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Title: SU-F-T-648: Sharpening Dose Fall-Off Via Beam Number Enhancements For Stereotactic Brain Radiosurgery

Abstract

Purpose: Sharp dose fall-off is the hallmark of brain radiosurgery to deliver a high dose of radiation to the target while minimizing dose to normal brain tissue. In this study, we developed a technique for the purpose of enhancing the peripheral dose gradient by magnifying the total number of beams focused toward each isocenter via patient head tilt and simultaneous beam intensity modulations. Methods: Computer scripting for the proposed beam number enhancement (BNE) technique was developed. The technique was tested and then implemented on a clinical treatment planning system for a dedicated brain radiosurgical system (GK Perfexion, Elekta Oncology). To study technical feasibility and dosimetric advantages of the technique, we compared treatment planning quality and delivery efficiency for 20 radiosurgical cases previously treated at our institution. These cases included relatively complex treatments such as acoustic schwannoma, meningioma, brain metastasis and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Results: The BNE treatment plans were found to produce nearly identical target volume coverage (absolute value < 0.5%, P > 0.2) and dose conformity (BNE CI= 1.41±0.15 versus 1.41±0.20, P>0.9) as the original treatment plans. The total beam-on time for theBNE treatment plans were comparable (within 1.0 min or 1.8%) with those of the original treatmentmore » plans for all the cases. However, BNE treatment plans significantly improved the mean gradient index (BNE GI = 2.9±0.3 versus original GI =3.0±0.3 p<0.0001) and low-level isodose volumes, e.g. 20-50% prescribed isodose volumes, by 2.0% to 5.0% (p<0.02). Furthermore, with 4 to 5-fold increase in the total number of beams, the GI decreased by as much as 20% or 0.5 in absolute values. Conclusion: BNE via head tilt and simultaneous beam intensity modulation is an effective and efficient technique that physically sharpens the peripheral dose gradient for brain radiosurgery.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)
  2. Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649205
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BEAMS; BRAIN; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY

Citation Formats

Chiu, J, Braunstein, S, McDermott, M, Sneed, P, Ma, L, and Pierce, M. SU-F-T-648: Sharpening Dose Fall-Off Via Beam Number Enhancements For Stereotactic Brain Radiosurgery. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956833.
Chiu, J, Braunstein, S, McDermott, M, Sneed, P, Ma, L, & Pierce, M. SU-F-T-648: Sharpening Dose Fall-Off Via Beam Number Enhancements For Stereotactic Brain Radiosurgery. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956833.
Chiu, J, Braunstein, S, McDermott, M, Sneed, P, Ma, L, and Pierce, M. 2016. "SU-F-T-648: Sharpening Dose Fall-Off Via Beam Number Enhancements For Stereotactic Brain Radiosurgery". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956833.
@article{osti_22649205,
title = {SU-F-T-648: Sharpening Dose Fall-Off Via Beam Number Enhancements For Stereotactic Brain Radiosurgery},
author = {Chiu, J and Braunstein, S and McDermott, M and Sneed, P and Ma, L and Pierce, M},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Sharp dose fall-off is the hallmark of brain radiosurgery to deliver a high dose of radiation to the target while minimizing dose to normal brain tissue. In this study, we developed a technique for the purpose of enhancing the peripheral dose gradient by magnifying the total number of beams focused toward each isocenter via patient head tilt and simultaneous beam intensity modulations. Methods: Computer scripting for the proposed beam number enhancement (BNE) technique was developed. The technique was tested and then implemented on a clinical treatment planning system for a dedicated brain radiosurgical system (GK Perfexion, Elekta Oncology). To study technical feasibility and dosimetric advantages of the technique, we compared treatment planning quality and delivery efficiency for 20 radiosurgical cases previously treated at our institution. These cases included relatively complex treatments such as acoustic schwannoma, meningioma, brain metastasis and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Results: The BNE treatment plans were found to produce nearly identical target volume coverage (absolute value < 0.5%, P > 0.2) and dose conformity (BNE CI= 1.41±0.15 versus 1.41±0.20, P>0.9) as the original treatment plans. The total beam-on time for theBNE treatment plans were comparable (within 1.0 min or 1.8%) with those of the original treatment plans for all the cases. However, BNE treatment plans significantly improved the mean gradient index (BNE GI = 2.9±0.3 versus original GI =3.0±0.3 p<0.0001) and low-level isodose volumes, e.g. 20-50% prescribed isodose volumes, by 2.0% to 5.0% (p<0.02). Furthermore, with 4 to 5-fold increase in the total number of beams, the GI decreased by as much as 20% or 0.5 in absolute values. Conclusion: BNE via head tilt and simultaneous beam intensity modulation is an effective and efficient technique that physically sharpens the peripheral dose gradient for brain radiosurgery.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956833},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To develop a treatment delivery and planning strategy by increasing the number of beams to minimize dose to brain tissue surrounding a target, while maximizing dose coverage to the target. Methods: We analyzed 14 different treatment plans via Leksell PFX and 4C. For standardization, single tumor cases were chosen. Original treatment plans were compared with two optimized plans. The number of beams was increased in treatment plans by varying tilt angles of the patient head, while maintaining original isocenter and the beam positions in the x-, y- and z-axes, collimator size, and beam blocking. PFX optimized plans increased beammore » numbers with three pre-set tilt angles, 70, 90, 110, and 4C optimized plans increased beam numbers with tilt angles increasing arbitrarily from range of 30 to 150 degrees. Optimized treatment plans were compared dosimetrically with original treatment plans. Results: Comparing total normal tissue isodose volumes between original and optimized plans, the low-level percentage isodose volumes decreased in all plans. Despite the addition of multiple beams up to a factor of 25, beam-on times for 1 tilt angle versus 3 or more tilt angles were comparable (<1 min.). In 64% (9/14) of the studied cases, the volume percentage decrease by >5%, with the highest value reaching 19%. The addition of more tilt angles correlates to a greater decrease in normal brain irradiated volume. Selectivity and coverage for original and optimized plans remained comparable. Conclusion: Adding large number of additional focused beams with variable patient head tilt shows improvement for dose fall-off for brain radiosurgery. The study demonstrates technical feasibility of adding beams to decrease target volume.« less
  • Purpose: Sharp dose fall off outside a tumor is essential for high dose single fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) plans. This study explores the relationship among tumor dose inhomogeneity, conformity, and dose fall off in normal tissues for micromultileaf collimator (mMLC) linear accelerator (LINAC) based cranial SRS plans. Methods: Between January 2007 and July 2009, 65 patients with single cranial lesions were treated with LINAC-based SRS. Among them, tumors had maximum diameters {<=}20 mm: 31; between 20 and 30 mm: 21; and >30 mm: 13. All patients were treated with 6 MV photons on a Trilogy linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems,more » Palo Alto, CA) with a tertiary m3 high-resolution mMLC (Brainlab, Feldkirchen, Germany), using either noncoplanar conformal fixed fields or dynamic conformal arcs. The authors also created retrospective study plans with identical beam arrangement as the treated plan but with different tumor dose inhomogeneity by varying the beam margins around the planning target volume (PTV). All retrospective study plans were normalized so that the minimum PTV dose was the prescription dose (PD). Isocenter dose, mean PTV dose, RTOG conformity index (CI), RTOG homogeneity index (HI), dose gradient index R{sub 50}-R{sub 100} (defined as the difference between equivalent sphere radius of 50% isodose volume and prescription isodose volume), and normal tissue volume (as a ratio to PTV volume) receiving 50% prescription dose (NTV{sub 50}) were calculated. Results: HI was inversely related to the beam margins around the PTV. CI had a ''V'' shaped relationship with HI, reaching a minimum when HI was approximately 1.3. Isocenter dose and mean PTV dose (as percentage of PD) increased linearly with HI. R{sub 50}-R{sub 100} and NTV{sub 50} initially declined with HI and then reached a plateau when HI was approximately 1.3. These trends also held when tumors were grouped according to their maximum diameters. The smallest tumor group (maximum diameters {<=}20 mm) had the most HI dependence for dose fall off. For treated plans, CI averaged 2.55{+-}0.79 with HI 1.23{+-}0.06; the average R{sub 50}-R{sub 100} was 0.41{+-}0.08, 0.55{+-}0.10, and 0.65{+-}0.09 cm, respectively, for tumors {<=}20 mm, between 20 and 30 mm, and >30 mm. Conclusions: Tumor dose inhomogeneity can be used as an important and convenient parameter to evaluate mMLC LINAC-based SRS plans. Sharp dose fall off in the normal tissue is achieved with sufficiently high tumor dose inhomogeneity. By adjusting beam margins, a homogeneity index of approximately 1.3 would provide best conformity for the authors' SRS system.« less
  • Purpose: Existing dose guidelines for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) are primarily based on single-target treatment data. This study investigated dose guidelines for multiple targets treated with SRS. Methods and Materials: A physical model was developed to relate the peripheral isodose volume dependence on an increasing number of targets and prescription dose per target. The model was derived from simulated and clinical multiple brain metastatic cases treated with the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion at several institutions, where the total number of targets ranged from 2 to 60. The relative increase in peripheral isodose volumes, such as the 12-Gy volume, was studiedmore » in the multitarget treatment setting based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 90-05 study dose levels. Results: A significant increase in the 12-Gy peripheral isodose volumes was found in comparing multiple target SRS to single-target SRS. This increase strongly correlated (R{sup 2} = 0.92) with the total number of targets but not the total target volumes (R{sup 2} = 0.06). On the basis of the correlated curve, the 12-Gy volume for multiple target treatment was found to increase by approximately 1% per target when a low target dose such as 15 Gy was used, but approximately 4% per target when a high dose such as 20-24 Gy was used. Reduction in the prescription dose was quantified for each prescription level in maintaining the 12-Gy volume. Conclusion: Normal brain dose increases predictably with increasing number of targets for multitarget SRS. A reduction of approximately 1-2 Gy in the prescribed dose is needed compared with single target radiosurgery.« less
  • At University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is performed by using a linear accelerator with an add-on micromultileaf collimator (mMLC). In our clinical setting, static jaws are automatically adapted to the furthest edge of the mMLC-defined segments with 2-mm (X jaw) and 5-mm (Y jaw) margin and the same jaw values are applied for all beam angles in the treatment planning system. This additional field gap between the static jaws and the mMLC allows additional radiation dose to normal brain tissue. Because a radiosurgery procedure consists of a single high dose to the planning targetmore » volume (PTV), reduction of unnecessary dose to normal brain tissue near the PTV is important, particularly for pediatric patients whose brains are still developing or when a critical organ, such as the optic chiasm, is near the PTV. The purpose of this study was to minimize dose to normal brain tissue by allowing minimal static jaw margin around the mMLC-defined fields and different static jaw values for each beam angle or arc. Dose output factors were measured with various static jaw margins and the results were compared with calculated doses in the treatment planning system. Ten patient plans were randomly selected and recalculated with zero static jaw margins without changing other parameters. Changes of PTV coverage, mean dose to predefined normal brain tissue volume adjacent to PTV, and monitor units were compared. It was found that the dose output percentage difference varied from 4.9-1.3% for the maximum static jaw opening vs. static jaw with zero margins. The mean dose to normal brain tissue at risk adjacent to the PTV was reduced by an average of 1.9%, with negligible PTV coverage loss. This dose reduction strategy may be meaningful in terms of late effects of radiation, particularly in pediatric patients. This study generated clinical knowledge and tools to consistently minimize dose to normal brain tissue.« less
  • Purpose: 1. online verification of patient position during treatment using calypso electromagnetic localization and tracking system. 2. Verification and comparison of positional accuracy between cone beam computed tomography and calypso system. 3. Presenting the advantage of continuation localization in Stereotactic radiosurgery treatments. Methods: Ten brain tumor cases were taken for this study. Patients with head mask were under gone Computed Tomography (CT). Before scanning, mask was cut on the fore head area to keep surface beacons on the skin. Slice thickness of 0.65 mm were taken for this study. x, y, z coordinates of these beacons in TPS were enteredmore » into tracking station. Varian True Beam accelerator, equipped with On Board Imager was used to take Cone beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) to localize the patient. Simultaneously Surface beacons were used to localize and track the patient throughout the treatment. The localization values were compared in both systems. For localization CBCT considered as reference. Tracking was done throughout the treatment using Calypso tracking system using electromagnetic array. This array was in tracking position during imaging and treatment. Flattening Filter free beams of 6MV photons along with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy was used for the treatment. The patient movement was observed throughout the treatment ranging from 2 min to 4 min. Results: The average variation observed between calypso system and CBCT localization was less than 0.5 mm. These variations were due to manual errors while keeping beacon on the patient. Less than 0.05 cm intra-fraction motion was observed throughout the treatment with the help of continuous tracking. Conclusion: Calypso target localization system is one of the finest tools to perform radiosurgery in combination with CBCT. This non radiographic method of tracking is a real beneficial method to treat patients confidently while observing real-time motion information of the patient.« less