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Title: SU-F-T-653: Radiation Exposure from Cs-131 Permanent Seed Implants

Abstract

Purpose: Permanent seed implants have traditionally been used to treat prostate, lung and head or neck cancers using I-125 and Pd-103. Cs-131, which has higher dose rate is being used to treat brain, head and/or neck cancers in our clinic, therefore, we chose to monitor the dose received by surgeons during the extensive procedure. The aims of this work are to assess the level of radiation exposure to surgeons and the instantaneous exposure at bedside and 1 m from patients. Methods: Ten patients received Cs-131 implants for recurrent brain,head and/or neck cancer; the median implanted activity, number of implanted seeds and prescription dose at 0.5 cm from the perpendicular plane of the implant were: 54.3 mCi (14.52 – 77); 19 (4 – 24) and 60 Gy (range 42 – 60) respectively. Radiation exposure was recorded at bedside and 1 m from the patient using Victoreen ion chamber (Fluke Biomedical, Cleveland, OH). Exposure to surgeons was measured using TLD (Mirion Technologies (GDS), Inc., USA). Results: The median equivalent dose rate at 1 m and bedside immediately following implantation were 1.49×10-2 mSv/h (8.77×10-3–2.63×10-2) and 7.76×10-2 mSv/h (3.1×10-2– 1.53×10-1) respectively. Median equivalent dose to surgeons’ hands was 0.60 mSv (0.33 – 1.48) andmore » no doses were detected for whole-body. Surgical reconstruction for one patient was performed 71 days post-implant and resulted in zero exposure to surgeons. Conclusion: The recorded exposure rates were low when compared with the literature. Post procedure surveys at bed site and 1 m indicated that all patients were within safe limits for discharge (< 0.05 mSv/h at 1 m). However, as a precautionary measure, patients were advised to avoid direct contact with children and pregnant women within four weeks of the implant and stay at least at 3 ft from other people. Surgeons doses were well within occupational dose limits.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649208
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BRACHYTHERAPY; DOSE EQUIVALENTS; DOSE LIMITS; DOSE RATES; GY RANGE 10-100; HEAD; IODINE 125; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; IONS; NECK; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS; RATS

Citation Formats

Giaddui, T, Hardin, M, To, D, Kremmel, E, Peng, C, Hann, P, Richardson, S, Yu, Y, Harrison, A, and Doyle, L. SU-F-T-653: Radiation Exposure from Cs-131 Permanent Seed Implants. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956838.
Giaddui, T, Hardin, M, To, D, Kremmel, E, Peng, C, Hann, P, Richardson, S, Yu, Y, Harrison, A, & Doyle, L. SU-F-T-653: Radiation Exposure from Cs-131 Permanent Seed Implants. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956838.
Giaddui, T, Hardin, M, To, D, Kremmel, E, Peng, C, Hann, P, Richardson, S, Yu, Y, Harrison, A, and Doyle, L. Wed . "SU-F-T-653: Radiation Exposure from Cs-131 Permanent Seed Implants". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956838.
@article{osti_22649208,
title = {SU-F-T-653: Radiation Exposure from Cs-131 Permanent Seed Implants},
author = {Giaddui, T and Hardin, M and To, D and Kremmel, E and Peng, C and Hann, P and Richardson, S and Yu, Y and Harrison, A and Doyle, L},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Permanent seed implants have traditionally been used to treat prostate, lung and head or neck cancers using I-125 and Pd-103. Cs-131, which has higher dose rate is being used to treat brain, head and/or neck cancers in our clinic, therefore, we chose to monitor the dose received by surgeons during the extensive procedure. The aims of this work are to assess the level of radiation exposure to surgeons and the instantaneous exposure at bedside and 1 m from patients. Methods: Ten patients received Cs-131 implants for recurrent brain,head and/or neck cancer; the median implanted activity, number of implanted seeds and prescription dose at 0.5 cm from the perpendicular plane of the implant were: 54.3 mCi (14.52 – 77); 19 (4 – 24) and 60 Gy (range 42 – 60) respectively. Radiation exposure was recorded at bedside and 1 m from the patient using Victoreen ion chamber (Fluke Biomedical, Cleveland, OH). Exposure to surgeons was measured using TLD (Mirion Technologies (GDS), Inc., USA). Results: The median equivalent dose rate at 1 m and bedside immediately following implantation were 1.49×10-2 mSv/h (8.77×10-3–2.63×10-2) and 7.76×10-2 mSv/h (3.1×10-2– 1.53×10-1) respectively. Median equivalent dose to surgeons’ hands was 0.60 mSv (0.33 – 1.48) and no doses were detected for whole-body. Surgical reconstruction for one patient was performed 71 days post-implant and resulted in zero exposure to surgeons. Conclusion: The recorded exposure rates were low when compared with the literature. Post procedure surveys at bed site and 1 m indicated that all patients were within safe limits for discharge (< 0.05 mSv/h at 1 m). However, as a precautionary measure, patients were advised to avoid direct contact with children and pregnant women within four weeks of the implant and stay at least at 3 ft from other people. Surgeons doses were well within occupational dose limits.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956838},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Our aim in this work was to study the potential dosimetric effect of prostate edema on the accuracy of conventional pre- and post-implant dosimetry for prostate seed implants using the newly introduced {sup 131}Cs seed, whose radioactive decay half-life ({approx}9.7 days) is directly comparable to the average edema resolution half-life ({approx}10 days) observed previously by Waterman et al. for {sup 125}I implants [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41, 1069-1077 (1998)]. A systematic calculation of the relative dosimetry effect of prostate edema on the {sup 131}Cs implant was performed by using an analytic solution obtained previously [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol.more » Biol. Phys. 47, 1405-1419 (2000)]. It was found that conventional preimplant dosimetry always overestimates the true delivered dose as it ignores the temporary increase of the interseed distance caused by edema. The overestimation for {sup 131}Cs implants ranged from 1.2% (for a small edema with a magnitude of 10% and a half-life of 2 days) to approximately 45% (for larger degree edema with a magnitude of 100% and a half-life of 25 days). The magnitude of pre- and post-implant dosimetry error for {sup 131}Cs implants was found to be similar to that of {sup 103}Pd implants for typical edema characteristics (magnitude <100%, and half-life <25 days); both of which are worse compared to {sup 125}I implants. The preimplant dosimetry error for {sup 131}Cs implants cannot be compensated effectively without knowing the edema characteristics before the seed implantation. On the other hand, the error resulted from a conventional post-implant dosimetry can be minimized (to within {+-}6%) for {sup 131}Cs implants if the post-implant dosimetry is performed at 10{+-}2 days post seed implantation. This 'optimum' post-implant dosimetry time is shorter than those determined previously for the {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I implants at 16{+-}4 days and 6{+-}1 weeks, respectively.« less
  • Purpose: This work aims to determine dose variability via a brain metastases resection cavity shrinkage model (RC-SM) with I-125 or Cs-131 LDR seed implantations. Methods: The RC-SM was developed to represent sequential volume changes of 95 consecutive brain metastases patients. All patients underwent serial surveillance MR and change in cavity volume was recorded for each patient. For the initial resection cavity, a prolate-ellipsoid cavity model was suggested and applied volume shrinkage rates to correspond to 1.7, 3.6, 5.9, 11.7, and 20.5 months after craniotomy. Extra-ring structure (6mm) was added on a surface of the resection volume and the same shrinkagemore » rates were applied. Total 31 LDR seeds were evenly distributed on the surface of the resection cavity. The Amersham 6711 I-125 seed model (Oncura, Arlington Heights, IL) and the Model Cs-1 Rev2 Cs-131 seed model (IsoRay, Richland, WA) were used for TG-43U1 dose calculation and in-house-programed 3D-volumetric dose calculation system was used for resection cavity rigid model (RC-RM) and the RC-SM dose calculation. Results: The initial resection cavity volume shrunk to 25±6%, 35±6.8%, 42±7.7%, 47±9.5%, and 60±11.6%, with respect to sequential MR images post craniotomy, and the shrinkage rate (SR) was calculated as SR=56.41Xexp(−0.2024Xt)+33.99 and R-square value was 0.98. The normal brain dose as assessed via the dose to the ring structure with the RC-SM showed 29.34% and 27.95% higher than the RC-RM, I-125 and Cs-131, respectively. The dose differences between I-125 and Cs-131 seeds within the same models, I-125 cases were 9.17% and 10.35% higher than Cs-131 cases, the RC-RM and the RC-SM, respectively. Conclusion: A realistic RC-SM should be considered during LDR brain seed implementation and post-implement planning to prevent potential overdose. The RC-SM calculation shows that Cs-131 is more advantageous in sparing normal brain as the resection cavity volume changes with the LDR seeds implementation.« less
  • Recently, {sup 131}Cs seeds have been introduced for prostate permanent seed implants. This type of seed has a relatively short half-life of 9.7 days and has its most prominent emitted photon energy peaks in the 29-34 keV region. Traditionally, 145 and 125 Gy have been prescribed for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seed prostate implants, respectively. Since both the half-life and dosimetry characteristics of {sup 131}Cs seed are quite different from those of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd, the appropriate prescription dose for {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implant may well be different. This study was designed to use a linearmore » quadratic radiobiological model to determine an appropriate dose prescription scheme for permanent {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implants. In this model, prostate edema was taken into consideration. Calculations were also performed for tumors of different doubling times and for other related radiobiological parameters of different values. As expected, the derived prescription dose values were dependent on type of tumors and types of edema. However, for prostate cancers in which tumor cells are relatively slow growing and are reported to have a mean potential doubling time of around 40 days, the appropriate prescription dose for permanent {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implants was determined to be: 127{sub -12}{sup +5}Gy if the experiences of {sup 125}I seed implants were followed and 121{sub -3}{sup +0}Gy if the experiences of {sup 103}Pd seed implants were followed.« less
  • Purpose: To study the influence of prostatic edema on postimplant physical and radiobiological parameters using {sup 131}Cs permanent prostate seed implants. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients with early prostate cancer who underwent {sup 131}Cs permanent seed implantation were evaluated. Dose-volume histograms were generated for each set of prostate volumes obtained at preimplantation and postimplantion days 0, 14, and 28 to compute quality indices (QIs) and fractional doses at level x (FD{sub x}). A set of equations for QI, FD{sub x}, and biologically effective doses at dose level D{sub x} (BED{sub x}) were defined to account for edema changes with timemore » after implant. Results: There were statistically significant differences found between QIs of pre- and postimplant plans at day 0, except for the overdose index (ODI). QIs correlated with postimplant time, and FD{sub x} was found to increase with increasing postimplant time. With the effect of edema, BED at different dose levels showed less improvement due to the short half-life of {sup 131}Cs, which delivers about 85% of the prescribed dose before the prostate reaches its original volume due to dissipation of edema. Conclusions: Results of the study show that QIs, FD{sub x}, and BEDs at the level of D{sub x} changed from preneedle plans to postimplant plans and have statistically significant differences (p < 0.05), except for the ODI (p = 0.106), which suggests that at the time of {sup 131}C seed implantation, the effect of edema must be accounted for when defining the seed positions, to avoid the possibility of poor dosimetric and radiobiologic results for {sup 131}Cs seed implants.« less
  • Purpose: Post-implant dosimetry has become the gold standard for prostate implant evaluation. The goal of this research is to compare the dosimetry between pre-plan and post-plan in permanent prostate seed implant brachytherapy. Methods: A retrospective study of 91 patients treated with Iodine-125 prostate seed implant between year 2012∼2014 were performed. All plans were created using a VariSeed 8.0 planning system. Pre-plan ultrasound images were acquired using 0.5 cm slice thickness. Post-plan CT images acquired about 1–4 weeks after implant, fused with the preplan ultrasound images. The prostate and urethra contours were generated using the fusion of ultrasound and CT images.more » Iodine-125 seed source activities varied between 0.382 to 0.414 mCi per seed. The loading patterns varied slightly between patients depending on the prostate size. Statistical analysis of pre and post plans for prostate and urethra volumes, V100%, V150% and D90, and urethra D10 were performed and reported. Results: The pre and post implant average prostate size was 36.90cc vs. 38.58cc; V100% was 98.33% vs. 96.89%; V150% was 47.09% vs. 56.95%; D90 was 116.35Gy vs. 116.12Gy, urethra volume was 1.72cc vs. 1.85cc, urethra D10% was 122.0% vs. 135.35%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the pre and post-plan values for D90(p-value=0.43). However, there are significant differences between other parameters most likely due to post surgical edema; prostate size (p-value= 0.00015); V100% (p-value=3.7803E-07); V150% (p-value=1.49E-09); urethra volume (p-value= 2.77E-06); Urethra D10 (p-value=7.37E-11). Conclusion: The post-plan dosimetry using CT image set showed similar D90 dose coverage to the pre-plan using the ultrasound image dataset. The study showed that our prostate seed implants have consistently delivered adequate therapeutic dose to the prostate while sparing urethra. Future studies to correlate dose versus biochemical response using patients’ PSA values as well as patients’ survival are warranted.« less