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Title: SU-F-T-481: Physics Evaluation of a Newly Released InCise™ Multileaf Collimator for CyberKnife M6™ System

Abstract

Purpose: This work reports the results of the physics evaluation of a newly released InCise™2 Multileaf Collimator (MLC) installed in our institution. Methods: Beam property data was measured with unshielded diode and EBT2 films. The measurements included MLC leaf transmission, beam profiles, output factors and tissue-phantom ratios. MLC performance was evaluated for one month after commissioning. Weekly Garden Fence tests were performed for leaf / bank positioning in standard (A/P) and clinically relevant non-standard positions, before and after MLC driving exercises of 10+ minutes. Daily Picket Fence test and AQA test, End-to-End tests and dosimetric quality assurance were performed to evaluate the overall system performance. Results: All measurements including beam energy, flatness and symmetry, were within manufacture specifications. Leaf transmission was 0.4% <0.5% specification. The values of output factors ranged from 0.825 (7.6 mm × 7.5 mm) to 1.026 (115.0 mm × 100.1 mm). Average beam penumbra at 10 cm depth ranged from 2.7mm/2.7mm(7.6 mm × 7.5 mm) to 6.0 mm/6.2mm(84.6 mm × 84.7 mm). Slight penumbra difference (<10% from average penumbra for fields >20 mm) was observed in the direction perpendicular to leaf motion due to the tilting of the leaf housing. Mean leaf position offsets was −0.08±0.07mm andmore » −0.13 ± 0.08 for X1 and X2 leaf banks in 13 Garden Fence tests. No significant difference on average leaf positioning offsets was observed between different leaf orientations and before/after MLC driving exercises. Six End-to-End tests showed 0.43±0.23mm overall targeting accuracy. Picket-Fence and AQA showed stable performance of MLC during the test period. Dosimetric point dose measurements for test cases agreed with calculation within 3%. All film measurements on relative dose had Gamma (2%, 2mm) passing rate of >95%. Conclusion: The Incise™2 MLC for CyberKnife M6™ was proven to be accurate and reliable, and it is currently in clinical use. Stanford was one of the physics evaluation sites for the newly released InCise 2 MLC for Accuray Inc.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Stanford University Cancer Center, Stanford, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649071
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
07 ISOTOPES AND RADIATION SOURCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BEAM PROFILES; COLLIMATORS; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; CUSPED GEOMETRIES; EVALUATION; LEAVES; PERFORMANCE; POSITIONING; QUALITY ASSURANCE

Citation Formats

Wang, L, Chin, E, and Lo, A. SU-F-T-481: Physics Evaluation of a Newly Released InCise™ Multileaf Collimator for CyberKnife M6™ System. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956666.
Wang, L, Chin, E, & Lo, A. SU-F-T-481: Physics Evaluation of a Newly Released InCise™ Multileaf Collimator for CyberKnife M6™ System. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956666.
Wang, L, Chin, E, and Lo, A. 2016. "SU-F-T-481: Physics Evaluation of a Newly Released InCise™ Multileaf Collimator for CyberKnife M6™ System". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956666.
@article{osti_22649071,
title = {SU-F-T-481: Physics Evaluation of a Newly Released InCise™ Multileaf Collimator for CyberKnife M6™ System},
author = {Wang, L and Chin, E and Lo, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: This work reports the results of the physics evaluation of a newly released InCise™2 Multileaf Collimator (MLC) installed in our institution. Methods: Beam property data was measured with unshielded diode and EBT2 films. The measurements included MLC leaf transmission, beam profiles, output factors and tissue-phantom ratios. MLC performance was evaluated for one month after commissioning. Weekly Garden Fence tests were performed for leaf / bank positioning in standard (A/P) and clinically relevant non-standard positions, before and after MLC driving exercises of 10+ minutes. Daily Picket Fence test and AQA test, End-to-End tests and dosimetric quality assurance were performed to evaluate the overall system performance. Results: All measurements including beam energy, flatness and symmetry, were within manufacture specifications. Leaf transmission was 0.4% <0.5% specification. The values of output factors ranged from 0.825 (7.6 mm × 7.5 mm) to 1.026 (115.0 mm × 100.1 mm). Average beam penumbra at 10 cm depth ranged from 2.7mm/2.7mm(7.6 mm × 7.5 mm) to 6.0 mm/6.2mm(84.6 mm × 84.7 mm). Slight penumbra difference (<10% from average penumbra for fields >20 mm) was observed in the direction perpendicular to leaf motion due to the tilting of the leaf housing. Mean leaf position offsets was −0.08±0.07mm and −0.13 ± 0.08 for X1 and X2 leaf banks in 13 Garden Fence tests. No significant difference on average leaf positioning offsets was observed between different leaf orientations and before/after MLC driving exercises. Six End-to-End tests showed 0.43±0.23mm overall targeting accuracy. Picket-Fence and AQA showed stable performance of MLC during the test period. Dosimetric point dose measurements for test cases agreed with calculation within 3%. All film measurements on relative dose had Gamma (2%, 2mm) passing rate of >95%. Conclusion: The Incise™2 MLC for CyberKnife M6™ was proven to be accurate and reliable, and it is currently in clinical use. Stanford was one of the physics evaluation sites for the newly released InCise 2 MLC for Accuray Inc.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956666},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Accuray recently released a new collimator, the InCise™ Multileaf Collimator (MLC), for clinical use with the CyberKnife M6™ System. This work reports the results of acceptance testing and commissioning measurements for this collimator. Methods: The MLC consists of 41 pairs of 2.5 mm wide leaves projecting a clinical maximum field size of 110 mm x 97.5 mm at 800 mm SAD. The leaves are made of tungsten, 90 mm in height and tilted by 0.5 degree. The manufacturer stated leaf positioning accuracy and reproducibility are 0.5 mm and 0.4 mm respectively at 800 mm SAD. The leaf over-travel ismore » 100% with full interdigitation capability. Acceptance testing included, but are not limited to, the verification of the specifications of various parameters described above, leakage measurements and end-to-end tests. Dosimetric measurements included, but not limited to, measurements of output factors, open beam profiles, tissue-phantom ratios, beam flatness and symmetry, and patient specific QA. Results: All measurements were well within the manufacturer specifications. The values of output factors ranged from 0.804 (smallest field size of 7.6 mm x 7.5 mm) to 1.018 (largest field size of 110.0 mm x 97.5 mm). End-to-end test results for the various tracking modes are: Skull (0.27mm), fiducial (0.16mm), Xsight Spine (0.4mm), Xsight Lung (0.93 mm) and Synchrony (0.43mm). Measured maximum and average leakage was 0.37% and 0.3%, respectively. Patient-specific QA measurements with chamber were all within 5% absolute dose agreement, and film measurements all passed 2%/2mm gamma evaluation for more than 95% of measurement points. Conclusion: The presented results are the first set of data reported on the InCise™ MLC. The MLC proved to be very reliable and is currently in clinical use.« less
  • Purpose: For small field dosimetry, such as measurements of output factors for cones or MLC-shaped irregular small fields, ion chambers often Result in an underestimation of the dose, due to both the volume averaging effect and the lack of lateral charged particle equilibrium. This work presents a mathematical model for correction matrix for a PTW PinPoint ionization chamber for dosimetric measurements made in the newly released Incise™ Multileaf collimator fields of the CyberKnife M6™ machine. Methods: A correction matrix for a PTW 0.015cc PinPoint ionization chamber was developed by modeling its 3D dose response in twelve cone-shaped circular fields createdmore » using the 5mm, 7.5mm, 10mm, 12.5mm, 15mm, 20mm, 25mm, 30mm, 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 60mm cones in a CyberKnife M6™ machine. For each field size, hundreds of readings were recorded for every 2mm chamber shift in the horizontal plane. The contribution of each dose pixel to a measurement point depended on the radial distance and the angle to the chamber axis. These readings were then compared with the theoretical dose as obtained with Monte Carlo calculation. A penalized least-square optimization algorithm was developed to generate the correction matrix. After the parameter fitting, the mathematical model was validated for MLC-shaped irregular fields. Results: The optimization algorithm used for parameter fitting was stable and the resulted response factors were smooth in spatial domain. After correction with the mathematical model, the chamber reading matched with the calculation for all the tested fields to within 2%. Conclusion: A novel mathematical model has been developed for PinPoint chamber for dosimetric measurements in small MLC-shaped irregular fields. The correction matrix is dependent on detector, treatment unit and the geometry of setup. The model can be applied to non-standard composite fields and provides an access to IMRT point dose validation.« less
  • Purpose: The InCise™ Multileaf Collimator (MLC) of CyberKnife M6™ System has been released recently. The purpose of this study was to explore the dosimetric characteristics of the new MLC. In particular, the penumbra characteristics of MLC fields at varying locations are evaluated. Methods: EBT3-based film measurements were performed with varying MLC fields ranging from 7.5 mm to 27.5 mm. Seventeen regions of interests (ROIs) were identified for irradiation. These are regions located at the central area (denoted as reference field), at the left/right edge areas of reference open field, at an intermediate location between central and edge area. Single beammore » treatment plans were designed by using the MultiPlan and was delivered using the Blue Phantom. Gafchromic films were irradiated at 1.5 cm depth in the Blue Phantom and analyzed using the Film Pro software. Variation of maximum dose, penumbra of MLC-defined fields, and symmetry/flatness were calculated as a function of locations of MLC fields. Results: The InCise™ MLC System showed relatively consistent dose distribution and penumbra size with varying locations of MLC fields. The measured maximum dose varied within 5 % at different locations compared to that at the central location and agreed with the calculated data well within 2%. The measured penumbrae were in the range of 2.9 mm and 3.7 mm and were relatively consistent regardless of locations. However, dose profiles in the out-of-field and in-field regions varied with locations and field sizes. Strong variation was seen for all fields located at 55 mm away from the central field. The MLC leakage map showed that the leakage is dependent on position. Conclusion: The size of penumbra and normalized maximum dose for MLC-defined fields were consistent in different regions of MLC. However, dose profiles in the out-field region varied with locations and field sizes.« less
  • Purpose: This study evaluated usability of Multileaf collimator (MLC) for diagnostic radiation in cephalometric exposure using optical stimulated luminance dosimeters (OSLDs) Methods: The MLC material was made alloy tool steel (SKD-11) and the density of it is 7.89g/m3 that is similar to it of steel (Fe, 7.85 g/m3) and the MLC was attached to general radiography unit (Rex-650R, Listem Inc, Korea) for cephalometric exposure. The OSLDs that used were nanoDotTM Dosimeter (Landauer Inc, Glenwood, USA) and we read out OSLDs with micro star system (Landauer Inc, Glenwood, USA). The Optical annealing system contained fluorescent lamps (Osram lumilux, 24 W, 280more » ∼780 nm). To measure absorbed dose using OSLDs, was carried out dosimetric characteristics of OSLDs. Based on these, we evaluated dose reduction of critical organ (Eyes, Thyroids) with MLC in cephalometric exposure Results: The dosimetric characteristics were following that batch homogeneity was 1.21% and reproducibility was 0.96% of the coefficient of variation The linearity was that the correlation of between dose and count was fitted by linear function (dose,mGy = 0.00029 × Count, R2 =0.997). The range of angular dependence was from −3.6% to 3.7% variation when each degree was normalized by zero degree. The organ dose of Rt. eye, Lt eye, thyroids were 77.8 μGy, 337.0 μGy, 323.1μGy, respectively in open field and the dose reduction of organ dose was 10.6%(8.3μGy), 12.4 %(42 μGy), 87.1%(281.4μGy) with MLC Conclusion: We certified dose reduction of organ dose in cephalometric exposure. The dose reduction of Eye was 11% because of reduction of field size and it of thyroids was 87% by primary beam shielding.« less
  • Purpose: Dynamically compensating for target motion during radiotherapy will increase treatment accuracy. A laboratory system for real-time target tracking with a dynamic MLC has been developed. In this study, the geometric accuracy limits of this DMLC target tracking system were evaluated. Methods and Materials: A motion simulator was programmed to follow patient-derived tumor motion paths, parallel to the leaf motion direction. A target attached to the simulator was optically tracked, and the leaf positions adjusted to continually align the DMLC beam aperture to the target. Analysis of the tracking accuracy was based on video images of the target and beammore » alignment. The system response time was determined and the tracking error measured. Response time-corrected tracking accuracy was also calculated to investigate the accuracy limits of an improved system. Results: The response time of the system is 160 {+-} 2 ms. The geometric precision for tracking patient motion is 0.6 to 1.1 mm (1{sigma}) for the 3 patient datasets tested, with tracking errors relative to the original patient motion of 35, 40, and 100%. Conclusions: A DMLC target tracking system has been developed that can account for detected motion parallel to the leaf motion direction. The tracking error has a negligible systematic component. Reducing the response time will further increase the overall system accuracy.« less