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Title: SU-F-T-588: Asymmetries in the CyberKnife Iris 2 Collimator

Abstract

Purpose: The Iris 2 dodecahedral collimator in the CyberKnife unit can demonstrate visible asymmetry in the shaped radiation field, as seen on routine films. Specifically some edges of the collimator project longer than others. PDDs and output factors remain unaffected by this asymmetry. An in-house program was written to analyze the impact of this asymmetry on profiles. Methods: Two years of routine chromodynamic films were retrospectively analyzed using an in-house developed program. Films were obtained on a weekly basis in a plastic phantom on the vendor-provided mount. Profiles were obtained every degree. A dodecahedron was fitted to the 50% isodose line and the positions and sizes of the upper and lower hexagonal collimators were derived. The collimators’ profiles at every degree, symmetry and centering were calculated and trended over the months. Results: Asymmetries in the obtained profiles were apparent. The upper and lower collimators were off-centered (0.31 mm, p<10–8), they did not project the same field size at 80 cm (0.46 mm difference, p<10–31). Profiles as a function of angle demonstrate a periodicity, but short and long profiles are rarely 15° apart, but vary from 9° to 21°. In addition, a second, intermediate minimum is seen at every other shortmore » profile. A trend in the field size over time is noted and can be monitored to identify servicing needs. Conclusion: Despite its differences, the asymmetric Iris 2 collimator did not demonstrate large deviations in PDDs and output factors. Due to the asymmetry, the 15° apart profiles obtained at commissioning do not represent the true large and short blade profiles of the collimator. Averaging of the profiles in the commissioning process hides this difference.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Associates In Medical Physics, Lanham, MD and Virginia Hospital Center, Arlington VA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649163
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ASYMMETRY; COLLIMATORS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY

Citation Formats

Cernica, G, Ji, H, and McRae, D. SU-F-T-588: Asymmetries in the CyberKnife Iris 2 Collimator. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956773.
Cernica, G, Ji, H, & McRae, D. SU-F-T-588: Asymmetries in the CyberKnife Iris 2 Collimator. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956773.
Cernica, G, Ji, H, and McRae, D. Wed . "SU-F-T-588: Asymmetries in the CyberKnife Iris 2 Collimator". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956773.
@article{osti_22649163,
title = {SU-F-T-588: Asymmetries in the CyberKnife Iris 2 Collimator},
author = {Cernica, G and Ji, H and McRae, D},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The Iris 2 dodecahedral collimator in the CyberKnife unit can demonstrate visible asymmetry in the shaped radiation field, as seen on routine films. Specifically some edges of the collimator project longer than others. PDDs and output factors remain unaffected by this asymmetry. An in-house program was written to analyze the impact of this asymmetry on profiles. Methods: Two years of routine chromodynamic films were retrospectively analyzed using an in-house developed program. Films were obtained on a weekly basis in a plastic phantom on the vendor-provided mount. Profiles were obtained every degree. A dodecahedron was fitted to the 50% isodose line and the positions and sizes of the upper and lower hexagonal collimators were derived. The collimators’ profiles at every degree, symmetry and centering were calculated and trended over the months. Results: Asymmetries in the obtained profiles were apparent. The upper and lower collimators were off-centered (0.31 mm, p<10–8), they did not project the same field size at 80 cm (0.46 mm difference, p<10–31). Profiles as a function of angle demonstrate a periodicity, but short and long profiles are rarely 15° apart, but vary from 9° to 21°. In addition, a second, intermediate minimum is seen at every other short profile. A trend in the field size over time is noted and can be monitored to identify servicing needs. Conclusion: Despite its differences, the asymmetric Iris 2 collimator did not demonstrate large deviations in PDDs and output factors. Due to the asymmetry, the 15° apart profiles obtained at commissioning do not represent the true large and short blade profiles of the collimator. Averaging of the profiles in the commissioning process hides this difference.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956773},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: This work reports the results of the physics evaluation of a newly released InCise™2 Multileaf Collimator (MLC) installed in our institution. Methods: Beam property data was measured with unshielded diode and EBT2 films. The measurements included MLC leaf transmission, beam profiles, output factors and tissue-phantom ratios. MLC performance was evaluated for one month after commissioning. Weekly Garden Fence tests were performed for leaf / bank positioning in standard (A/P) and clinically relevant non-standard positions, before and after MLC driving exercises of 10+ minutes. Daily Picket Fence test and AQA test, End-to-End tests and dosimetric quality assurance were performed tomore » evaluate the overall system performance. Results: All measurements including beam energy, flatness and symmetry, were within manufacture specifications. Leaf transmission was 0.4% <0.5% specification. The values of output factors ranged from 0.825 (7.6 mm × 7.5 mm) to 1.026 (115.0 mm × 100.1 mm). Average beam penumbra at 10 cm depth ranged from 2.7mm/2.7mm(7.6 mm × 7.5 mm) to 6.0 mm/6.2mm(84.6 mm × 84.7 mm). Slight penumbra difference (<10% from average penumbra for fields >20 mm) was observed in the direction perpendicular to leaf motion due to the tilting of the leaf housing. Mean leaf position offsets was −0.08±0.07mm and −0.13 ± 0.08 for X1 and X2 leaf banks in 13 Garden Fence tests. No significant difference on average leaf positioning offsets was observed between different leaf orientations and before/after MLC driving exercises. Six End-to-End tests showed 0.43±0.23mm overall targeting accuracy. Picket-Fence and AQA showed stable performance of MLC during the test period. Dosimetric point dose measurements for test cases agreed with calculation within 3%. All film measurements on relative dose had Gamma (2%, 2mm) passing rate of >95%. Conclusion: The Incise™2 MLC for CyberKnife M6™ was proven to be accurate and reliable, and it is currently in clinical use. Stanford was one of the physics evaluation sites for the newly released InCise 2 MLC for Accuray Inc.« less
  • Purpose: To measure the output factors (OFs) of the small fields formed by the variable aperture collimator system (iris) of a CyberKnife (CK) robotic radiosurgery system, and determine the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for a microchamber and four diode detectors. Methods: OF measurements were performed using a PTW PinPoint 31014 microchamber, four diode detectors (PTW-60017, -60012, -60008, and the SunNuclear EDGE detector), TLD-100 microcubes, alanine dosimeters, EBT films, and polymer gels for the 5 mm, 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and 15 mm irismore » collimators at 650 mm, 800 mm, and 1000 mm source to detector distance (SDD). The alanine OF measurements were corrected for volume averaging effects using the 3D dose distributions registered in polymer gel dosimeters. k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for the PinPoint microchamber and the diode dosimeters were calculated through comparison against corresponding polymer gel, EBT, alanine, and TLD results. Results: Experimental OF results are presented for the array of dosimetric systems used. The PinPoint microchamber was found to underestimate small field OFs, and a k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factor ranging from 1.127 {+-} 0.022 (for the 5 mm iris collimator) to 1.004 {+-} 0.010 (for the 15 mm iris collimator) was determined at the reference SDD of 800 mm. The PinPoint k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factor was also found to increase with decreasing SDD; k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} values equal to 1.220 {+-} 0.028 and 1.077 {+-} 0.016 were obtained for the 5 mm iris collimator at 650 mm and 1000 mm SDD, respectively. On the contrary, diode detectors were found to overestimate small field OFs and a correction factor equal to 0.973 {+-} 0.006, 0.954 {+-} 0.006, 0.937 {+-} 0.007, and 0.964 {+-} 0.006 was measured for the PTW-60017, -60012, -60008 and the EDGE diode detectors, respectively, for the 5 mm iris collimator at 800 mm SDD. The corresponding correction factors for the 15 mm iris collimator were found equal to 0.997 {+-} 0.010, 0.994 {+-} 0.009, 0.988 {+-} 0.010, and 0.986 {+-} 0.010, respectively. No correlation of the diode k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors with SDD was observed. Conclusions: This work demonstrates an experimental procedure for the determination of the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors required to obtain small field OF results of increased accuracy.« less
  • Purpose: A novel CCD camera and conical scintillator based phantom that is capable of measuring the targeting and field size accuracy of a robotic radiosurgery system has been developed. This work investigates its application in measuring the field sizes and beam divergence of the CyberKnife variable aperture collimator (Iris). Methods: The phantom was placed on the treatment couch and the robot position was adjusted to obtain an anterior -posterior beam perpendicular to the cone’s central axis. The FWHM of the 12 Iris apertures (5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 50, and 60 mm) were measured frommore » the beam flux map on the conical scintillator surface as seen by the CCD camera. For each measurement 30 MU were delivered to the phantom at a dose rate of 1000 MU/min. The measurements were repeated at 4 SAD distances between 75 and 85 cm. These readings were used to project the aperture size as if the flux map on the scintillator were located 80 cm from the source (SSD). These projected FWHM beam diameters were then compared to the commissioning data. Results: A series of 12 beam divergence equations were obtained from the 4 sets of data using linear trend lines on Excel scatter plots. These equations were then used to project the FWHM measurements at 80 cm SSD. The average aperture accuracy for beams from 5 through 40 mm was 0.08 mm. The accuracy for the 50 and 60 mm beams were 0.33 and 0.58 mm when compared to film commissioning data. Conclusion: The experimental results for 10 apertures agree with the stated Iris accuracy of ±0.2 mm at 80 cm SAD. The results for the 50 and 60 mm aperture were repeatable and can serve as a reliable trend indicator of any deviations away from the commissioning values. Brett Nelson is President/CTO of Logos Systems.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the impact of custom-made build-up caps for a diode detector in robotic radiosurgery radiation fields with variable collimator (IRIS) for collimator scatter factor (Sc) calculation. Methods: An acrylic cap was custom-made to fit our SFD (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) diode detector. The cap has thickness of 5 cm, corresponding to a depth beyond electron contamination. IAEA phase space data was used for beam modeling and DOSRZnrc code was used to model the detector. The detector was positioned at 80 cm source-to-detector distance. Calculations were performed with the SFD, with and without the build-up cap, for clinical IRIS settingsmore » ranging from 7.5 to 60 mm. Results: The collimator scatter factors were calculated with and without 5 cm build-up cap. They were agreed within 3% difference except 15 mm cone. The Sc factor for 15 mm cone without buildup was 13.2% lower than that with buildup. Conclusion: Sc data is a critical component in advanced algorithms for treatment planning in order to calculate the dose accurately. After incorporating build-up cap, we discovered differences of up to 13.2 % in Sc factors in the SFD detector, when compared against in-air measurements without build-up caps.« less
  • Purpose: The InCise™ Multileaf Collimator (MLC) of CyberKnife M6™ System has been released recently. The purpose of this study was to explore the dosimetric characteristics of the new MLC. In particular, the penumbra characteristics of MLC fields at varying locations are evaluated. Methods: EBT3-based film measurements were performed with varying MLC fields ranging from 7.5 mm to 27.5 mm. Seventeen regions of interests (ROIs) were identified for irradiation. These are regions located at the central area (denoted as reference field), at the left/right edge areas of reference open field, at an intermediate location between central and edge area. Single beammore » treatment plans were designed by using the MultiPlan and was delivered using the Blue Phantom. Gafchromic films were irradiated at 1.5 cm depth in the Blue Phantom and analyzed using the Film Pro software. Variation of maximum dose, penumbra of MLC-defined fields, and symmetry/flatness were calculated as a function of locations of MLC fields. Results: The InCise™ MLC System showed relatively consistent dose distribution and penumbra size with varying locations of MLC fields. The measured maximum dose varied within 5 % at different locations compared to that at the central location and agreed with the calculated data well within 2%. The measured penumbrae were in the range of 2.9 mm and 3.7 mm and were relatively consistent regardless of locations. However, dose profiles in the out-of-field and in-field regions varied with locations and field sizes. Strong variation was seen for all fields located at 55 mm away from the central field. The MLC leakage map showed that the leakage is dependent on position. Conclusion: The size of penumbra and normalized maximum dose for MLC-defined fields were consistent in different regions of MLC. However, dose profiles in the out-field region varied with locations and field sizes.« less