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Title: SU-F-T-632: On the Use of Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy for Thoracic Vertebral Metastases SBRT Treatment

Abstract

Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate quality, efficiency and delivery accuracy of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) plans for thoracic-vertebral metastases using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: After obtaining approval of RPC-benchmark plan, seven previously treated thoracic-vertebral metastases patients with non-coplanar hybrid arcs(NC-HA)using 1–2 3D-dynamic conformal partial-arcs plus 7–9 IMRT-beams were re-optimized with IMAT using 3 full co-planar arcs. Tumors were located between T2–T7. T1/T2-weighted MRI images were co-registered with planning-CT. PTVs were between 24.3–240.1cc(median=48.1cc). Prescription was 30Gy in 5 fractions with 6-MV beams at Novalis-TX consisting of HD-MLC.Plans were compared for target coverage:conformality index(CI),homogeneity index(HI),PTVD90. Organs-at-risks(OARs)was evaluated for spinal cord(Dmax, D0.35cc, and D1.2cc), esophagus(Dmax and D5cc),heart(Dmax, D15cc)and lung(V5 and V10). Dose delivery efficiency and accuracy of each IMAT plan was assessed via quality assurance(QA) plan. Beam-on time was recorded and a gamma index was used to compare agreement between planned and measured doses. Results: SBRT IMAT plans resulted in superior CI(1.02 vs. 1.36, p=0.05) and HI (0.14 vs. 0.27, p=0.01). PTVD90 was improved but statistically insignificant (31.0 vs. 30.4Gy, p=0.38). IMAT resulted in statistically significant improvements in OARs sparing: esophagus max(22.5 vs. 27.0Gy, p=0.03), esophagus 5cc (17.6 vs. 21.5Gy, p=0.02) and heart max(13.1 vs. 15.8Gy, p=0.03). Spinal cord,lung V5 and V10more » were lower but statistically insignificant. Average total MU and beam-on time were 2598±354 vs. 3542±495 and 4.7±0.6 min vs. 7.1±1.0min for IMAT vs. NC-HA (without accounting for couch kicks time for NC-HA). IMAT plans demonstrated an accurate dose delivery of 95.5±1.0% for clinical gamma passing-rate of 2%/2mm criteria on MapCHECK, that was comparable to NC-HA plans. Conclusion: IMAT plans provided highly conformal and homogeneous dose distributions to target and reduced OARs doses compared to NC-HA. Total MU was reduced by a factor of 1.4 and subsequently decreased treatment times significantly - potentially minimizing intra-fraction motion error and owing to patient comfort. SBRT using IMAT planning for single fraction thoracic-vertebrae metastases will be investigated.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649192
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; DELIVERY; ESOPHAGUS; METASTASES; NMR IMAGING; PLANNING; QUALITY ASSURANCE; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIOTHERAPY; SPINAL CORD

Citation Formats

Pokhrel, D, Mallory, M, Badkul, R, Jiang, H, Saleh, H, Wang, F, and Lominska, C. SU-F-T-632: On the Use of Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy for Thoracic Vertebral Metastases SBRT Treatment. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956817.
Pokhrel, D, Mallory, M, Badkul, R, Jiang, H, Saleh, H, Wang, F, & Lominska, C. SU-F-T-632: On the Use of Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy for Thoracic Vertebral Metastases SBRT Treatment. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956817.
Pokhrel, D, Mallory, M, Badkul, R, Jiang, H, Saleh, H, Wang, F, and Lominska, C. 2016. "SU-F-T-632: On the Use of Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy for Thoracic Vertebral Metastases SBRT Treatment". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956817.
@article{osti_22649192,
title = {SU-F-T-632: On the Use of Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy for Thoracic Vertebral Metastases SBRT Treatment},
author = {Pokhrel, D and Mallory, M and Badkul, R and Jiang, H and Saleh, H and Wang, F and Lominska, C},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate quality, efficiency and delivery accuracy of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) plans for thoracic-vertebral metastases using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: After obtaining approval of RPC-benchmark plan, seven previously treated thoracic-vertebral metastases patients with non-coplanar hybrid arcs(NC-HA)using 1–2 3D-dynamic conformal partial-arcs plus 7–9 IMRT-beams were re-optimized with IMAT using 3 full co-planar arcs. Tumors were located between T2–T7. T1/T2-weighted MRI images were co-registered with planning-CT. PTVs were between 24.3–240.1cc(median=48.1cc). Prescription was 30Gy in 5 fractions with 6-MV beams at Novalis-TX consisting of HD-MLC.Plans were compared for target coverage:conformality index(CI),homogeneity index(HI),PTVD90. Organs-at-risks(OARs)was evaluated for spinal cord(Dmax, D0.35cc, and D1.2cc), esophagus(Dmax and D5cc),heart(Dmax, D15cc)and lung(V5 and V10). Dose delivery efficiency and accuracy of each IMAT plan was assessed via quality assurance(QA) plan. Beam-on time was recorded and a gamma index was used to compare agreement between planned and measured doses. Results: SBRT IMAT plans resulted in superior CI(1.02 vs. 1.36, p=0.05) and HI (0.14 vs. 0.27, p=0.01). PTVD90 was improved but statistically insignificant (31.0 vs. 30.4Gy, p=0.38). IMAT resulted in statistically significant improvements in OARs sparing: esophagus max(22.5 vs. 27.0Gy, p=0.03), esophagus 5cc (17.6 vs. 21.5Gy, p=0.02) and heart max(13.1 vs. 15.8Gy, p=0.03). Spinal cord,lung V5 and V10 were lower but statistically insignificant. Average total MU and beam-on time were 2598±354 vs. 3542±495 and 4.7±0.6 min vs. 7.1±1.0min for IMAT vs. NC-HA (without accounting for couch kicks time for NC-HA). IMAT plans demonstrated an accurate dose delivery of 95.5±1.0% for clinical gamma passing-rate of 2%/2mm criteria on MapCHECK, that was comparable to NC-HA plans. Conclusion: IMAT plans provided highly conformal and homogeneous dose distributions to target and reduced OARs doses compared to NC-HA. Total MU was reduced by a factor of 1.4 and subsequently decreased treatment times significantly - potentially minimizing intra-fraction motion error and owing to patient comfort. SBRT using IMAT planning for single fraction thoracic-vertebrae metastases will be investigated.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956817},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Recent clinical studies have shown a correlation between radiation dose to the thoracic vertebral bodies (TVB) and the development of hematologic toxicity (HT) in patients receiving chemoradiation (CRT) for lung cancer (LuCa). The feasibility of a bone-marrow sparing (BMS) approach in this group of patients is unknown. We hypothesized that radiation dose to the TVB can be reduced with an intensity modulated radiation therapy(IMRT)/volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy(VMAT) without affecting plan quality. Methods: We identified LuCa cases treated with curative intent CRT using IMRT/VMAT from 4/2009 to 2/2015. The TVBs from T1–T10 were retrospectively contoured. No constraints were placed onmore » the TVB structure initially. A subset were re-planned with BMS-IMRT/VMAT with an objective or reducing the mean TVB dose to <23 Gy. The following data were collected on the initial and BMS plans: mean dose to planning target volume (PTV), lungs-PTV, esophagus, heart; lung V20; cord max dose. Pairwise comparisons were performed using the signed rank test. Results: 94 cases received CRT with IMRT/VMAT. We selected 11 cases (7 IMRT, 4 VMAT) with a range of initial mean TVB doses (median 35.7 Gy, range 18.9–41.4 Gy). Median prescription dose was 60 Gy. BMS-IMRT/VMAT significantly reduced the mean TVB dose by a median of 10.2 Gy (range, 1.0–16.7 Gy, p=0.001) and reduced the cord max dose by 2.9 Gy (p=0.014). BMS-IMRT/VMAT had no impact on lung mean (median +17 cGy, p=0.700), lung V20 (median +0.5%, p=0.898), esophagus mean (median +13 cGy, p=1.000) or heart mean (median +16 cGy, p=0.365). PTV-mean dose was not affected by BMS-IMRT/VMAT (median +13 cGy, p=0.653). Conclusion: BMS-IMRT/VMAT was able to significantly reduce radiation dose to the TVB without compromising plan quality. Prospective evaluation of BMS-IMRT/VMAT in patients receiving CRT for LuCa is warranted to determine if this approach results in clinically significant reductions in HT.« less
  • Purpose: This study evaluates the dosimetric differences using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients previously treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy IMRT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in early stage lung cancer. Methods: We evaluated 9 consecutive medically inoperable lung cancer patients at the start of the SBRT program who were treated with IMRT from November 2010 to October 2011. These patients were treated using 6 MV energy. The 9 cases were then re-planned with VMAT performed with arc therapy using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) energy with the same organs at risk (OARS) constraints. Data collected formore » the treatment plans included target coverage, beam on time, dose to OARS and gamma pass rate. Results: Five patients were T1N0 and four patients were T2N0 with all tumors less than 5 cm. The average GTV was 13.02 cm3 (0.83–40.87) and average PTV was 44.65 cm3 (14.06–118.08). The IMRT plans had a mean of 7.2 angles (6–9) and 5.4 minutes (3.6–11.1) per plan. The VMAT plans had a mean of 2.8 arcs (2–3) and 4.0 minutes (2.2–6.0) per plan. VMAT had slightly more target coverage than IMRT with average increase in D95 of 2.68% (1.24–5.73) and D99 of 3.65% (0.88–8.77). VMAT produced lower doses to all OARs. The largest reductions were in maximum doses to the spinal cord with an average reduction of 24.1%, esophagus with an average reduction of 22.1%, and lung with an average reduction in the V20 of 16.3% The mean gamma pass rate was 99.8% (99.2–100) at 3 mm and 3% for VMAT with comparable values for IMRT. Conclusion: These findings suggest that using VMAT for SBRT in early stage lung cancer is superior to IMRT in terms of dose coverage, OAR dose and a lower treatment delivery time with a similar gamma pass rate.« less
  • Purpose: The cylindrical symmetry of vertebrae favors the use of volumetric modulated arc therapy in generating a dose ''hole'' on the center of the vertebrae limiting the dose to the spinal cord. The authors have evaluated if collimator angle is a significant parameter for dose distribution optimization in vertebral metastases. Methods: Three patients with one-three vertebrae involved were considered. Twenty-one differently optimized plans (nine single-arc and 12 double-arc plans) were performed, testing various collimator angle positions. Clinical target volume was defined as the whole vertebrae, excluding the spinal cord canal. The planning target volume (PTV) was defined as CTV+5 mm.more » Dose prescription was 5x4 Gy{sup 2} with normalization to PTV mean dose. The dose at 1 cm{sup 3} of spinal cord was limited to 11.5Gy. Results: The best plans in terms of target coverage and spinal cord sparing were achieved by two arcs and Arc1-80 deg. and Arc2-280 deg. collimator angles for all the cases considered (i.e., leaf travel parallel to the spinal cord primary orientation). If one arc is used, only 80 deg. reached the objectives. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the role of collimation rotation for the vertebrae metastasis irradiation, with the leaf travel parallel to the spinal cord primary orientation to be better than other solutions. Thus, optimal choice of collimator angle increases the optimization freedom to shape a desired dose distribution.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the trade-off between vertebral column sparing and thecal-sac target coverage in craniospinal irradiation (CSI) of pediatric patients treated with passive-scattering (PS) and intensity modulated (IMPT) proton therapy. Methods: We selected 2 pediatric patients treated with PS CSI for medulloblastoma. Spinal irradiation was re-planned with IMPT. For all cases, we assumed prescription dose of 23.4 Gy(RBE), with the spinal canal receiving at least 95% of 23.4 Gy(RBE). PS planning was performed using the commercial system XiO. IMPT planning was done using the Astroid planning system. Beam arrangements consisted of (a) PS posterior-anterior (PA) field, PS-PA, (b) IMPT PAmore » field, IMPT-PA, and (c) two posterior oblique IMPT fields, IMPT2 (-35°, 35°). Dose distributions were re-calculated using TOPAS Monte Carlo, along with LET distributions, to investigate LET variations within the target and vertebra anatomy. Variable RBE-weighed dose distributions were also calculated based on a dose and LET-dependent biophysical model. Dosimetric data were compared among the plans for the target volume, spinal cord and adjacent critical organs (thecal-sac and cauda equina). Results: IMPT2 resulted in better sparing of the posterior vertebral column (entrance region posterior to thecal-sac), where planned dose was approximately 6–8Gy(RBE). For IMPT-PA and PS-PA the MC-calculated dose to the posterior vertebral column was, on average, 20Gy and 18Gy respectively. For IMPT2 higher mean-LET (5keV/µm/(g/cm3)) values were observed in anterior vertebral column (beyond the thecal-sac) relative to IMPT-PA and PS-PA, where mean-LET was 3.5keV/µm/(g/cm3) and 2.5keV/µm/(g/cm3) respectively. The higher LET region observed for both IMPT plans was in the distal end of treatment fields, where dose delivered was less 5Gy(RBE). Conclusion: The two-oblique proton beams IMPT2 best spared the spinal column, while reducing the dose to the posterior spinal column from 18–20 to 6–8 Gy(RBE). The best LET distribution was obtained with the PS-PA fields.« less
  • Purpose: At present, proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI) for growing children is delivered to the whole vertebral body (WVB) to avoid asymmetric growth. We aimed to demonstrate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of delivering vertebral body sparing (VBS) versus WVB CSI with passively scattered (PS) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in growing children treated for medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Five plans were generated for medulloblastoma patients, who had been previously treated with CSI PS proton radiation therapy: (1) single posteroanterior (PA) PS field covering the WVB (PS-PA-WVB); (2) single PA PS field that included only the thecal sac inmore » the target volume (PS-PA-VBS); (3) single PA IMPT field covering the WVB (IMPT-PA-WVB); (4) single PA IMPT field, target volume including thecal sac only (IMPT-PA-VBS); and (5) 2 posterior-oblique (−35°, +35°) IMPT fields, with the target volume including the thecal sac only (IMPT2F-VBS). For all cases, 23.4 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE]) was prescribed to 95% of the spinal canal. The dose, linear energy transfer, and variable-RBE-weighted dose distributions were calculated for all plans using the tool for particle simulation, version 2, Monte Carlo system. Results: IMPT VBS techniques efficiently spared the anterior vertebral bodies (AVBs), even when accounting for potential higher variable RBE predicted by linear energy transfer distributions. Assuming an RBE of 1.1, the V10 Gy(RBE) decreased from 100% for the WVB techniques to 59.5% to 76.8% for the cervical, 29.9% to 34.6% for the thoracic, and 20.6% to 25.1% for the lumbar AVBs, and the V20 Gy(RBE) decreased from 99.0% to 17.8% to 20.0% for the cervical, 7.2% to 7.6% for the thoracic, and 4.0% to 4.6% for the lumbar AVBs when IMPT VBS techniques were applied. The corresponding percentages for the PS VBS technique were higher. Conclusions: Advanced proton techniques can sufficiently reduce the dose to the vertebral body and allow for vertebral column growth for children with central nervous system tumors requiring CSI. This was true even when considering variable RBE values. A clinical trial is planned for VBS to the thoracic and lumbosacral spine in growing children.« less