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Title: SU-F-T-671: Effects of Collimator Material On Proton Minibeams

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of collimator material on spatially modulated proton minibeams (pMBRT). Methods: pMBRT holds promise to exhibit shallow depth normal-tissue sparing effects similar to synchrotron based microbeams while also retaining potential for uniform dose distributions for tumor targets. TOPAS Monte Carlo simulations were performed for a 5cm thick multislit collimator with 0.3mm slits and 1mm center-to-center spacing for a 50.5MeV proton minibeam while varying collimator material between brass, tungsten, and iron. The collimator was placed both “flush” at the water phantom surface and at 5cm distance to investigate the effects on surface dose, peak-to-valley-dose-ratio (PVDR) and neutron contribution. Results: For flush placement, the neutron dose at the phantom surface for the tungsten collimator was approximately 20% higher than for brass and iron. This was not reflected in the overall surface dose, which was comparable for all materials due to the relatively low neutron contribution of <0.1%. When the collimator was retracted, the overall neutron contribution was essentially identical for all three collimators. Surface dose dropped by ∼40% for all collimator materials with air gap compared to being flush with the phantom surface. This surface dose reduction was at the cost of increase in valley dose formore » all collimator materials due to increased angular divergence of the mini-beams at the surface and their consequent geometric penumbra at depth. When the collimator was placed at distance from the phantom surface the PVDR decreased. The peak-to-entrance-dose ratio was highest for the iron collimator with 5cm air gap. Conclusion: The dosimetric difference between the collimator materials is minimal despite the relatively higher neutron contribution at the phantom surface for the tungsten collimator when placed flush. The air gap between the collimator and phantom surface strongly influences all dosimetry parameters due to the influence of scatter on the narrow spatial modulation.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)
  2. University of Canterbury, Christchurch, Canterbury (New Zealand)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649226
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; COLLIMATORS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DOSIMETRY; IRON; MATERIALS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NEUTRONS; PHANTOMS; PROTONS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; TUNGSTEN

Citation Formats

Lee, E, Sandison, G, Cao, N, Stewart, R, Meyer, J, Eagle, J, and Marsh, S. SU-F-T-671: Effects of Collimator Material On Proton Minibeams. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956857.
Lee, E, Sandison, G, Cao, N, Stewart, R, Meyer, J, Eagle, J, & Marsh, S. SU-F-T-671: Effects of Collimator Material On Proton Minibeams. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956857.
Lee, E, Sandison, G, Cao, N, Stewart, R, Meyer, J, Eagle, J, and Marsh, S. Wed . "SU-F-T-671: Effects of Collimator Material On Proton Minibeams". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956857.
@article{osti_22649226,
title = {SU-F-T-671: Effects of Collimator Material On Proton Minibeams},
author = {Lee, E and Sandison, G and Cao, N and Stewart, R and Meyer, J and Eagle, J and Marsh, S},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of collimator material on spatially modulated proton minibeams (pMBRT). Methods: pMBRT holds promise to exhibit shallow depth normal-tissue sparing effects similar to synchrotron based microbeams while also retaining potential for uniform dose distributions for tumor targets. TOPAS Monte Carlo simulations were performed for a 5cm thick multislit collimator with 0.3mm slits and 1mm center-to-center spacing for a 50.5MeV proton minibeam while varying collimator material between brass, tungsten, and iron. The collimator was placed both “flush” at the water phantom surface and at 5cm distance to investigate the effects on surface dose, peak-to-valley-dose-ratio (PVDR) and neutron contribution. Results: For flush placement, the neutron dose at the phantom surface for the tungsten collimator was approximately 20% higher than for brass and iron. This was not reflected in the overall surface dose, which was comparable for all materials due to the relatively low neutron contribution of <0.1%. When the collimator was retracted, the overall neutron contribution was essentially identical for all three collimators. Surface dose dropped by ∼40% for all collimator materials with air gap compared to being flush with the phantom surface. This surface dose reduction was at the cost of increase in valley dose for all collimator materials due to increased angular divergence of the mini-beams at the surface and their consequent geometric penumbra at depth. When the collimator was placed at distance from the phantom surface the PVDR decreased. The peak-to-entrance-dose ratio was highest for the iron collimator with 5cm air gap. Conclusion: The dosimetric difference between the collimator materials is minimal despite the relatively higher neutron contribution at the phantom surface for the tungsten collimator when placed flush. The air gap between the collimator and phantom surface strongly influences all dosimetry parameters due to the influence of scatter on the narrow spatial modulation.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956857},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To develop a mathematical model of the fluence distribution of a proton pencil beam that is partially blocked by a collimator. Methods: In one dimension, an exact analytical solution of the proton distribution behind a collimator edge was derived, taking the beam’s phase space, the edge position, and the scattering downstream of the collimator as input. Extension to two dimensions was achieved using a Clarkson-like Method: determine the radial distances from each calculation point to the collimator outline, calculate the beam’s phase space in the direction of each radial line, apply the one-dimensional model along each radial line, andmore » sum the contributions. A Matlab implementation of the full model produced high-resolution distributions with relatively short calculation times (of about 2 ms per calculation point). The model was validated by comparison to Monte Carlo simulations for select pencil beam phase space distributions and collimator shapes. Results: Agreement between model and simulation confirm the exact mathematical solution of the one-dimensional model. In two dimensions the agreement is reasonable, but not exact, due to the approximations introduced in the Clarkson-like method. Conclusion: A model has been developed and validated that gives the lateral fluence distribution of a pencil beam beyond a collimator. Notably, this model does not include free parameters and the final fluence is completely determined by the phase space parameters of the beam, already existing in the treatment planning system, as well as both axial and lateral position of the aperture edge. As such, it can be incorporated in a full pencil-beam dose calculation algorithm allowing for the modeling of field-specific collimators in proton pencil beam scanning and, potentially, the optimization of collimator shape and/or pencil phase space in addition to the customary spot weight optimization.« less
  • Purpose: When particles traversing inhomogeneous materials like lung they show a characteristic range modulation which cannot be observed in homogeneous materials. It is possible to describe the range modulation by a convolution of an unperturbed Bragg-Curve and a normal distribution. The sigma of the normal distribution is a parameter for the strength of the modulation effect. A new material parameter (modulation power, P-mod) is introduced which is independent of the material thickness. It is defined as the square of sigma divided by the mean water equivalent thickness of the target (µ). Methods: The modulation power of lung tissue was determinedmore » by actual Bragg-peak measurements after traversing an ex-vivo porcine lung and by Monte-Carlo simulations with micro-CT data of human lung tissue. The determined modulation powers were used to show the effect of range modulation effects in a simplified treatment situation. A four centimeter spread-out Bragg-peak after traversing eight centimeter of lung tissue was simulated in FLUKA. The SOBP with and without consideration of range modulation effects were compared. Results: As well in the measurements as in the MC simulations range modulation effects of lung tissue were observed. The determined modulation powers showed a great range from 0.05 mm, in the micro-CT data, to 0.7 mm in the lung measurements. The SOBP comparison showed that range modulation effects Result in over- and underdosages at the distal and proximal edge of the SOBP. In the investigated case, the last 0.5 cm of the SOBP showed an underdosage of up to 50% at the distal edge, while 0.5 cm distal to the SOBP an overdosage of up to 50% was observed. Conclusion: Range modulation effects occur in inhomogeneous materials like lung. These modulation effects may Result in clinically relevant over- and underdosages but are currently not considered in commercially available treatment planning systems.« less
  • Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of internal motion within the brain on spatially modulated proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMRT) for small animal research. Methods: The peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR) is an essential dosimetric factor for pMRT. Motion of an animal brain caused by cardiac-induced pulsations (CIP) can impact dose deposition. For synchrotron generated high dose rate X-ray microbeams this effect is evaded due to the quasi-instantaneous delivery. By comparison, pMRT potentially suffers increased spread due to lower dose rates. However, for a given dose rate it is less susceptible to beam spread than microbeams, due to the spatial modulationmore » being an order of magnitude larger. Monte Carlo simulations in TOPAS were used to model the beam spread for a 50.5MeV pMRT beam. Motion effects were simulated for a 50mm thick brass collimator with 0.3mm slit width and 1.0mm center-to-center spacing in a water phantom. The maximum motion in a rat brain due to CIP has been reported to be 0.06mm. Motion was simulated with a peak amplitude in the range 0–0.2mm. Results: The impact of 0.06mm peak motion was minimal and reduced the PVDR by about 1% at a depth of 10mm. For 0.2mm peak motion the PVDR was reduced by 16% at a depth of 10mm. Conclusion: For the pMRT beam the magnitude of cardiac-induced brain motion has minimal impact on the PVDR for the investigated collimator geometry. For more narrow beams the effect is likely to be larger. This indicates that delivery of pMRT to small animal brains should not be affected considerably by beamlines with linac compatible dose rates.« less
  • Purpose: To reduce the lateral penumbra of low-energy proton beams, brass collimators are often used in spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). This study investigates the increase in biological effectiveness through collimator scattered protons in SSPT. Methods: The SSPT system of the Hokkaido University Hospital Proton Beam Therapy Center, which consists of a scanning nozzle, a 2-cm thick brass collimator, and a 4-cm thick energy absorber, was simulated with our validated Geant4 Monte Carlo code (ver. 9.3). A water phantom was irradiated with proton pencil beams of 76, 110, and 143 MeV. The tested collimator opening areas (COA) were 5×5, 10×10, andmore » 15×15 cm{sup 2}. Comparisons were made among the dose-averaged LET values of protons that hit the collimators (LETDColl), protons that did not hit the collimators (LETDNoColl), and all protons (LETDTotal). X-ray equivalent doses (Deq) were calculated using the linear-quadratic model with LETDNoColl and LETDTotal, and their maximum difference was determined over regions where the physical dose was greater than 10% of the peak dose of 2 Gy. Results: The ratio of the dose contribution of collimator scattered protons to that of all protons, defined as λ, was large at high proton energies and large COAs. The maximum λ value ranged from 3% (76 MeV, 5×5 cm{sup 2}) to 29% (143 MeV, 15×15 cm{sup 2}). Moreover, a large difference between LETDColl and LETDNoColl was only found in regions where λ was below 20% (ΔLETD > 2 keV/µm) and 8% (ΔLETD > 5 keV/µm). Consequently, the maximum difference between LETDNoColl and LETDTotal was as small as 0.8 keV/µm in all simulated voxels, and the difference of Deq reached a maximum of 1.5% that of the peak dose obtained at the water surface with a 76 MeV beam. Conclusion: Although collimator scattered protons have high LET, they only increase the physical dose, not the biological effectiveness.« less
  • Purpose: This work reports the results of the physics evaluation of a newly released InCise™2 Multileaf Collimator (MLC) installed in our institution. Methods: Beam property data was measured with unshielded diode and EBT2 films. The measurements included MLC leaf transmission, beam profiles, output factors and tissue-phantom ratios. MLC performance was evaluated for one month after commissioning. Weekly Garden Fence tests were performed for leaf / bank positioning in standard (A/P) and clinically relevant non-standard positions, before and after MLC driving exercises of 10+ minutes. Daily Picket Fence test and AQA test, End-to-End tests and dosimetric quality assurance were performed tomore » evaluate the overall system performance. Results: All measurements including beam energy, flatness and symmetry, were within manufacture specifications. Leaf transmission was 0.4% <0.5% specification. The values of output factors ranged from 0.825 (7.6 mm × 7.5 mm) to 1.026 (115.0 mm × 100.1 mm). Average beam penumbra at 10 cm depth ranged from 2.7mm/2.7mm(7.6 mm × 7.5 mm) to 6.0 mm/6.2mm(84.6 mm × 84.7 mm). Slight penumbra difference (<10% from average penumbra for fields >20 mm) was observed in the direction perpendicular to leaf motion due to the tilting of the leaf housing. Mean leaf position offsets was −0.08±0.07mm and −0.13 ± 0.08 for X1 and X2 leaf banks in 13 Garden Fence tests. No significant difference on average leaf positioning offsets was observed between different leaf orientations and before/after MLC driving exercises. Six End-to-End tests showed 0.43±0.23mm overall targeting accuracy. Picket-Fence and AQA showed stable performance of MLC during the test period. Dosimetric point dose measurements for test cases agreed with calculation within 3%. All film measurements on relative dose had Gamma (2%, 2mm) passing rate of >95%. Conclusion: The Incise™2 MLC for CyberKnife M6™ was proven to be accurate and reliable, and it is currently in clinical use. Stanford was one of the physics evaluation sites for the newly released InCise 2 MLC for Accuray Inc.« less