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Title: SU-F-T-565: Assessment of Dosimetric Accuracy for a 3D Gel-Based Dosimetry Service

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the 3D dosimetric accuracy when using a mail-in service for square and stereotactic fields in a clinical environment. Methods: The 3D dosimetry mail-in service (3DDaaS), offered by Modus QA (London, ON), was used to measure dose distributions from a 6 MV beam of a Varian Clinac. Plastic jars filled with radiosensitive ClearView™ gel were received, CT scanned (for registration and density information), irradiated, and then mailed back to the manufacturer for optical CT readout. Three square field irradiations (2×2, 4×4, and 10×10 cm{sup 2}) were performed with jars immobilized in a water tank, and a composite small-field stereotactic delivery was performed using an in-air holder. Dosimetric properties of the gel were quantified within the 25–50 Gy dose range using 3D optical attenuation (OA) distributions provided by the manufacturer. OA was normalized to 100% at the position of isocenter, which received 40Gy. Percentage depth dose, profiles, and 3D gamma distributions (3%/1mm criteria) were calculated to quantify feasibility for relative dosimetry. Results: Mean CT-measured density in the central (3×3×3) cm{sup 3} gel region was 40 ± 3 HU, indicating good homogeneity and near-water-equivalence. Measured and calculated central axis doses agreed to within ±3% in the 25–50 Gy dose range.more » For the square field irradiations, dose profiles agreed to within 1mm. Gamma analysis of the composite irradiation yielded 99.8%, 91.4%, and 79.1% passing rates for regions receiving at least 10, 5, and 2 Gy, respectively, indicating feasibility for use in high-dose regions. Absolute response varied by up to 16% between jars, indicating limitations for absolute dosimetry under the mail-in conditions. Conclusion: 3DDaaS is a novel near-water-equivalent dosimetry system accurate to within 3% dose and 1mm 3D spatial resolution, and is straightforward to use in a clinical setting. Future investigations are warranted to improve dosimeter response in low-dose regions. The authors would like to thank ModusQA (London, ON) for providing the gels and optical readouts used this work. This work was partially funded by NIH P01CA059827.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. University Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649140
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; DOSIMETRY; GELS; IRRADIATION; READOUT SYSTEMS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION

Citation Formats

Rosen, B, Lam, K, and Moran, J. SU-F-T-565: Assessment of Dosimetric Accuracy for a 3D Gel-Based Dosimetry Service. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956750.
Rosen, B, Lam, K, & Moran, J. SU-F-T-565: Assessment of Dosimetric Accuracy for a 3D Gel-Based Dosimetry Service. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956750.
Rosen, B, Lam, K, and Moran, J. 2016. "SU-F-T-565: Assessment of Dosimetric Accuracy for a 3D Gel-Based Dosimetry Service". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956750.
@article{osti_22649140,
title = {SU-F-T-565: Assessment of Dosimetric Accuracy for a 3D Gel-Based Dosimetry Service},
author = {Rosen, B and Lam, K and Moran, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To assess the 3D dosimetric accuracy when using a mail-in service for square and stereotactic fields in a clinical environment. Methods: The 3D dosimetry mail-in service (3DDaaS), offered by Modus QA (London, ON), was used to measure dose distributions from a 6 MV beam of a Varian Clinac. Plastic jars filled with radiosensitive ClearView™ gel were received, CT scanned (for registration and density information), irradiated, and then mailed back to the manufacturer for optical CT readout. Three square field irradiations (2×2, 4×4, and 10×10 cm{sup 2}) were performed with jars immobilized in a water tank, and a composite small-field stereotactic delivery was performed using an in-air holder. Dosimetric properties of the gel were quantified within the 25–50 Gy dose range using 3D optical attenuation (OA) distributions provided by the manufacturer. OA was normalized to 100% at the position of isocenter, which received 40Gy. Percentage depth dose, profiles, and 3D gamma distributions (3%/1mm criteria) were calculated to quantify feasibility for relative dosimetry. Results: Mean CT-measured density in the central (3×3×3) cm{sup 3} gel region was 40 ± 3 HU, indicating good homogeneity and near-water-equivalence. Measured and calculated central axis doses agreed to within ±3% in the 25–50 Gy dose range. For the square field irradiations, dose profiles agreed to within 1mm. Gamma analysis of the composite irradiation yielded 99.8%, 91.4%, and 79.1% passing rates for regions receiving at least 10, 5, and 2 Gy, respectively, indicating feasibility for use in high-dose regions. Absolute response varied by up to 16% between jars, indicating limitations for absolute dosimetry under the mail-in conditions. Conclusion: 3DDaaS is a novel near-water-equivalent dosimetry system accurate to within 3% dose and 1mm 3D spatial resolution, and is straightforward to use in a clinical setting. Future investigations are warranted to improve dosimeter response in low-dose regions. The authors would like to thank ModusQA (London, ON) for providing the gels and optical readouts used this work. This work was partially funded by NIH P01CA059827.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956750},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: SRS/SBRT combines hypofractionation with excellent dose distributions. However, extremely steep gradients across the target along with dose escalation, if not administered accurately, may lead to serious complications, recurrences, or even fatalities. Existing commercial QA products either lack adequate spatial resolution or the 3D aspect. By contrast, the new CrystalBall™ mailed high-resolution 3D dosimetry service removes the above limitations while reducing the overall workload on medical physics staff. The exposed dosimeters, which change optical density in proportion to local dose, are sent back to the manufacturer (MGS Research Inc., Madison, CT) for sub-millimeter-resolution laser-CT scanning and QA data analysis. QAmore » report is returned electronically within 24 hours. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose calibration accuracy in this system. Methods: Two spherical CrystalBall™ polymer gel dosimeters from the same batch, 166 mm diameter, with embedded 3D image registration markers, were mounted in a special phantom designed for reproducible positioning. For full end to end testing, the optical guidance array was mounted onto the phantom and a CT was taken. Two separate Rapid Arc SRS plans were designed. Varian Medical Systems optical guidance system was used to position the phantom and the SRS treatment plans were delivered to the two spheres on Varian's Trilogy Accelerator. Exposed dosimeters were mailed back to the manufacturer for laser CT scanning and analysis. Results: For each plan, 3D gamma passing rate was 100% for 2%/2mm distance-to-agreement criteria above 50% isodose level. The two calibration curves, generated using volumetric dose and optical density data, showed excellent mutual agreement (max difference 2.2%, median difference 0.75%). Conclusion: The clinical utility of new CrystalBall™ mailed QA service for SRS/SBRT and high accuracy of dose calibration have been validated. The workflow associated with the use of the CrystalBall™ in clinical setting was found to be minimal. The presenting author is the founder of and has an ownership in MGS Research Inc which manufactures the CrystalBall system for 3D dosimetry.« less
  • Purpose: The aim of this work is to validate a deterministic radiation transport based treatment planning system (TPS) for single {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source dosimetry in homogeneous water geometries. Methods: TPS results were obtained using the deterministic radiation transport option of a BRACHYVISION v. 8.8 system for three characteristic source designs (VS2000, GMPlus HDR, and GMPlus PDR) with each source either centered in a 15 cm radius spherical water phantom, or positioned at varying distance away from the phantom center. Corresponding MC simulations were performed using the MCNPX code v.2.5.0 and source geometry models prepared using information provided by themore » manufacturers. Results: Comparison in terms of the AAPM TG-43 dosimetric formalism quantities, as well as dose rate distributions per unit air kerma strength with a spatial resolution of 0.1 cm, yielded close agreement between TPS and MC results for the sources centered in the phantom. Besides some regions close to the source longitudinal axes where discrepancies could be characterized as systematic, overall agreement for all three sources studied is comparable to the statistical (type A) uncertainty of MC simulations (1% at the majority of points in the geometry increasing to 2%-3% at points lying both away from the source center and close to the source longitudinal axis). A corresponding good agreement was also found between TPS and MC results for the sources positioned away from the phantom center. Conclusions: Results of this work attest the capability of the TPS to accurately account for the scatter conditions regardless of the size or shape of a given geometry of dosimetric interest, and the position of a source within it. This is important since, as shown in the literature and summarized also in this work, these factors could introduce a significant dosimetric effect that is currently ignored in clinical treatment planning. It is concluded that the implementation of the deterministic radiation transport option of the BRACHYVISION v. 8.8 system for {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy dosimetry in homogeneous water geometries yields results of comparable accuracy to the golden standard of Monte Carlo simulation, in clinically viable calculation times.« less
  • Purpose: The aim of this work is the dosimetric validation of a deterministic radiation transport based treatment planning system (BRACHYVISION v. 8.8, referred to as TPS in the following) for multiple {sup 192}Ir source dwell position brachytherapy applications employing a shielded applicator in homogeneous water geometries. Methods: TPS calculations for an irradiation plan employing seven VS2000 {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) source dwell positions and a partially shielded applicator (GM11004380) were compared to corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results, as well as experimental results obtained using the VIP polymer gel-magnetic resonance imaging three-dimensional dosimetry method with a custom mademore » phantom. Results: TPS and MC dose distributions were found in agreement which is mainly within {+-}2%. Considerable differences between TPS and MC results (greater than 2%) were observed at points in the penumbra of the shields (i.e., close to the edges of the ''shielded'' segment of the geometries). These differences were experimentally verified and therefore attributed to the TPS. Apart from these regions, experimental and TPS dose distributions were found in agreement within 2 mm distance to agreement and 5% dose difference criteria. As shown in this work, these results mark a significant improvement relative to dosimetry algorithms that disregard the presence of the shielded applicator since the use of the latter leads to dosimetry errors on the order of 20%-30% at the edge of the ''unshielded'' segment of the geometry and even 2%-6% at points corresponding to the potential location of the target volume in clinical applications using the applicator (points in the unshielded segment at short distances from the applicator). Conclusions: Results of this work attest the capability of the TPS to accurately account for the scatter conditions and the increased attenuation involved in HDR brachytherapy applications employing multiple source dwell positions and partially shielded applicators.« less
  • Purpose: Compensator-based IMRT coupled with the high dose rate flattening filter free (FFF) beams offers an intriguing possibility of delivering an intensity modulated radiation field in just a few seconds. As a first step, the authors evaluate the dosimetric accuracy of the treatment planning system (TPS) FFF beam model with compensators. Methods: A 6 MV FFF beam from a TrueBeam accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto CA) was modeled in PINNACLE TPS (v. 9.0, Philips Radiation Oncology, Fitchburg WI). Flat brass slabs from 0.3 to 7 cm thick and an 18 deg. brass wedge were used to adjust the beammore » model. A 2D (MAPCHECK) and 3D (ARCCHECK) diode arrays (Sun Nuclear Corp, Melbourne FL), were investigated for use with the compensator FFF beams. Corrections for diode sensitivity caused by the spectral changes in the beam were introduced. Four compensator plans based on the AAPM TG-119 report were developed. A composite ion chamber measurement, beam by beam MAPCHECK measurements, and a composite ARCCHECK measurement were performed. The array results were analyzed with the same thresholds as in TG-119 report--3%/3 mm with global dose normalization--as well as with the more stringent combinations of the gamma analysis criteria. Results: The FFF beam shows a greater variation of the effective attenuation coefficient with brass thickness due to the prevalence of the low energy photons compared to the conventional 6X beam. As a result, a compromise had to be made while trying to achieve dose agreement for a combination of field sizes, brass thicknesses, and measurement depths ({>=}5 cm in water). An agreement of measured and calculated dose to within 1% was observed for brass thicknesses up to 2 cm. For the 3 cm slab, an error of up to 2.8% was noted for the field sizes above 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, and up to 3.8% for the 5 x 5 cm{sup 2} field. Both diode arrays exhibit a substantial sensitivity drop as the compensator thickness increases, reaching 10% for a 7 cm brass slab. A simple correction based on the brass thickness along the ray was introduced to counteract this effect. Pooled for five profiles, the average ratio of uncorrected and corrected MAPCHECK to ion chamber readings are 0.966 and 1.008, respectively. With the proper correction, all MAPCHECK measurement to calculation comparisons exhibit 100%{gamma}(3%/3 mm) passing rates with global dose-error normalization. For the TG-119-type plans, the average {gamma}(2%/2 mm) passing rate with local normalization is 94% (range 87.8%-98.3%). The lower ARCCHECK{gamma}-analysis passing rates (corrected for diode sensitivity) are predictable based on the observed PDD discrepancies. However, with the 3%/3 mm thresholds and global normalization, the average {gamma}-analysis passing rate is 96.4% (range 89.9%-100%). Conclusions: MAPCHECK analysis demonstrates high passing rates with the stringent {gamma}(2%/2 mm) and local normalization criteria combination. The geometry of the ARCCHECK array creates a stress test for the FFF TPS model because of the shallow depth of the entrance diodes and large air cavity. Hence, the ARCCHECK{gamma}-analysis passing rates are lower than with the MAPCHECK, while still on par with TG-119.« less
  • Purpose: To compare TG43-based and Acuros deterministic radiation transport-based calculations of the BrachyVision treatment planning system (TPS) with corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results in heterogeneous patient geometries, in order to validate Acuros and quantify the accuracy improvement it marks relative to TG43. Methods: Dosimetric comparisons in the form of isodose lines, percentage dose difference maps, and dose volume histogram results were performed for two voxelized mathematical models resembling an esophageal and a breast brachytherapy patient, as well as an actual breast brachytherapy patient model. The mathematical models were converted to digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) image seriesmore » for input to the TPS. The MCNP5 v.1.40 general-purpose simulation code input files for each model were prepared using information derived from the corresponding DICOM RT exports from the TPS. Results: Comparisons of MC and TG43 results in all models showed significant differences, as reported previously in the literature and expected from the inability of the TG43 based algorithm to account for heterogeneities and model specific scatter conditions. A close agreement was observed between MC and Acuros results in all models except for a limited number of points that lay in the penumbra of perfectly shaped structures in the esophageal model, or at distances very close to the catheters in all models. Conclusions: Acuros marks a significant dosimetry improvement relative to TG43. The assessment of the clinical significance of this accuracy improvement requires further work. Mathematical patient equivalent models and models prepared from actual patient CT series are useful complementary tools in the methodology outlined in this series of works for the benchmarking of any advanced dose calculation algorithm beyond TG43.« less