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Title: SU-F-T-563: Delivered Dose Reconstruction of Moving Targets for Gated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

Abstract

Purpose: Actual delivered dose of moving tumors treated with gated volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) may significantly differ from the planned dose assuming static target. In this study, we developed a method which reconstructs actual delivered dose distribution of moving target by taking into account both tumor motion and dynamic beam delivery of gated VMAT, and applied to abdominal tumors. Methods: Fifteen dual-arc VMAT plans (Eclipse, Varian Medical Systems) for 5 lung, 5 pancreatic, and 5 liver cancer patients treated with gated VMAT stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were studied. For reconstruction of the delivered dose distribution, we divided each original arc beam into control-point-wise sub-beams, and applied beam isocenter shifting to each sub-beam to reflect the tumor motion. The tumor positions as a function of beam delivery were estimated by synchronizing the beam delivery with the respiratory signal which acquired during treatment. For this purpose, an in-house program (MATLAB, Mathworks) was developed to convert the original DICOM plan data into motion-involved treatment plan. The motion-involved DICOM plan was imported into Eclipse for dose calculation. The reconstructed delivered dose was compared to the plan dose using the dose coverage of gross tumor volume (GTV) and dose distribution of organs at risk (OAR).more » Results: The mean GTV dose coverage difference between the reconstructed delivered dose and the plan dose was 0.2 % in lung and pancreas cases, and no difference in liver cases. Mean D1000cc of ipsilateral lungs was reduced (0.8 ± 1.4cGy). Conclusion: We successfully developed a method of delivered dose reconstruction taking into account both respiratory tumor motion and dynamic beam delivery, and applied it to abdominal tumors treated with gated VAMT. No significant deterioration of delivered dose distribution indicates that interplay effect would be minimal even in the case of gated SBRT. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No. 2015038710)« less

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Department of Nuclear Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)
  2. Deparment of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649138
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; DELIVERY; LUNGS; NEOPLASMS; PANCREAS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Chung, H, Cho, S, Jeong, C, and Cho, B. SU-F-T-563: Delivered Dose Reconstruction of Moving Targets for Gated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956748.
Chung, H, Cho, S, Jeong, C, & Cho, B. SU-F-T-563: Delivered Dose Reconstruction of Moving Targets for Gated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956748.
Chung, H, Cho, S, Jeong, C, and Cho, B. 2016. "SU-F-T-563: Delivered Dose Reconstruction of Moving Targets for Gated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956748.
@article{osti_22649138,
title = {SU-F-T-563: Delivered Dose Reconstruction of Moving Targets for Gated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)},
author = {Chung, H and Cho, S and Jeong, C and Cho, B},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Actual delivered dose of moving tumors treated with gated volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) may significantly differ from the planned dose assuming static target. In this study, we developed a method which reconstructs actual delivered dose distribution of moving target by taking into account both tumor motion and dynamic beam delivery of gated VMAT, and applied to abdominal tumors. Methods: Fifteen dual-arc VMAT plans (Eclipse, Varian Medical Systems) for 5 lung, 5 pancreatic, and 5 liver cancer patients treated with gated VMAT stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were studied. For reconstruction of the delivered dose distribution, we divided each original arc beam into control-point-wise sub-beams, and applied beam isocenter shifting to each sub-beam to reflect the tumor motion. The tumor positions as a function of beam delivery were estimated by synchronizing the beam delivery with the respiratory signal which acquired during treatment. For this purpose, an in-house program (MATLAB, Mathworks) was developed to convert the original DICOM plan data into motion-involved treatment plan. The motion-involved DICOM plan was imported into Eclipse for dose calculation. The reconstructed delivered dose was compared to the plan dose using the dose coverage of gross tumor volume (GTV) and dose distribution of organs at risk (OAR). Results: The mean GTV dose coverage difference between the reconstructed delivered dose and the plan dose was 0.2 % in lung and pancreas cases, and no difference in liver cases. Mean D1000cc of ipsilateral lungs was reduced (0.8 ± 1.4cGy). Conclusion: We successfully developed a method of delivered dose reconstruction taking into account both respiratory tumor motion and dynamic beam delivery, and applied it to abdominal tumors treated with gated VAMT. No significant deterioration of delivered dose distribution indicates that interplay effect would be minimal even in the case of gated SBRT. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No. 2015038710)},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956748},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 receivedmore » a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality.« less
  • Purpose: To compare the plan quality and performance of Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) Treatment plan between Seven field (7F) and Nine field(9F) Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies and Single Arc (SA) and Dual Arc (DA) Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy( VMAT). Methods: Retrospective planning study of 16 patients treated in Elekta Synergy Platform (mlci2) by 9F-IMRT were replanned with 7F-IMRT, Single Arc VMAT and Dual Arc VMAT using CMS, Monaco Treatment Planning System (TPS) with Monte Carlo simulation. Target delineation done as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Protocols (RTOG 0225&0615). Dose Prescribed as 70Gy to Planning Target Volumes (PTV70) and 61Gy to PTV61 inmore » 33 fraction as a SIB technique. Conformity Index(CI), Homogeneity Index(HI) were used as analysis parameter for Target Volumes as well as Mean dose and Max dose for Organ at Risk(OAR,s).Treatment Delivery Time(min), Monitor unit per fraction (MU/fraction), Patient specific quality assurance were also analysed. Results: A Poor dose coverage and Conformity index (CI) was observed in PTV70 by 7F-IMRT among other techniques. SA-VMAT achieved poor dose coverage in PTV61. No statistical significance difference observed in OAR,s except Spinal cord (P= 0.03) and Right optic nerve (P=0.03). DA-VMAT achieved superior target coverage, higher CI (P =0.02) and Better HI (P=0.03) for PTV70 other techniques (7F-IMRT/9F-IMRT/SA-VMAT). A better dose spare for Parotid glands and spinal cord were seen in DA-VMAT. The average treatment delivery time were 5.82mins, 6.72mins, 3.24mins, 4.3mins for 7F-IMRT, 9F-IMRT, SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT respectively. Significance difference Observed in MU/fr (P <0.001) and Patient quality assurance pass rate were >95% (Gamma analysis (Γ3mm, 3%). Conclusion: DA-VAMT showed better target dose coverage and achieved better or equal performance in sparing OARs among other techniques. SA-VMAT offered least Treatment Time than other techniques but achieved poor target coverage. DA-VMAT offered shorter delivery time than 7F-IMRT and 9F-IMRT without compromising the plan quality.« less
  • With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as wellmore » as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose escalation and combining with radiosensitizing chemotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: This study evaluates the dosimetric differences using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients previously treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy IMRT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in early stage lung cancer. Methods: We evaluated 9 consecutive medically inoperable lung cancer patients at the start of the SBRT program who were treated with IMRT from November 2010 to October 2011. These patients were treated using 6 MV energy. The 9 cases were then re-planned with VMAT performed with arc therapy using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) energy with the same organs at risk (OARS) constraints. Data collected formore » the treatment plans included target coverage, beam on time, dose to OARS and gamma pass rate. Results: Five patients were T1N0 and four patients were T2N0 with all tumors less than 5 cm. The average GTV was 13.02 cm3 (0.83–40.87) and average PTV was 44.65 cm3 (14.06–118.08). The IMRT plans had a mean of 7.2 angles (6–9) and 5.4 minutes (3.6–11.1) per plan. The VMAT plans had a mean of 2.8 arcs (2–3) and 4.0 minutes (2.2–6.0) per plan. VMAT had slightly more target coverage than IMRT with average increase in D95 of 2.68% (1.24–5.73) and D99 of 3.65% (0.88–8.77). VMAT produced lower doses to all OARs. The largest reductions were in maximum doses to the spinal cord with an average reduction of 24.1%, esophagus with an average reduction of 22.1%, and lung with an average reduction in the V20 of 16.3% The mean gamma pass rate was 99.8% (99.2–100) at 3 mm and 3% for VMAT with comparable values for IMRT. Conclusion: These findings suggest that using VMAT for SBRT in early stage lung cancer is superior to IMRT in terms of dose coverage, OAR dose and a lower treatment delivery time with a similar gamma pass rate.« less
  • Purpose: To introduce a hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy/intensity modulated radiation therapy (VMAT/IMRT) optimization strategy called FusionArc that combines the delivery efficiency of single-arc VMAT with the potentially desirable intensity modulation possible with IMRT.Methods: A beamlet-based inverse planning system was enhanced to combine the advantages of VMAT and IMRT into one comprehensive technique. In the hybrid strategy, baseline single-arc VMAT plans are optimized and then the current cost function gradients with respect to the beamlets are used to define a metric for predicting which beam angles would benefit from further intensity modulation. Beams with the highest metric values (called themore » gradient factor) are converted from VMAT apertures to IMRT fluence, and the optimization proceeds with the mixed variable set until convergence or until additional beams are selected for conversion. One phantom and two clinical cases were used to validate the gradient factor and characterize the FusionArc strategy. Comparisons were made between standard IMRT, single-arc VMAT, and FusionArc plans with one to five IMRT/hybrid beams.Results: The gradient factor was found to be highly predictive of the VMAT angles that would benefit plan quality the most from beam modulation. Over the three cases studied, a FusionArc plan with three converted beams achieved superior dosimetric quality with reductions in final cost ranging from 26.4% to 48.1% compared to single-arc VMAT. Additionally, the three beam FusionArc plans required 22.4%-43.7% fewer MU/Gy than a seven beam IMRT plan. While the FusionArc plans with five converted beams offer larger reductions in final cost-32.9%-55.2% compared to single-arc VMAT-the decrease in MU/Gy compared to IMRT was noticeably smaller at 12.2%-18.5%, when compared to IMRT.Conclusions: A hybrid VMAT/IMRT strategy was implemented to find a high quality compromise between gantry-angle and intensity-based degrees of freedom. This optimization method will allow patients to be simultaneously planned for dosimetric quality and delivery efficiency without switching between delivery techniques. Example phantom and clinical cases suggest that the conversion of only three VMAT segments to modulated beams may result in a good combination of quality and efficiency.« less