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Title: SU-F-T-554: Dark Current Effect On CyberKnife Beam Dosimetry

Abstract

Purpose: All RF linear accelerators produce dark current to varying degrees when an accelerating voltage and RF input is applied in the absence of electron gun injection. This study is to evaluate how dark current from the linear accelerator of CyberKnife affect the dose in the reference dosimetry. Methods: The G4 CyberKnife system with 6MV photon beam was used in this study. Using the ion chamber and the diode detector, the dose was measured in water with varying time delay between acquiring charges and staring beam-on after applying high-voltage into the linear accelerator. The dose was measured after the time delay with over the range of 0 to 120 seconds in the accelerating high-voltage mode without beam-on, applying 0, 10, 50, 100, and 200 MUs. For the measurements, the collimator of 60 mm was used and the detectors were placed at the depths of 10 cm with the source-to-surface distance of 80 cm. Results: The dark current was constant over time regardless of MU. The dose due to the dark current increased over time linearly with the R-squared value of 0.9983 up to 4.4 cGy for the time 120 seconds. In the dose rate setting of 720 MU/min, the relativemore » dose when applying the accelerating voltage without beam-on was increased over time up to 0.6% but it was less than the leakage radiation resulted from the accelerated head. As the reference dosimetry condition, when 100 MU was delivered after 10 seconds time delay, the relative dose increased by 0.7% but 6.7% for the low MU (10 MU). Conclusion: In the dosimetry using CyberKnife system, the constant dark current affected to the dose. Although the time delay in the accelerating high-voltage mode without beam-on is within 10 seconds, the dose less than 100 cGy can be overestimated more than 1%.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649129
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
07 ISOTOPES AND RADIATION SOURCES; DOSE RATES; DOSIMETRY; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; PHOTON BEAMS; TIME DELAY

Citation Formats

Kim, H, and Chang, A. SU-F-T-554: Dark Current Effect On CyberKnife Beam Dosimetry. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956739.
Kim, H, & Chang, A. SU-F-T-554: Dark Current Effect On CyberKnife Beam Dosimetry. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956739.
Kim, H, and Chang, A. Wed . "SU-F-T-554: Dark Current Effect On CyberKnife Beam Dosimetry". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956739.
@article{osti_22649129,
title = {SU-F-T-554: Dark Current Effect On CyberKnife Beam Dosimetry},
author = {Kim, H and Chang, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: All RF linear accelerators produce dark current to varying degrees when an accelerating voltage and RF input is applied in the absence of electron gun injection. This study is to evaluate how dark current from the linear accelerator of CyberKnife affect the dose in the reference dosimetry. Methods: The G4 CyberKnife system with 6MV photon beam was used in this study. Using the ion chamber and the diode detector, the dose was measured in water with varying time delay between acquiring charges and staring beam-on after applying high-voltage into the linear accelerator. The dose was measured after the time delay with over the range of 0 to 120 seconds in the accelerating high-voltage mode without beam-on, applying 0, 10, 50, 100, and 200 MUs. For the measurements, the collimator of 60 mm was used and the detectors were placed at the depths of 10 cm with the source-to-surface distance of 80 cm. Results: The dark current was constant over time regardless of MU. The dose due to the dark current increased over time linearly with the R-squared value of 0.9983 up to 4.4 cGy for the time 120 seconds. In the dose rate setting of 720 MU/min, the relative dose when applying the accelerating voltage without beam-on was increased over time up to 0.6% but it was less than the leakage radiation resulted from the accelerated head. As the reference dosimetry condition, when 100 MU was delivered after 10 seconds time delay, the relative dose increased by 0.7% but 6.7% for the low MU (10 MU). Conclusion: In the dosimetry using CyberKnife system, the constant dark current affected to the dose. Although the time delay in the accelerating high-voltage mode without beam-on is within 10 seconds, the dose less than 100 cGy can be overestimated more than 1%.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956739},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To study the critical analysis and efficacy of Linac and Cyberknife (CK) treatment plans for acoustic neuroma/schwannoma. Methods: Twelve of acoustic neuroma/schwannoma patients were taken for these study that. Treatment plans were generated in Multiplan treatment planning system (TPS) for CK using 5,7.5 and 10mm diameter collimators. Target volumes were in the range of 0.280 cc to 9.256 cc. Prescription dose (Rx) ranges from 1150cGy to 1950cGy delivered over 1 to 3 Fractions. For same patients stereotactic Volumetric modulated arc plans were generated using Elekta Linac with MLC thickness of 4mm in Monaco TPS. Appropriate calculation algorithms and gridmore » size were used with same Rx and organ at risk (OAR) constrains for both Linac and CK plans. Treatment plans were developed to achieve at least 95% of the target volume to receive the Rx. The dosimetric indices such as conformity index (CI), coverage, OAR dose and volume receiving 50% of Rx (V50%) were used to evaluate the plans. Results: Target volumes ranges from 0.280 cc to 3.5cc shows the CI of 1.16±0.109 and 1.53±0.360 for cyberknife and Linac plans respectively. For small volume targets, the OARs were well spared in CK plans. There are no significant differences in CI and OAR doses were observed between CK and Linac plans that have the target volume >3.5 cc. Perhaps the V50% were lesser in CK plans, and found to be 12.8± 8.4 and 22.8 ± 15.0 for CK and Linac respectively. Conclusion: The analysis shows the importance of collimator size for small volume targets. The target volumes >3.5 cc can be treated in Linac as comparable with CK. For targets <3.5cc CK plans showed superior plan quality with better CI and OAR sparing than the Linac based plans. Further studies may require evaluating the clinical advantage of CK robotic system.« less
  • Purpose: In small field geometries, the electronic equilibrium can be lost, making it challenging for the dose-calculation algorithm to accurately predict the dose, especially in the presence of tissue heterogeneities. In this study, dosimetric accuracy of Monte Carlo (MC) advanced dose calculation and sequential algorithms of Multiplan treatment planning system were investigated for small radiation fields incident on homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. Methods: Small open fields of fixed cones of Cyberknife M6 unit 100 to 500 mm2 were used for this study. The fields were incident on in house phantom containing lung, air, and bone inhomogeneities and also homogeneous phantom.more » Using the same film batch, the net OD to dose calibration curve was obtained using CK with the 60 mm fixed cone by delivering 0- 800 cGy. Films were scanned 48 hours after irradiation using an Epson 1000XL flatbed scanner. The dosimetric accuracy of MC and sequential algorithms in the presence of the inhomogeneities was compared against EBT3 film dosimetry Results: Open field tests in a homogeneous phantom showed good agreement between two algorithms and film measurement For MC algorithm, the minimum gamma analysis passing rates between measured and calculated dose distributions were 99.7% and 98.3% for homogeneous and inhomogeneous fields in the case of lung and bone respectively. For sequential algorithm, the minimum gamma analysis passing rates were 98.9% and 92.5% for for homogeneous and inhomogeneous fields respectively for used all cone sizes. In the case of the air heterogeneity, the differences were larger for both calculation algorithms. Overall, when compared to measurement, the MC had better agreement than sequential algorithm. Conclusion: The Monte Carlo calculation algorithm in the Multiplan treatment planning system is an improvement over the existing sequential algorithm. Dose discrepancies were observed for in the presence of air inhomogeneities.« less
  • Purpose To characterize the Cyberknife (CK) robotic system’s dosimetric accuracy of the delivery of MultiPlan’s Monte Carlo dose calculations using EBT3 radiochromic film inserted in a thorax phantom. Methods The CIRS XSight Lung Tracking (XLT) Phantom (model 10823) was used in this study with custom cut EBT3 film inserted in the horizontal (coronal) plane inside the lung tissue equivalent phantom. CK MultiPlan v3.5.3 with Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (1.5 mm grid size, 2% statistical uncertainty) was used to calculate a clinical plan for a 25-mm lung tumor lesion, as contoured by the physician, and then imported onto the XLTmore » phantom CT. Using the same film batch, the net OD to dose calibration curve was obtained using CK with the 60 mm fixed cone by delivering 0– 800 cGy. The test films (n=3) were irradiated using 325 cGy to the prescription point. Films were scanned 48 hours after irradiation using an Epson v700 scanner (48 bits color scan, extracted red channel only, 96 dpi). Percent absolute dose and relative isodose distribution difference relative to the planned dose were quantified using an in-house QA software program. Multiplan Monte Carlo dose calculation was validated using RCF dosimetry (EBT3) and gamma index criteria of 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm for absolute dose and relative isodose distribution measurement comparisons. Results EBT3 film measurements of the patient plans calculated with Monte Carlo in MultiPlan resulted in an absolute dose passing rate of 99.6±0.4% for the Gamma Index of 3%/3mm, 10% dose threshold, and 95.6±4.4% for 2%/2mm, 10% threshold criteria. The measured central axis absolute dose was within 1.2% (329.0±2.5 cGy) of the Monte Carlo planned dose (325.0±6.5 cGy) for that same point. Conclusion MultiPlan’s Monte Carlo dose calculation was validated using the EBT3 film absolute dosimetry for delivery in a heterogeneous thorax phantom.« less
  • Purpose: Absolute calibration of the CyberKnife is performed using a 6cm-diameter cone defined at 80cm SAD. Since kQ is defined using PDD values determined using 10×10 cm fields at 100cm SSD, the PDD must be corrected in order to correctly apply the quality conversion factor. The accepted method is based on equivalent field-size conversions of PDD values using BJR25. Using the new InCise MLC system, the CK is capable of generating a rectangular field equivalent to 10×10 cm square field. In this study, a comparison is made between kQ values determined using the traditional BJR25 method and the MLC methodmore » introduced herein. Methods: First, kQ(BJR) is determined: a PDD is acquired using a 6cm circular field at 100cm SSD, its field size converted to an equivalent square, and PDD converted to a 10×10cm field using the appropriate BJR25 table. Maintaining a consistent setup, the collimator is changed, and the MLC method is used. Finally, kQ is determined using PDDs acquired with a 9.71×10.31cm at 100cm SSD. This field is produced by setting the field to a size of 7.77×8.25cm (since it is defined at 80cm SAD). An exact 10×10cm field since field size is relegated to increments of its leaf width (0.25cm). This comparison is made using an Exradin A1SL, IBA CC08, IBA CC13, and an Exradin A19. For each detector and collimator type, the beam injector was adjusted to give 5 different beam qualities; representing a range of clinical systems. Results: Averaging across all beam qualities, kQ(MLC) differed from kQ(BJR) by less than 0.15%. The difference between the values increased with detector volume. Conclusion: For CK users with standard cone collimators, the BJR25 method has been verified. For CK users the MLC system, a technique is described to determine kQ. Primary author is the President/Owner of Spectrum Medical Physics, LLC, a company which maintains contracts with Siemens Healthcare and Standard Imaging, Inc.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the practicality use of ionization chambers with different volumes for delivery quality assurance of CyberKnife plans, Methods: Dosimetric measurements with a spherical solid water phantom and three ionization chambers with volumes of 0.13, 0.04, and 0.01 cm3 (IBA CC13, CC04, and CC01, respectively) were performed for various CyberKnife clinical treatment plans including both isocentric and nonisocentric delivery. For each chamber, the ion recombination correction factors Ks were calculated using the Jaffe plot method and twovoltage method at a 10-cm depth for a 60-mm collimator field in a water phantom. The polarity correction factors Kpol were determined formore » 5–60-mm collimator fields in same experimental setup. The measured doses were compared to the doses for the detectors calculated using a treatment planning system. Results: The differences in the Ks between the Jaffe plot method and two-voltage method were −0.12, −0.02, and 0.89% for CC13, CC04, and CC01, respectively. The changes in Kpol for the different field sizes were 0.2, 0.3, and 0.8% for CC13, CC04, and CC01, respectively. The measured doses for CC04 and CC01 were within 3% of the calculated doses for the clinical treatment plans with isocentric delivery with collimator fields greater than 12.5 mm. Those for CC13 had differences of over 3% for the plans with isocentric delivery with collimator fields less than 15 mm. The differences for the isocentric plans were similar to those for the single beam plans. The measured doses for each chamber were within 3% of the calculated doses for the non-isocentric plans except for that with a PTV volume less than 1.0 cm{sup 3}. Conclusion: Although there are some limitations, the ionization chamber with a smaller volume is a better detector for verification of the CyberKnife plans owing to the high spatial resolution.« less