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Title: SU-F-T-454: Dose-Mass-Histogram Sensitivity to Anatomical Changes During Radiotherapy for HNSCC

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the sensitivity of dose-mass-histogram (DMH) due to anatomical changes of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Eight patients undergoing RT treatment for HNSCC were scanned during the third and sixth week of RT. These second (CT2) and third (CT3) CTs were co-registered to the planning CT (CT1). Contours were propagated via deformable registration from CT1 and doses were re-calculated. DMHs were extracted for each CT set. DMH sensitivity was assessed by dose-mass indices (DMIs), which represent the dose delivered to a certain mass of and anatomical structure. DMIs included: dose to 98%, 95% and 2% of the target masses (PTV1, PTV2, and PTV3) and organs-at-risk (OARs): cord DMI2%, brainstem DMI2%, left- and right-parotid DMI2% and DMI50%, and mandible DMI2%. A two-tailed paired t-test was used to compare changes to DMIs in CT2 and CT3 with respect to CT1 (CT2/CT1 and CT3/CT1). Results: Changes to DMHs were found for all OARs and PTVs, but they were significant only for the PTVs. Maximum dose to PTVs increased significantly for CT2/CT1 in all three PTVs, but CT3/CT1 changes were only significantly different for PTV1 and PTV2. Dose coverage to the three PTVs was also significantly different, DMI98% wasmore » lower for both CT2/CT1 and CT3/CT1. DMI95% was significantly lower for PTV1 for CT2/CT1, PTV2 for CT2/CT1 and CT3/CT1, and PTV3 for CT3/CT1. Conclusion: Changes in anatomy significantly change dose-mass coverage for the planning targets, making it necessary to re-plan in order to maintain the therapeutic goals. Maximum dose to the PTVs increase significantly as RT progresses, which may not be problematic as long as the high dose remains in the gross tumor volume. Doses to OARs were minimally affected and the differences were not significant.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649045
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOSENSITIVITY; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

De Ornelas-Couto, M, Bossart, E, Elsayyad, N, Samuels, M, Takita, C, and Mihaylov, I. SU-F-T-454: Dose-Mass-Histogram Sensitivity to Anatomical Changes During Radiotherapy for HNSCC. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956639.
De Ornelas-Couto, M, Bossart, E, Elsayyad, N, Samuels, M, Takita, C, & Mihaylov, I. SU-F-T-454: Dose-Mass-Histogram Sensitivity to Anatomical Changes During Radiotherapy for HNSCC. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956639.
De Ornelas-Couto, M, Bossart, E, Elsayyad, N, Samuels, M, Takita, C, and Mihaylov, I. 2016. "SU-F-T-454: Dose-Mass-Histogram Sensitivity to Anatomical Changes During Radiotherapy for HNSCC". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956639.
@article{osti_22649045,
title = {SU-F-T-454: Dose-Mass-Histogram Sensitivity to Anatomical Changes During Radiotherapy for HNSCC},
author = {De Ornelas-Couto, M and Bossart, E and Elsayyad, N and Samuels, M and Takita, C and Mihaylov, I},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To determine the sensitivity of dose-mass-histogram (DMH) due to anatomical changes of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Eight patients undergoing RT treatment for HNSCC were scanned during the third and sixth week of RT. These second (CT2) and third (CT3) CTs were co-registered to the planning CT (CT1). Contours were propagated via deformable registration from CT1 and doses were re-calculated. DMHs were extracted for each CT set. DMH sensitivity was assessed by dose-mass indices (DMIs), which represent the dose delivered to a certain mass of and anatomical structure. DMIs included: dose to 98%, 95% and 2% of the target masses (PTV1, PTV2, and PTV3) and organs-at-risk (OARs): cord DMI2%, brainstem DMI2%, left- and right-parotid DMI2% and DMI50%, and mandible DMI2%. A two-tailed paired t-test was used to compare changes to DMIs in CT2 and CT3 with respect to CT1 (CT2/CT1 and CT3/CT1). Results: Changes to DMHs were found for all OARs and PTVs, but they were significant only for the PTVs. Maximum dose to PTVs increased significantly for CT2/CT1 in all three PTVs, but CT3/CT1 changes were only significantly different for PTV1 and PTV2. Dose coverage to the three PTVs was also significantly different, DMI98% was lower for both CT2/CT1 and CT3/CT1. DMI95% was significantly lower for PTV1 for CT2/CT1, PTV2 for CT2/CT1 and CT3/CT1, and PTV3 for CT3/CT1. Conclusion: Changes in anatomy significantly change dose-mass coverage for the planning targets, making it necessary to re-plan in order to maintain the therapeutic goals. Maximum dose to the PTVs increase significantly as RT progresses, which may not be problematic as long as the high dose remains in the gross tumor volume. Doses to OARs were minimally affected and the differences were not significant.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956639},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the anatomical changes and associated dosimetric consequences to the pharyngeal constrictor (PC) that occurs during head and neck radiotherapy (H&N RT). Methods: A cohort of 13 oro-pharyngeal cancer patients, who had daily CBCT’s for localization, was retrospectively studied. On every 5th CBCT, PC was manually delineated by a radiation oncologist. The anterior-posterior PC thickness was measured at the C3 level. Delivered dose to PC was estimated by calculating daily doses on CBCT’s, and accumulating to corresponding planning CT images. For accumulation, a parameter-optimized B- spline-based deformable image registration algorithm (Elastix) was used, in conjunction with an energy-massmore » mapping dose transfer algorithm. Mean and maximum dose (Dmean, Dmax) to PC was determined and compared with corresponding planned quantities. Results: The mean (±standard deviation) volume increase (ΔV) and thickness increase (Δt) over the course of 35 total fractions were 54±33% (11.9±7.6 cc), and 63±39% (2.9±1.9 mm), respectively. The resultant cumulative mean dose increase from planned dose to PC (ΔDmean) was 1.4±1.3% (0.9±0.8 Gy), while the maximum dose increase (ΔDmax) was 0.0±1.6% (0.0±1.1 Gy). Patients with adaptive replanning (n=6) showed a smaller mean dose increase than those without (n=7); 0.5±0.2% (0.3±0.1 Gy) vs. 2.2±1.4% (1.4±0.9 Gy). There was a statistically significant (p<0.0001) strong correlation between ΔDmean and Δt (Pearson coefficient r=0.78), and a moderate-to-strong correlation (r=0.52) between ΔDmean and ΔV. Correlation between ΔDmean and weight loss ΔW (r=0.1), as well as ΔV and ΔW (r=0.2) were negligible. Conclusion: Patients were found to undergo considerable anatomical changes to pharyngeal constrictor during H&N RT, resulting in non-negligible dose deviations from intended dose. Results are indicative that pharyngeal constrictor thickness, measured at C3 level, is a good predictor for the dose change to the organ. Daily deformable registration and dose accumulation provide a reliable means to assess important anatomical and dosimetric changes to pharyngeal constrictor occurring during treatment. This work was supported in part by a research grant from Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA.« less
  • Purpose: To develop a novel method to monitor external anatomical changes in head and neck cancer patients in order to help guide adaptive radiotherapy decisions. Methods: The method, developed in MATLAB, reveals internal anatomical changes based on variations observed in external anatomy. Weekly kV-CBCT scans from 11 Head and neck patients were retrospectively analyzed. The pre-processing step first corrects each CBCT for artifacts and removes pixels from the immobilization mask to produce an accurate external contour of the patient’s skin. After registering the CBCTs to the initial planning CT, the external contours from each CBCT (CBCTn) are transferred to themore » first week — reference — CBCT{sub 1}. Contour radii, defined as the distances between an external contour and the central pixel of each CBCT slice, are calculated for each scan at angular increments of 1 degree. The changes in external anatomy are then quantified by the difference in radial distance between the external contours of CBCT1 and CBCTn. The radial difference is finally displayed on a 2D intensity map (angle vs radial distance difference) in order to highlight regions of interests with significant changes. Results: The 2D radial difference maps provided qualitative and quantitative information, such as the location and the magnitude of external contour divergences and the rate at which these deviations occur. With this method, anatomical changes due to tumor volume shrinkage and patient weight loss were clearly identified and could be correlated with the under-dosage of targets or over-dosage of OARs. Conclusion: This novel method provides an efficient tool to visualize 3D external anatomical modification on a single 2D map. It quickly pinpoints the location of differences in anatomy during the course of radiotherapy, which can help determine if a treatment plan needs to be adapted.« less
  • Purpose: Dose-volume-histogram (DVH) is widely used for plan evaluation in radiation treatment. The concept of dose-mass-histogram (DMH) is expected to provide a more representative description as it accounts for heterogeneity in tissue density. This study is intended to assess the difference between DVH and DMH for evaluating treatment planning quality. Methods: 12 lung cancer treatment plans were exported from the treatment planning system. DVHs for the planning target volume (PTV), the normal lung and other structures of interest were calculated. DMHs were calculated in a similar way as DVHs expect that the voxel density converted from the CT number wasmore » used in tallying the dose histogram bins. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was calculated based on voxel volume and mass, respectively. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) in relation to the EUD was calculated for the normal lung to provide quantitative comparison of DVHs and DMHs for evaluating the radiobiological effect. Results: Large differences were observed between DVHs and DMHs for lungs and PTVs. For PTVs with dense tumor cores, DMHs are higher than DVHs due to larger mass weighing in the high dose conformal core regions. For the normal lungs, DMHs can either be higher or lower than DVHs depending on the target location within the lung. When the target is close to the lower lung, DMHs show higher values than DVHs because the lower lung has higher density than the central portion or the upper lung. DMHs are lower than DVHs for targets in the upper lung. The calculated NTCPs showed a large range of difference between DVHs and DMHs. Conclusion: The heterogeneity of lung can be well considered using DMH for evaluating target coverage and normal lung pneumonitis. Further studies are warranted to quantify the benefits of DMH over DVH for plan quality evaluation.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the severity of genitourinary (GU) toxicity in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to explore factors that might affect the severity of GU toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 Japanese men with prostate cancer underwent {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Mean (SD) dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 (0.7) Gy per fraction of HDR. After 5 fractions of HDR treatment, EBRT with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administrated. The urethral volume receiving 1-15 Gy per fraction in HDR brachytherapymore » (V1-V15) and the dose to at least 5-100% of urethral volume in HDR brachytherapy (D5-D100) were compared between patients with Grade 3 toxicity and those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Prostate volume, patient age, and International Prostate Symptom Score were also compared between the two groups. Results: Of the 100 patients, 6 displayed Grade 3 acute GU toxicity, and 12 displayed Grade 3 late GU toxicity. Regarding acute GU toxicity, values of V1, V2, V3, and V4 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Regarding late GU toxicity, values of D70, D80, V12, and V13 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Conclusions: The severity of GU toxicity in HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT for prostate cancer was relatively high. The volume of prostatic urethra was associated with grade of acute GU toxicity, and urethral dose was associated with grade of late GU toxicity.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the rectal tolerance to Grade 2 rectal bleeding after I-125 seed brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), based on the rectal dose-volume histogram. Methods and Materials: A total of 458 consecutive patients with stages T1 to T3 prostate cancer received combined modality treatment consisting of I-125 seed implantation followed by EBRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles. The prescribed doses of brachytherapy and EBRT were 100 Gy and 45 Gy in 25 fractions, respectively. The rectal dosimetric factors were analyzed for rectal volumes receiving >100 Gy and >150 Gy (R100 and R150) during brachytherapy and formore » rectal volumes receiving >30 Gy to 40 Gy (V30-V40) during EBRT therapy in 373 patients for whom datasets were available. The patients were followed from 21 to 72 months (median, 45 months) after the I-125 seed implantation. Results: Forty-four patients (9.7%) developed Grade 2 rectal bleeding. On multivariate analysis, age (p = 0.014), R100 (p = 0.002), and V30 (p = 0.001) were identified as risk factors for Grade 2 rectal bleeding. The rectal bleeding rate increased as the R100 increased: 5.0% (2/40 patients) for 0 ml; 7.5% (20/267 patients) for >0 to 0.5 ml; 11.0% (11/100 patients) for >0.5 to 1 ml; 17.9% (5/28 patients) for >1 to 1.5 ml; and 27.3% (6/22 patients) for >1.5 ml (p = 0.014). Grade 2 rectal bleeding developed in 6.4% (12/188) of patients with a V30 {<=}35% and in 14.1% (26/185) of patients with a V30 >35% (p = 0.02). When these dose-volume parameters were considered in combination, the Grade 2 rectal bleeding rate was 4.2% (5/120 patients) for a R100 {<=}0.5 ml and a V30 {<=}35%, whereas it was 22.4% (13/58 patients) for R100 of >0.5 ml and V30 of >35%. Conclusion: The risk of rectal bleeding was found to be significantly volume-dependent in patients with prostate cancer who received combined modality treatment. Rectal dose-volume analysis is a practical method for predicting the risk of development of Grade 2 rectal bleeding.« less