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Title: SU-F-T-493: An Investigation Into the Feasibility of Using PipsPro Software with Film for Linac QA

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using radiochromic and radiographic film with Pipspro software for quality assurance of linear accelerators with no on-board imaging. Methods: The linear accelerator being used is a Varian Clinac 21EX. All IGRT is performed using the BrainLab ExacTrac system. Because of the lack of on board imaging, certain monthly and annual TG-142 quality assurance tests are more difficult to perform and analyze to a high degree of accuracy. Pipspro was not designed to be used with hard film, and to our knowledge its use with film had not been investigated. The film used will be GafChromic EBT3 film and Kodak EDR2 film, scanned with an Epson V700 scanner. The following routine tests will be attempted: MLC picket fence, light vs. radiation field coincidence, starshots, and MLC transmission. Results: The only tests that gave accurate and reliable results were the couch, gantry, and collimator starshots. Typical MV and kV images are acquired with a much higher level of contrast between the irradiated and non-irradiated areas when compared to film. Pipspro relies on this level of contrast to be able to automatically detect the fiducial points from its phantom devices, leaf edges for picket fence and transmissionmore » tests, and jaw edges for light vs. radiation field tests. Because of this, certain tests gave erroneous results and others were not able to be performed in the software at all, with either type of film. The number of monitor units delivered to the film, the experimental setup, and the scan settings was not able to rectify the problem. Conclusion: For linear accelerators with no on-board imaging, it is not recommended to use hard film with PipsPro to perform TG-142 quality assurance tests. Other software or methods should instead be investigated.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Radiation Oncology Services, Inc, Atlanta, GA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649080
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTER CODES; CUSPED GEOMETRIES; FIELD TESTS; IMAGES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; QUALITY ASSURANCE; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Underwood, R. SU-F-T-493: An Investigation Into the Feasibility of Using PipsPro Software with Film for Linac QA. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956678.
Underwood, R. SU-F-T-493: An Investigation Into the Feasibility of Using PipsPro Software with Film for Linac QA. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956678.
Underwood, R. 2016. "SU-F-T-493: An Investigation Into the Feasibility of Using PipsPro Software with Film for Linac QA". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956678.
@article{osti_22649080,
title = {SU-F-T-493: An Investigation Into the Feasibility of Using PipsPro Software with Film for Linac QA},
author = {Underwood, R},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using radiochromic and radiographic film with Pipspro software for quality assurance of linear accelerators with no on-board imaging. Methods: The linear accelerator being used is a Varian Clinac 21EX. All IGRT is performed using the BrainLab ExacTrac system. Because of the lack of on board imaging, certain monthly and annual TG-142 quality assurance tests are more difficult to perform and analyze to a high degree of accuracy. Pipspro was not designed to be used with hard film, and to our knowledge its use with film had not been investigated. The film used will be GafChromic EBT3 film and Kodak EDR2 film, scanned with an Epson V700 scanner. The following routine tests will be attempted: MLC picket fence, light vs. radiation field coincidence, starshots, and MLC transmission. Results: The only tests that gave accurate and reliable results were the couch, gantry, and collimator starshots. Typical MV and kV images are acquired with a much higher level of contrast between the irradiated and non-irradiated areas when compared to film. Pipspro relies on this level of contrast to be able to automatically detect the fiducial points from its phantom devices, leaf edges for picket fence and transmission tests, and jaw edges for light vs. radiation field tests. Because of this, certain tests gave erroneous results and others were not able to be performed in the software at all, with either type of film. The number of monitor units delivered to the film, the experimental setup, and the scan settings was not able to rectify the problem. Conclusion: For linear accelerators with no on-board imaging, it is not recommended to use hard film with PipsPro to perform TG-142 quality assurance tests. Other software or methods should instead be investigated.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956678},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To study feasibility of using small plastic phantoms designed for conventional linac output auditing to measure the output of MR-Linac systems. Methods: For simulations, the CT scan of an IROC(formerly RPC) acrylic block phantom designed for 8 MV beams was imported in a research version of the treatment planning system (Monaco). Dose delivered to three TLDs in the block was calculated with a Monte Carlo algorithm and a beam model based on an MR-linac prototype with and without a magnetic field (B=1.5T). In a large mathematical water phantom, the same beam was used to calculate dose in full scattermore » conditions. The block factor (F) was calculated as the ratio of the average dose to the block TLDs to the dose at the reference point in the mathematical phantom. For experimental measurement, four IROC blocks were irradiated with the MR-linac prototype, and data were analyzed by IROC. Results: The F factor without a B field was 1.053. When a B field was applied, it changed the dose distribution in the block, especially on the edges. With a B field parallel to the long axes of the TLD, F was 1.038. However, with a perpendicular B field, F factor increased slightly to 1.075. In the IROC report, the output determined with two blocks parallel to the B field was 2.3% higher than the output by the two blocks perpendicular to the B field. The average of all four blocks was within 2% of machine output measured with an ion chamber. Conclusion: It may be feasible to expand the utility of the acrylic block phantoms for radiation output auditing from conventional linacs to MR-linacs. However, the scatter correction factor can change due to the B field and its orientation to the block. More symmetric phantom designs may be less prone to mistakes. We acknowledge research support from Elekta.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate whether a strong magnetic field (B=1.5 T) can affect dose responses of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) and Gafchromic films using an MR-Linac (Elekta) before and after the magnet was ramped down from 1.5 T to 0 T. Methods: Three types of dosimeters (TLDs, OSLDs, EBT3 films) were divided into two groups. Group 1 was first irradiated in a phantom of Solid Water slabs (Standard Imaging) inside a B=1.5 T field with a 7 MV beam from an MR-Linac system. The radiation output at the location of the dosimeters (isocenter at 10 cm depth)more » was measured using an ion chamber (NE2571, Phoenix Dosimetry). Three doses (150, 300, 600 MU, corresponding to 1.18, 2.36, and 4.74 Gy) were delivered to the dosimeters. A week later the MR magnet was ramped down to zero field and dosimeters in Group 2 were irradiated with the same MUs. Dosimeters of each type were read out during the same session (about 4 weeks post irradiation in the B field, and 3 weeks with no B field). The ratios of signals between Group 1 and Group 2 were calculated. Results: Radiation output measured with the chamber was within 1% before and after ramping down the MR magnet. For TLDs, the ratio of signals with B field to signals without B field averaged over three dose levels was 1.003±0.016; for OSLDs, the ratio was 0.994±0.022; for films, the ratios of two batches (different manufacturing dates) were 0.997 and 0.985. Conclusion: Dose responses of all three dosimeters seem not affected by the presence of a 1.5 T magnetic field within uncertainty of ∼2%. More measurements will be conducted to test reproducibility. We acknowledge research support from Elekta AB.« less
  • Linear light polarizing films selectively transmit radiations vibrating along an electromagnetic radiation vector and selectively absorb radiations vibrating along a second electromagnetic radiation vector. It happens according to the anisotropy of the film . In the present study the polarization effects of methylene blue sensitized polyvinyl alcohol is investigated. The polarization effects on the dye concentration, heating and stretching of film also are evaluated.
  • Purpose: Cranio-spinal irradiation is the most complicated format of the conventional external beam radiation therapy because it involves matches of non-coplanar beams which are susceptible to daily setup errors. This study explores the efficacy of Gafchromic film dosimetry to quantitatively verify the junctions for cranio-spinal radiation feathered with field in field technique. Methods: 15cm in thickness of solid water phantom was scanned vertically and exported to the Pinnacle TPS as primary phantom data set. A patient cranio-spinal plan, consisted of two bilateral whole brain beams dynamically matched with a posterior spinal beam using field in field technique, was transferred tomore » the phantom and recalculated for one fraction with set monitor units identical to the original plan. Next, planar dose distribution on the phantom was exported to the FilmQA Pro 2013 software (Ashland, Inc.) in binary format for comparison with the measured dose distribution. An EBT2 film was sandwiched in the middle of the phantom and the phantom was set up according to the QA plan based on the room laser system. The shifts instructions associated with the patient original plan were made and the beams from the patient original plan delivered to the solid water phantom via the record and verify system in QA mode. The dose distribution from the measured film was compared with the planned reference distribution using gamma analysis and profile comparison. Results: Gamma passing rate of 91 % with DTA 3mm and 5% dose difference was obtained within the junction region, significantly greater passing rate above 95 % was obtained in the homogeneous region of the brain field. Conclusion: This study confirms that Gafchromic film dosimetry can be used to validate the efficacy of FIF feathering technique for cranio-spinal treatment. FIF technique with Gafchromic dosimetry may now be the new standard for delivering efficient and accurate cranio-spinal radiation with confidence.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a postal dosimeter consisting of EBT3 films and a miniature Lucite phantom to be used for photon beams output audits for mega-voltage photon beams across the Saudi Arabia. Methods: Two batches of EBT3 films were calibrated in 5 mega-voltage photon beams with energies ranging between 6 MV and 18 MV in the dose range between 0 to 4 Gy. A 4×4×20 cm{sup 3} lucite phantom was constructed to be used as an irradiation phantom. The lucite irradiation phantom consists of two parts and allows for embedding a 2.5×2.0 cm{sup 2} EBT3 film at 8.9more » cm depth. Factors that convert the dose measured in the lucite irradiation phantom at 8.9 cm depth to the dose at 10 cm depth in water for 10×10 cm{sup 2} field for different photon energies were calculated using the dosxyznrc/EGSnrcMP user code. The performance of the proposed postal dosimeter was tested in 17 different photon beams across 4 radiotherapy centres in Saudi Arabia. The outputs of the 17 beams are monitored by either the International Atomic Energy Agency or by the Radiological Physics Centre. Results: For the 17 photon beams, the average of the ratios of measured to stated outputs was 1.01 ± 0.02 and with a maximum ratio of 1.05. Conclusion: The results of our work indicate that the proposed postal dosimetry system can be used for national auditing of outputs for mega-voltage photon beams. The service can be offered to other national radiotherapy centres or to a be used for credentialing of centres participating in national trials.« less