFPM accuracy, the reconstructed seed positions are forward projected and overlaid on the measured seed images to find the nearest-neighbor distance between measured and computed seed positions for each image pair. Also, the estimated 3D seed coordinates are compared to known seed positions in the phantom and clinically obtained VariSeed planning coordinates for the patient data. Results: For the phantom study, seed localization error is (0.58{+-}0.33) mm. For all four patient cases, the mean registration error is better than 1 mm while compared against the measured seed projections. IFPM converges in 20-28 iterations, with a computation time of about 1.9-2.8 min/iteration on a 1 GHz processor. Conclusions: The IFPM algorithm avoids the need to match corresponding seeds in each projection as required by standard back-projection methods. The authors' results demonstrate {approx}1 mm accuracy in reconstructing the 3D positions of brachytherapy seeds from the measured 2D projections. This algorithm also successfully localizes overlapping clustered and highly migrated seeds in the implant.« less
  • Purpose: To analyze the extent and time course of prostate edema and its effect on dosimetry after permanent seed prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients scheduled for permanent seed {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy agreed to a prospective study on postimplant edema. Implants were preplanned using transrectal ultrasonography. Postimplant dosimetry was calculated using computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (CT-MRI) fusion on the day of the implant (Day 1) and Days 8 and 30. The prostate was contoured on MRI, and the seeds were located on CT. Factors investigated for an influence on edema were the number of seeds and needles, preimplantmore » prostate volume, transitional zone index (transition zone volume divided by prostate volume), age, and prostate-specific antigen level. Prostate dosimetry was evaluated by the percentage of the prostate volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 100}) and percentage of prescribed dose received by 90% of the prostate volume (D{sub 90}). Results: Prostate edema was maximal on Day 1, with the median prostate volume 31% greater than preimplant transrectal ultrasound volume (range, 0.93-1.72; p < 0.001) and decreased with time. It was 21% greater than baseline at Day 8 (p = 0.013) and 5% greater on Day 30 (p < 0.001). Three patients still had a prostate volume greater than baseline by Day 30. The extent of edema depended on the transition zone volume (p = 0.016) and the preplan prostate volume (p 0.003). The median V{sub 100} on Day 1 was 93.6% (range, 86.0-98.2%) and was 96.3% (range, 85.7-99.5%) on Day 30 (p = 0.079). Patients with a Day 1 V{sub 100} >93% were less affected by edema resolution, showing a median increase in V{sub 100} of 0.67% on Day 30 compared with 2.77% for patients with a V{sub 100} <93 % on Day 1. Conclusion: Despite the extreme range of postimplant edema, the effect on dosimetry was less than expected. Dose coverage of the prostate was good for all patients during Days 1-30. Our data indicate that postimplant dosimetry on the day of implant is sufficient for patients with good dose coverage (Day 1 V{sub 100} >93%)« less
  • Purpose: To compare the urethral and prostate absolute and biologic effective doses (BEDs) for {sup 131}Cs and {sup 125}I prostate permanent implant brachytherapy (PPI). Methods and Materials: Eight previously implanted manually planned {sup 125}I PPI patients were replanned manually with {sup 131}Cs, and re-planned using Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing. {sup 131}Cs activity and the prescribed dose (115 Gy) were determined from that recommended by IsoRay. The BED was calculated for the prostate and urethra using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 2 and was also calculated for the prostate using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 6 and a urethral {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 2.more » The primary endpoints of this study were the prostate D{sub 90} BED (pD{sub 90}BED) and urethral D{sub 30} BED normalized to the maximal potential prostate D{sub 90} BED (nuD{sub 30}BED). Results: The manual plan comparison ({alpha}/{beta} = 2) yielded no significant difference in the prostate D{sub 90} BED (median, 192 Gy{sub 2} for both isotopes). No significant difference was observed for the nuD{sub 30}BED (median, 199 Gy{sub 2} and 202 Gy{sub 2} for {sup 125}I and {sup 131}Cs, respectively). For the inverse planning simulated annealing plan comparisons ({alpha}/{beta} 2), the prostate D{sub 90} BED was significantly lower with {sup 131}Cs than with {sup 125}I (median, 177 Gy{sub 2} vs. 187 Gy{sub 2}, respectively; p = 0.01). However, the nuD{sub 30}BED was significantly greater with {sup 131}Cs than with {sup 125}I (median, 192 Gy{sub 2} vs. 189 Gy{sub 2}, respectively; p = 0.01). Both the manual and the inverse planning simulated annealing plans resulted in a significantly lower prostate D{sub 90} BED (p = 0.01) and significantly greater nuD{sub 30}BED for {sup 131}Cs (p = 0.01), compared with {sup 125}I, when the prostate {alpha}/{beta} ratio was 6 and the urethral {alpha}/{beta} ratio was 2. Conclusion: This report highlights the controversy in comparing the dose to both the prostate and the organs at risk with different radionuclides.« less