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Title: SU-F-T-636: Comprehensive Approach to Motion Assessment for Liver and Pancreas SBRT Patients

Abstract

Purpose: Our past practice for liver and pancreas SBRT consisted of free breathing (FB) with gated treatment delivery using a 30-70% phase window. We have recently adopted an assessment method leading to individualized motion management to minimize target motion. We present our results from 47 patients treated with this new approach. Methods: We perform an initial patient coaching and assessment session in our conventional simulator suite to observe the motion of the implanted fiducials with FB anterior and lateral 20-second cine acquisitions. The physician decides whether to attempt inhale or exhale breath-hold (BH). The patient is coached while observing with cine to ascertain their ability to achieve the desired BH mode for long periods as needed for treatment delivery. If the patient cannot comply, a FB approach is adopted using gating or simple ITV method (for patients without fiducials). After achieving a patient-specific motion management mode, we perform CT-simulation using the Varian RPM system to reproduce the chosen mode and record a reference session for treatment delivery. For pre-treatment imaging, the fiducials are observed under fluoro while coaching the patient. Results: Of 47 SBRT cases analyzed, 32 were liver and 15 were pancreas. The chosen techniques were: 32 exhale BHmore » (12 with abdominal compression), 7 FB gated, 4 inhale BH, and 4 FB ITV. Maximum fiducial motion amplitude was 5 mm for the FB gated patients, and less than 5 mm for all BH patients with most able to achieve a maximum amplitude of 3 mm. Conclusion: This study showed that an individualized motion management approach can reduce the target volume and, therefore, the volume of irradiated healthy tissue from liver or pancreas SBRT. Effective coaching is essential in achieving consistent BH with 3 mm amplitude. The fluoro/cine session is helpful in establishing the right coaching approach for each patient.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, Burlington, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649196
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; AMPLITUDES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; DELIVERY; LIVER; PANCREAS; PATIENTS

Citation Formats

Halvorsen, P, Iftimia, I, and Hunter, K. SU-F-T-636: Comprehensive Approach to Motion Assessment for Liver and Pancreas SBRT Patients. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956821.
Halvorsen, P, Iftimia, I, & Hunter, K. SU-F-T-636: Comprehensive Approach to Motion Assessment for Liver and Pancreas SBRT Patients. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956821.
Halvorsen, P, Iftimia, I, and Hunter, K. 2016. "SU-F-T-636: Comprehensive Approach to Motion Assessment for Liver and Pancreas SBRT Patients". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956821.
@article{osti_22649196,
title = {SU-F-T-636: Comprehensive Approach to Motion Assessment for Liver and Pancreas SBRT Patients},
author = {Halvorsen, P and Iftimia, I and Hunter, K},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Our past practice for liver and pancreas SBRT consisted of free breathing (FB) with gated treatment delivery using a 30-70% phase window. We have recently adopted an assessment method leading to individualized motion management to minimize target motion. We present our results from 47 patients treated with this new approach. Methods: We perform an initial patient coaching and assessment session in our conventional simulator suite to observe the motion of the implanted fiducials with FB anterior and lateral 20-second cine acquisitions. The physician decides whether to attempt inhale or exhale breath-hold (BH). The patient is coached while observing with cine to ascertain their ability to achieve the desired BH mode for long periods as needed for treatment delivery. If the patient cannot comply, a FB approach is adopted using gating or simple ITV method (for patients without fiducials). After achieving a patient-specific motion management mode, we perform CT-simulation using the Varian RPM system to reproduce the chosen mode and record a reference session for treatment delivery. For pre-treatment imaging, the fiducials are observed under fluoro while coaching the patient. Results: Of 47 SBRT cases analyzed, 32 were liver and 15 were pancreas. The chosen techniques were: 32 exhale BH (12 with abdominal compression), 7 FB gated, 4 inhale BH, and 4 FB ITV. Maximum fiducial motion amplitude was 5 mm for the FB gated patients, and less than 5 mm for all BH patients with most able to achieve a maximum amplitude of 3 mm. Conclusion: This study showed that an individualized motion management approach can reduce the target volume and, therefore, the volume of irradiated healthy tissue from liver or pancreas SBRT. Effective coaching is essential in achieving consistent BH with 3 mm amplitude. The fluoro/cine session is helpful in establishing the right coaching approach for each patient.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956821},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) procedures for pancreatic cancer present a challenge in motion management because the target is directly adjacent to critical structures and the target is subject to significant respiratory motion. Gated treatment is usually planned with a tight (few mm) PTV margin. The positioning and setup relies on on-board-imaging (OBI) of internal fiducials. This study evaluates the corrections for inter- and intra-fractional target motion as evidenced by the OBI. Methods: 20 patients with gated pancreas SBRT treatment were setup with KV imaging guidance before and during each treatment. The couch position was fine-tuned to align withmore » the internal fiducials for each patient. The data for 148 intra- and 111 inter-fractional couch movements were captured and analyzed. Results: The mean ± standard deviation of couch shifts for the initial daily setup is 4.9±4.1 mm for couch vertical, 5.3±4.6 mm for couch longitudinal, and 3.7±4.0 mm for couch lateral. The mean ± standard deviation of intra-treatment adjustments are 1.1±1.6, 2.5±3.8, and 1.1±1.8 mm for couch vertical, longitudinal and lateral. The probability of intra-fractional motion in the three orthogonal directions with magnitude no more than 2 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm is 55%, 68% and 84% respectively. Conclusion: The intra-treatment target motion for pancreas SBRT patients indicates that a PTV margin of 5mm may be necessary.« less
  • Purpose Ultrasound tracking of target motion relies on visibility of vascular and/or anatomical landmark. However this is challenging when the target is located far from vascular structures or in organs that lack ultrasound landmark structure, such as in the case of pancreas cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate visibility, artifacts and distortions of fusion coils and solid gold markers in ultrasound, CT, CBCT and kV images to identify markers suitable for real-time ultrasound tracking of tumor motion in SBRT pancreas treatment. Methods Two fusion coils (1mm × 5mm and 1mm × 10 mm) and a solid goldmore » marker (0.8mm × 10mm) were embedded in a tissue–like ultrasound phantom. The phantom (5cm × 12cm × 20cm) was prepared using water, gelatin and psyllium-hydrophilic-mucilloid fiber. Psylliumhydrophilic mucilloid acts as scattering medium to produce echo texture that simulates sonographic appearance of human tissue in ultrasound images while maintaining electron density close to that of water in CT images. Ultrasound images were acquired using 3D-ultrasound system with markers embedded at 5, 10 and 15mm depth from phantom surface. CT images were acquired using Philips Big Bore CT while CBCT and kV images were acquired with XVI-system (Elexta). Visual analysis was performed to compare visibility of the markers and visibility score (1 to 3) were assigned. Results All markers embedded at various depths are clearly visible (score of 3) in ultrasound images. Good visibility of all markers is observed in CT, CBCT and kV images. The degree of artifact produced by the markers in CT and CBCT images are indistinguishable. No distortion is observed in images from any modalities. Conclusion All markers are visible in images across all modalities in this homogenous tissue-like phantom. Human subject data is necessary to confirm the marker type suitable for real-time ultrasound tracking of tumor motion in SBRT pancreas treatment.« less
  • Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has recently emerged as a valid option for treating liver metastases. SBRT delivers highly conformai dose over a small number of fractions. As such it is particularly sensitive to the accuracy of target volume delineation by the radiation oncologist. However, contouring liver metastases remains challenging for the following reasons. First, the liver usually undergoes significant motion due to respiration. Second, liver metastases are often nearly indistinguishable from the surrounding tissue when using computed tomography (CT) for imaging making it difficult to identify and delineate them. Both problems can be overcome by using four dimensional CTmore » (4DCT) synchronized with intravenous contrast injection. We describe a novel CT simulation process which involves two 4DCT scans. The first scan captures the tumor and immediately surrounding tissue which in turn reduces the 4DCT scan time so that it can be optimally timed with intravenous contrast injection. The second 4DCT scan covers a larger volume and is used as the primary CT dataset for dose calculation, as well as patient setup verification on the treatment unit. The combination of two 4DCT scans, short and long, allows visualization of the liver metastases over all phases of breathing cycle while simultaneously acquiring long enough 4DCT dataset suitable for planning and patient setup verification.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the proportion of liver SBRT cases in which robotic ultrasound image guidance concurrent with beam delivery can be deployed without interfering with clinically used VMAT beam configurations. Methods: A simulation environment incorporating LINAC, couch, planning CT, and robotic ultrasound guidance hardware was developed. Virtual placement of the robotic ultrasound hardware was guided by a target visibility map rendered on the CT surface. The map was computed on GPU by using the planning CT to simulate ultrasound propagation and attenuation along rays connecting skin surface points to a rasterized imaging target. The visibility map was validated in amore » prostate phantom experiment by capturing live ultrasound images of the prostate from different phantom locations. In 20 liver SBRT patients treated with VMAT, the simulation environment was used to place the robotic hardware and ultrasound probe at imaging locations indicated on the visibility map. Imaging targets were either entire PTV (range 5.9–679.5 ml) or entire GTV (range 0.9–343.4 ml). Presence or absence of mechanical collisions with LINAC, couch, and patient body as well as interferences with treated beams were recorded. Results: For PTV targets, robotic ultrasound guidance without mechanical collision was possible in 80% of the cases and guidance without beam interference was possible in 60% of the cases. For the smaller GTV targets, these proportions were 95% and 85% correspondingly. GTV size (1/20), elongated shape (1/20), and depth (1/20) were the main factors limiting the availability of non-interfering imaging positions. Conclusion: This study indicates that for VMAT liver SBRT, robotic ultrasound tracking of a relevant internal target would be possible in 85% of cases while using treatment plans currently deployed in the clinic. With beam re-planning in accordance with the presence of robotic ultrasound guidance, intra-fractional ultrasound guidance may be an option for 95% of the liver SBRT cases. This project was funded by NIH Grant R41CA174089.« less
  • Purpose: Previous studies have shown that radiotherapy treatment for liver metastases causes marked liver hypertrophy in areas receiving low dose and atrophy/fibrosis in areas receiving high dose. The purpose of this work is to develop and evaluate a biomechanical model-based dose-response model to describe these liver responses to SBRT. Methods: In this retrospective study, a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm, Morfeus, was expanded to include dose-based boundary conditions. Liver and tumor volumes were contoured on the planning images and CT/MR images three months post-RT and converted to finite element models. A thermal expansion-based relationship correlating the delivered dose and volumemore » response was generated from 22 patients previously treated. This coefficient, combined with the planned dose, was applied as an additional boundary condition to describe the volumetric response of the liver of an additional cohort of metastatic liver patients treated with SBRT. The accuracy of the model was evaluated based on overall volumetric liver comparisons and the target registration error (TRE) using the average deviations in positions of identified vascular bifurcations on each set of registered images, with a target accuracy of the 2.5mm isotropic dose grid (vector dimension 4.3mm). Results: The thermal expansion coefficient models the volumetric change of the liver to within 3%. The accuracy of Morfeus with dose-expansion boundary conditions a TRE of 5.7±2.8mm compared to 11.2±3.7mm using rigid registration and 8.9±0.28mm using Morfeus with only spatial boundary conditions. Conclusion: A biomechanical model has been developed to describe the volumetric and spatial response of the liver to SBRT. This work will enable the improvement of correlating functional imaging with delivered dose, the mapping of the delivered dose from one treatment onto the planning images for a subsequent treatment, and will further provide information to assist with the biological characterization of patients’ response to radiation.« less