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Title: SU-F-T-584: Investigating Correction Methods for Ion Recombination Effects in OCTAVIUS 1000 SRS Measurements

Abstract

Purpose: PTW’s Octavius 1000 SRS array performs IMRT QA measurements with liquid filled ionization chambers (LICs). Collection efficiencies of LICs have been shown to change during IMRT delivery as a function of LINAC pulse frequency and pulse dose, which affects QA results. In this study, two methods were developed to correct changes in collection efficiencies during IMRT QA measurements, and the effects of these corrections on QA pass rates were compared. Methods: For the first correction, Matlab software was developed that calculates pulse frequency and pulse dose for each detector, using measurement and DICOM RT Plan files. Pulse information is converted to collection efficiency and measurements are corrected by multiplying detector dose by ratios of calibration to measured collection efficiencies. For the second correction, MU/min in daily 1000 SRS calibration was chosen to match average MU/min of the VMAT plan. Usefulness of derived corrections were evaluated using 6MV and 10FFF SBRT RapidArc plans delivered to the OCTAVIUS 4D system using a TrueBeam equipped with an HD- MLC. Effects of the two corrections on QA results were examined by performing 3D gamma analysis comparing predicted to measured dose, with and without corrections. Results: After complex Matlab corrections, average 3D gamma passmore » rates improved by [0.07%,0.40%,1.17%] for 6MV and [0.29%,1.40%,4.57%] for 10FFF using [3%/3mm,2%/2mm,1%/1mm] criteria. Maximum changes in gamma pass rates were [0.43%,1.63%,3.05%] for 6MV and [1.00%,4.80%,11.2%] for 10FFF using [3%/3mm,2%/2mm,1%/1mm] criteria. On average, pass rates of simple daily calibration corrections were within 1% of complex Matlab corrections. Conclusion: Ion recombination effects can potentially be clinically significant for OCTAVIUS 1000 SRS measurements, especially for higher pulse dose unflattened beams when using tighter gamma tolerances. Matching daily 1000 SRS calibration MU/min to average planned MU/min is a simple correction that greatly reduces ion recombination effects, improving measurements accuracy and gamma pass rates. This work was supported by PTW.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)
  4. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649159
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; CALIBRATION; COMPUTER CODES; CORRECTIONS; EFFICIENCY; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; LIQUID IONIZATION CHAMBERS; PULSES; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; RATS; RECOMBINATION

Citation Formats

Knill, C, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, Snyder, M, Rakowski, J, J, Burmeister, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI, Zhuang, L, and Matuszak, M. SU-F-T-584: Investigating Correction Methods for Ion Recombination Effects in OCTAVIUS 1000 SRS Measurements. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956769.
Knill, C, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, Snyder, M, Rakowski, J, J, Burmeister, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI, Zhuang, L, & Matuszak, M. SU-F-T-584: Investigating Correction Methods for Ion Recombination Effects in OCTAVIUS 1000 SRS Measurements. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956769.
Knill, C, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, Snyder, M, Rakowski, J, J, Burmeister, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI, Zhuang, L, and Matuszak, M. 2016. "SU-F-T-584: Investigating Correction Methods for Ion Recombination Effects in OCTAVIUS 1000 SRS Measurements". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956769.
@article{osti_22649159,
title = {SU-F-T-584: Investigating Correction Methods for Ion Recombination Effects in OCTAVIUS 1000 SRS Measurements},
author = {Knill, C and Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI and Snyder, M and Rakowski, J and J, Burmeister and Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI and Zhuang, L and Matuszak, M},
abstractNote = {Purpose: PTW’s Octavius 1000 SRS array performs IMRT QA measurements with liquid filled ionization chambers (LICs). Collection efficiencies of LICs have been shown to change during IMRT delivery as a function of LINAC pulse frequency and pulse dose, which affects QA results. In this study, two methods were developed to correct changes in collection efficiencies during IMRT QA measurements, and the effects of these corrections on QA pass rates were compared. Methods: For the first correction, Matlab software was developed that calculates pulse frequency and pulse dose for each detector, using measurement and DICOM RT Plan files. Pulse information is converted to collection efficiency and measurements are corrected by multiplying detector dose by ratios of calibration to measured collection efficiencies. For the second correction, MU/min in daily 1000 SRS calibration was chosen to match average MU/min of the VMAT plan. Usefulness of derived corrections were evaluated using 6MV and 10FFF SBRT RapidArc plans delivered to the OCTAVIUS 4D system using a TrueBeam equipped with an HD- MLC. Effects of the two corrections on QA results were examined by performing 3D gamma analysis comparing predicted to measured dose, with and without corrections. Results: After complex Matlab corrections, average 3D gamma pass rates improved by [0.07%,0.40%,1.17%] for 6MV and [0.29%,1.40%,4.57%] for 10FFF using [3%/3mm,2%/2mm,1%/1mm] criteria. Maximum changes in gamma pass rates were [0.43%,1.63%,3.05%] for 6MV and [1.00%,4.80%,11.2%] for 10FFF using [3%/3mm,2%/2mm,1%/1mm] criteria. On average, pass rates of simple daily calibration corrections were within 1% of complex Matlab corrections. Conclusion: Ion recombination effects can potentially be clinically significant for OCTAVIUS 1000 SRS measurements, especially for higher pulse dose unflattened beams when using tighter gamma tolerances. Matching daily 1000 SRS calibration MU/min to average planned MU/min is a simple correction that greatly reduces ion recombination effects, improving measurements accuracy and gamma pass rates. This work was supported by PTW.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956769},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: PTW’s Octavius 1000 SRS array performs IMRT quality assurance (QA) measurements with liquid-filled ionization chambers (LICs) to allow closer detector spacing and higher resolution, compared to air-filled QA devices. However, reduced ion mobility in LICs relative to air leads to increased ion recombination effects and reduced collection efficiencies that are dependent on Linac pulse frequency and pulse dose. These pulse parameters are variable during an IMRT delivery, which affects QA results. In this study, (1) 1000 SRS collection efficiencies were measured as a function of pulse frequency and pulse dose, (2) two methods were developed to correct changes inmore » collection efficiencies during IMRT QA measurements, and the effects of these corrections on QA pass rates were compared. Methods: To obtain collection efficiencies, the OCTAVIUS 1000 SRS was used to measure open fields of varying pulse frequency, pulse dose, and beam energy with results normalized to air-filled chamber measurements. Changes in ratios of 1000 SRS to chamber measured dose were attributed to changing collection efficiencies, which were then correlated to pulse parameters using regression analysis. The usefulness of the derived corrections was then evaluated using 6 MV and 10FFF SBRT RapidArc plans delivered to the OCTAVIUS 4D system using a TrueBeam (Varian Medical Systems) linear accelerator equipped with a high definition multileaf collimator. For the first correction, MATLAB software was developed that calculates pulse frequency and pulse dose for each detector, using measurement and DICOM RT Plan files. Pulse information is converted to collection efficiency, and measurements are corrected by multiplying detector dose by ratios of calibration to measured collection efficiencies. For the second correction the MU/min in the daily 1000 SRS calibration was chosen to match the average MU/min of the volumetric modulated arc therapy plan. Effects of the two corrections on QA results were examined by performing 3D gamma analysis comparing predicted to measured dose, with and without corrections. Results: Collection efficiencies correlated linearly to pulse dose, while correlations with pulse frequency were less defined, generally increasing as pulse frequency decreased. After complex MATLAB corrections, average 3D gamma pass rates improved by [0.07%,0.40%,1.17%] for 6 MV and [0.29%,1.40%,4.57%] for 10FFF using [3%/3 mm,2%/2 mm,1%/1 mm] criteria. Maximum changes in gamma pass rates were [0.43%,1.63%,3.05%] for 6 MV and [1.00%,4.80%,11.2%] for 10FFF using [3%/3 mm,2%/2 mm,1%/1 mm] criteria. On average, pass rates of simple daily calibration corrections were within 1% of complex MATLAB corrections. Conclusions: OCTAVIUS 1000 SRS ion recombination effects have little effect on 6 MV measurements. However, the effect could potentially be clinically significant for higher pulse dose unflattened beams when using tighter gamma tolerances, especially when small aperture sizes are used, as is common for SRS/SBRT. In addition, ion recombination effects are strongly correlated to changing MU/min, therefore MU/min used in daily 1000 SRS calibrations should be matched to the expected average MU/min of the IMRT plan.« less
  • Purpose: The aim of this work was to characterize the clinical correctness of FFF prostate treatment VMAT plans based on analysis of DVHs reconstructed from pre-verification 2D-arrays measurements. Methods: The new 2D ion chamber array 1500 with rotational phantom cylindrical Octavius 4D and Verisoft 6.1 software with DVH option (PTW, Freiburg) were used to determine the clinical usefulness of the treatment plans. Ten patients treated with VMAT high-fractionated (2 fraction x 7,5 Gy) FFF prostate plans (TrueBeam, Varian) were analyzed using the 3D gamma analysis by local dose method with a 5% threshold for various tolerance parameters DTA [mm] andmore » DD [%] were 1%/1, 2%/2, 3%/3. Additional, based on the measurements of irradiation dose distributions and patients’ CT scans with contoured structures of organs, the DVHs were reconstructed using a software. The obtained DVHs were compared to planned dose distributions and the deviations were analysed with parameters: for CTV D50, D98, D2, and D25, D50, Dmax for OARs — rectum, bladder and left/right femoral heads. Results: The analyzed treatment plans passed gamma criteria (3/3%; 95%), the results obtained were as follow: mean value and standard deviation of gamma score for criteria (DTA[mm]/DD[%]): 1/1% (L53.3±3.2); 2/2% (L87.0±2.2); 3/3% (L97.5±0.9). In the DVH analysis, the highest differences were observed for OARs (especially for bladder): the mean percentage differences values for rectum, bladder and left/right femoral heads were: D25 (1.67; 6.83)%, D50 (0.18; 7.18; 1.53; 0.30)%, Dmax (−0.84; −1.64; 0.37; −4.63)%, respectively. For the CTV mean relative deviations for proper parameters were in good agreement with TPS: D98 (0.95±2.21)%, D50 (1.93±0.67)%, D2 (1.76±0.76)%. Conclusion: The gamma method is recommended tool for pre-verification analysis of correctness of treatment plans. Moreover, the scrutiny checking with reconstructed DVH gives additional, clinical information about quality of plan, especially about coverage of CTV and sparing of health tissues.« less
  • Measurements of rotation using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy can be affected by the energy dependence of the charge exchange cross section. On DIII-D, the associated correction to the rotation can exceed 100 km/s at high temperatures. In reactor-relevant low rotation conditions, the correction can be several times larger than the actual plasma rotation and therefore must be carefully validated. New chords have been added to the DIII-D CER diagnostic to view the counter-neutral-beam line. The addition of these views allows determination of the toroidal rotation without depending on detailed atomic physics calculations, while also allowing experimental characterization of the atomicmore » physics. A database of rotation comparisons from the two views shows that the calculated cross-section correction can adequately describe the measurements, although there is a tendency for 'overcorrection'. In cases where accuracy better than about 15% is desired, relying on calculation of the cross-section correction may be insufficient.« less
  • Diffuse irradiance, G{sub d}, is an important variable in solar resource assessment. The diffuse irradiance can be worked out from global, G, and direct, G{sub b}, irradiance measurements, but this method involves the use of relatively expensive tracking mechanisms. Alternatively, a widely accepted technique uses a pyranometer with a shadowband. Because the shadowband screens the sensor from part of the diffuse radiation coming in from the sky, a correction must be made to the measurements. However, because of the anisotropy of diffuse radiation it is difficult to compute an exact theoretical correction. In this study we use two data setsmore » registered in two locations in Spain. The first one consists in coincident hourly values of global, direct, and diffuse irradiance; the latter by means of shadowband. The other data set includes the same variables but as 5-minute values. Our goal is to study the necessary correction factor for diffuse irradiance measurements obtained by means of shadowband. After testing several well-known correction methods, we have developed two different correction models, using two-thirds of the hourly data set, while the remaining one-third and the whole 5-minute data set have been used for validation purposes. The last validation test suggests that our anisotropic models provide reliable corrections for conditions different than the ones where they have been developed. 14 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.« less