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Title: SU-F-T-485: Independent Remote Audits for TG51 NonCompliant Photon Beams Performed by the IROC Houston QA Center

Abstract

Purpose: IROC-H conducts external audits for output check verification of photon and electron beams. Many of these beams can meet the geometric requirements of the TG 51 calibration protocol. For those photon beams that are non TG 51 compliant like Elekta GammaKnife, Accuray CyberKnife and TomoTherapy, IROC-H has specific audit tools to monitor the reference calibration. Methods: IROC-H used its TLD and OSLD remote monitoring systems to verify the output of machines with TG 51 non compliant beams. Acrylic OSLD miniphantoms are used for the CyberKnife. Special TLD phantoms are used for TomoTherapy and GammaKnife machines to accommodate the specific geometry of each machine. These remote audit tools are sent to institutions to be irradiated and returned to IROC-H for analysis. Results: The average IROC-H/institution ratios for 480 GammaKnife, 660 CyberKnife and 907 rotational TomoTherapy beams are 1.000±0.021, 1.008±0.019, 0.974±0.023, respectively. In the particular case of TomoTherapy, the overall ratio is 0.977±0.022 for HD units. The standard deviations of all results are consistent with values determined for TG 51 compliant photon beams. These ratios have shown some changes compared to values presented in 2008. The GammaKnife results were corrected by an experimentally determined scatter factor of 1.025 in 2013. Themore » TomoTherapy helical beam results are now from a rotational beam whereas in 2008 the results were from a static beam. The decision to change modality was based on recommendations from the users. Conclusion: External audits of beam outputs is a valuable tool to confirm the calibrations of photon beams regardless of whether the machine is TG 51 or TG 51 non compliant. The difference found for TomoTherapy units is under investigation. This investigation was supported by IROC grant CA180803 awarded by the NCI.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649072
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AUDITS; CALIBRATION; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CT-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY; ELECTRON BEAMS; PHOTON BEAMS

Citation Formats

Alvarez, P, Molineu, A, Lowenstein, J, Taylor, P, Kry, S, and Followill, D. SU-F-T-485: Independent Remote Audits for TG51 NonCompliant Photon Beams Performed by the IROC Houston QA Center. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956670.
Alvarez, P, Molineu, A, Lowenstein, J, Taylor, P, Kry, S, & Followill, D. SU-F-T-485: Independent Remote Audits for TG51 NonCompliant Photon Beams Performed by the IROC Houston QA Center. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956670.
Alvarez, P, Molineu, A, Lowenstein, J, Taylor, P, Kry, S, and Followill, D. 2016. "SU-F-T-485: Independent Remote Audits for TG51 NonCompliant Photon Beams Performed by the IROC Houston QA Center". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956670.
@article{osti_22649072,
title = {SU-F-T-485: Independent Remote Audits for TG51 NonCompliant Photon Beams Performed by the IROC Houston QA Center},
author = {Alvarez, P and Molineu, A and Lowenstein, J and Taylor, P and Kry, S and Followill, D},
abstractNote = {Purpose: IROC-H conducts external audits for output check verification of photon and electron beams. Many of these beams can meet the geometric requirements of the TG 51 calibration protocol. For those photon beams that are non TG 51 compliant like Elekta GammaKnife, Accuray CyberKnife and TomoTherapy, IROC-H has specific audit tools to monitor the reference calibration. Methods: IROC-H used its TLD and OSLD remote monitoring systems to verify the output of machines with TG 51 non compliant beams. Acrylic OSLD miniphantoms are used for the CyberKnife. Special TLD phantoms are used for TomoTherapy and GammaKnife machines to accommodate the specific geometry of each machine. These remote audit tools are sent to institutions to be irradiated and returned to IROC-H for analysis. Results: The average IROC-H/institution ratios for 480 GammaKnife, 660 CyberKnife and 907 rotational TomoTherapy beams are 1.000±0.021, 1.008±0.019, 0.974±0.023, respectively. In the particular case of TomoTherapy, the overall ratio is 0.977±0.022 for HD units. The standard deviations of all results are consistent with values determined for TG 51 compliant photon beams. These ratios have shown some changes compared to values presented in 2008. The GammaKnife results were corrected by an experimentally determined scatter factor of 1.025 in 2013. The TomoTherapy helical beam results are now from a rotational beam whereas in 2008 the results were from a static beam. The decision to change modality was based on recommendations from the users. Conclusion: External audits of beam outputs is a valuable tool to confirm the calibrations of photon beams regardless of whether the machine is TG 51 or TG 51 non compliant. The difference found for TomoTherapy units is under investigation. This investigation was supported by IROC grant CA180803 awarded by the NCI.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956670},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To highlight the IROC Houston on-site dosimetry audit program, and to investigate the impact of clinical conditions on the frequency of errors/recommendations noted by IROC Houston. Methods: The results of IROC Houston on-site audits from 2000-present were abstracted and compared to clinical parameters, this included 409 institutions and 1020 linacs. In particular, we investigated the frequency of recommendations versus year, and the impact of repeat visits on the number of recommendations. We also investigated the impact on the number of recommendations of several clinical parameters: the number and age of the linacs, the linac/TPS combination, and the scope ofmore » the QA program. Results: The number of recommendations per institution (3.1 average) has shown decline between 2000 and present, although the number of recommendations per machine (0.89) has not changed. Previous IROC Houston site visits did not Result in fewer recommendations on a repeat visit, but IROC Houston tests have changed substantially during the last 15 years as radiotherapy technology has changed. There was no impact on the number of recommendations based on the number of machines at the institution or the age of a given machine. The fewest recommendations were observed for Varian-Eclipse combinations (0.71 recs/machine), while Elekta- Pinnacle combinations yielded the most (1.62 recs/machine). Finally, in the TG-142 era (post-2010), those institutions that had a QA recommendation (n=77) had significantly more other recommendations (1.83 per institution) than those that had no QA rec (n=12, 1.33 per institution). Conclusion: Establishing and maintaining a successful radiotherapy program is challenging and areas of improvement can routinely be identified. Clinical conditions such as linac-TPS combinations and the establishment of a good QA program impact the frequency of errors/deficiencies identified by IROC Houston during their on-site review process.« less
  • Purpose: To describe the extent of IROC Houston’s (formerly the RPC) QA activities and audit results for radiotherapy institutions outside of North America (NA). Methods: The IROC Houston’s QA program components were designed to audit the radiation dose calculation chain from the NIST traceable reference beam calibration, to inclusion of dosimetry parameters used to calculate tumor doses, to the delivery of the radiation dose. The QA program provided to international institutions includes: 1) remote TLD/OSLD audit of machine output, 2) credentialing for advanced technologies, and 3) review of patient treatment records. IROC Houston uses the same standards and acceptance criteriamore » for all of its audits whether for North American or international sites. Results: IROC Houston’s QA program has reached out to radiotherapy sites in 43 different countries since 2013 through their participation in clinical trials. In the past two years, 2,778 international megavoltage beam outputs were audited with OSLD/TLD. While the average IROC/Inst ratio is near unity for all sites monitored, there are international regions whose results are significantly different from the NA region. In the past 2 years, 477 and 87 IMRT H&N phantoms were irradiated at NA and international sites, respectively. Regardless of the OSLD beam audit results, the overall pass rate (87 percent) for all international sites (no region separation) is equal to the NA sites. Of the 182 international patient charts reviewed, 10.7 percent of the dose calculation points did not meet our acceptance criterion as compared to 13.6 percent for NA sites. The lower pass rate for NA sites results from a much larger brachytherapy component which has been shown to be more error prone. Conclusion: IROC Houston has expanded its QA services worldwide and continues a long history of improving radiotherapy dose delivery in many countries. Funding received for QA audit services from the Korean GOG, DAHANCA, EORTC, ICON and CMIC Group.« less
  • Purpose: Analysis of the performance of the microSTARii reader for optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) used by the IROC Houston Quality Assurance Center (IROC HQAC) for external audits compare to the characteristics of the Microstar reader. Methods: The IROC HQAC uses the Microstar reader for the OSLD program for verification of output of photon, electron and proton beams. The calculation of dose from the OSLD system is based on a group of factors defined at time of the commissioning of a batch of detectors. Factors like system sensitivity (SS), depletion (KD), element correction factor (ECF), linearity (KL), energy correction (KE).more » The new microSTARii unit presents many hardware and software upgrades that were considered useful for this program. Based on these changes many factors, that were considered reader dependent, were revised in order to analyze the effect of the new reading process. The SS, KD, ECF and KL were evaluated and compared with data defined based on reading done on Microstar reader. Results: The SS is reader specific and specified at 100 cGy dose level. This value is define per reading session and monitored over time. The KD factor was found to be different because of reading procedure are different. The ECF values changed for a group of nano dots compare to values defined based on reading done on the Microstar reader. The KL was defined for the reader. Conclusion: The new microSTARii reader presents new features that improve the efficiency of the OSLD program at the IROC HQAC. New characterization is needed before final implementation is done to match the requirements of the existing OSLD system defined for the Microstar reader. Changes in uncertainty of the results has not been analized.« less
  • Purpose: To provide information pertaining to IROC Houston QA Center's (RPC) credentialing process for institutions participating in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: IROC Houston issues credentials for NCI sponsored study groups. Requirements for credentialing might include any combination of questionnaires, knowledge assessment forms, benchmarks, or phantom irradiations. Credentialing requirements for specific protocols can be found on IROC Houston's website (irochouston.mdanderson.org). The website also houses the credentialing status inquiry (CSI) form. Once an institution has reviewed the protocol's credentialing requirements, a CSI form should be completed and submitted to IROC Houston. This form is used both to request whether requirements have beenmore » met as well as to notify IROC Houston that the institution requests credentialing for a specific protocol. IROC Houston will contact the institution to discuss any delinquent requirements. Once the institution has met all requirements IROC Houston issues a credentialing letter to the institution and will inform study groups and other IROC offices of the credentials. Institutions can all phone the IROC Houston office to initiate credentialing or ask any credentialing related questions. Results: Since 2010 IROC has received 1313 credentialing status inquiry forms. We received 317 in 2010, 266 in 2011, 324 in 2012, and 406 in 2013. On average we receive 35 phone calls per week with multiple types of credentialing questions. Decisions regarding credentialing status are based on the protocol specifications and previous completed credentialing by the institution. In some cases, such as for general IMRT credentialing, up to 5 sites may be credentialed based on the credentialing of one main center. Each of these situations is handled individually. Conclusion: IROC Houston will issue radiation therapy credentials for the NCI trials in the National Clinical Trials Network. Credentialing requirements and the CSI form can be found online at the IROC Houston's website. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA081647 (NCI, DHHS)« less
  • Purpose: Analyze the results from irradiations of an anthropomorphic liver phantom based on irradiation technique and number of isocenters used for the SBRT delivery. Methods: The phantom consists of a water-fillable plastic shell that has a polystyrene insert, representing the liver which includes two Solid WaterTM targets (PTV1 and PTV2) mimicking liver metastases. The two targets, PTV1 and PTV2 are non-coplanar and are an ovoid 2 cm in diameter and 2.5 cm long and a 3 cm diameter sphere, respectively. Each PTV houses one TLD and 2 planes of radiochromic film. The phantom and a motion table to simulate respiratorymore » motion is sent to institutions sthat are instructed to design and deliver a stereotactic treatment plan that delivers 6 Gy to ≥ 95% of each PTV. The maximum motion of the phantom on the motion table was 1 cm in the superior-inferior direction. Results: Irradiations from 93 institutions have been analyzed. The acceptance criteria are ±7% for the TLD and 85% of the pixels in a region surrounding each PTV passing a ±7%/4 mm global gamma analysis. Sixty-seven (71%) irradiations meet this criteria. The majority, 74 (80%), of the irradiations were performed with IMRT. 73% of the IMRT deliveries were within criteria and 68% of the 3D CRT delivery were within criteria. 32 of the irradiations had a single isocenter plan, 50 were performed with two isocenters and 11 irradiations were performed with CyberKnife and TomoTherapy units where the concept of isocenter is not applicable. The pass rate for the single, dual and no isocenter irradiations were 69%, 74% and 73%, respectively and are not statistically different. Conclusion: The pass rate for the anthropomorphic liver phantom is approximately 70%. There does not seem to be any correlation with number of isocenters used or irradiation technique used for the delivery. This work was supported by PHS CA180803 awarded by NCI, DHHS.« less