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Title: SU-F-T-453: Improved Head and Neck SBRT Treatment Planning Using PlanIQ

Abstract

Purpose: Treatment planning for Head and Neck(HN) re-irradiation is a challenge because of ablative doses to target volume and strict critical structure constraints. PlanIQ(Sun Nuclear Corporation) can assess the feasibility of clinical goals and quantitatively measure plan quality. Here, we assess whether incorporation of PlanIQ in our SBRT treatment planning process can improve plan quality and planning efficiency. Methods: From 2013–2015, 35 patients (29 retrospective, 6 prospective) with recurrent HN tumors were treated with SBRT using VMAT treatment plans. The median prescription dose was 45 Gy in 5 fractions. We retrospectively reviewed the treatment plans and physician directives of our first 29 patients and generated score functions of the dosimetric goals used in our practice and obtained a baseline histogram. We then re-optimized 12 plans that had potential to further reduce organs-at-risk (OAR) doses according to PlanIQ feasibility DVH and plan quality analysis and compared them to the original plans. We applied our new PlanIQ-assisted planning process for our 6 most recently treated patients and evaluated the plan quality and planning efficiency. Results: The mean plan quality metric(PQM) and feasibility adjusted PQM(APQM) scores of our initial 29 treatment plans were 77.1±13.1 and 88.7±11.9, respectively (0–100 scale). The PQM and APQMmore » scores for the 12 optimized plans improved from 75.9±11.0 and 85.1±10.2 to 80.7±9.3 and 90.2±8.0, respectively (p<0.005). Using our newly developed PlanIQ-assisted planning process, the PQM and APQM scores for the 6 most recently treated patients were 93.6±6.5 and 99.1±0.6, respectively. The planning goals were more straightforward to minimize OAR doses during optimization, thus less planning and revision time were used than before. Conclusion: PlanIQ has the potential to provide achievable planning goals and also improve plan quality and planning efficiency.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649044
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; EFFICIENCY; HEAD; NECK; PATIENTS; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Wang, H, Wang, C, Phan, J, Tung, S, and Chi, P. SU-F-T-453: Improved Head and Neck SBRT Treatment Planning Using PlanIQ. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956638.
Wang, H, Wang, C, Phan, J, Tung, S, & Chi, P. SU-F-T-453: Improved Head and Neck SBRT Treatment Planning Using PlanIQ. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956638.
Wang, H, Wang, C, Phan, J, Tung, S, and Chi, P. 2016. "SU-F-T-453: Improved Head and Neck SBRT Treatment Planning Using PlanIQ". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956638.
@article{osti_22649044,
title = {SU-F-T-453: Improved Head and Neck SBRT Treatment Planning Using PlanIQ},
author = {Wang, H and Wang, C and Phan, J and Tung, S and Chi, P},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Treatment planning for Head and Neck(HN) re-irradiation is a challenge because of ablative doses to target volume and strict critical structure constraints. PlanIQ(Sun Nuclear Corporation) can assess the feasibility of clinical goals and quantitatively measure plan quality. Here, we assess whether incorporation of PlanIQ in our SBRT treatment planning process can improve plan quality and planning efficiency. Methods: From 2013–2015, 35 patients (29 retrospective, 6 prospective) with recurrent HN tumors were treated with SBRT using VMAT treatment plans. The median prescription dose was 45 Gy in 5 fractions. We retrospectively reviewed the treatment plans and physician directives of our first 29 patients and generated score functions of the dosimetric goals used in our practice and obtained a baseline histogram. We then re-optimized 12 plans that had potential to further reduce organs-at-risk (OAR) doses according to PlanIQ feasibility DVH and plan quality analysis and compared them to the original plans. We applied our new PlanIQ-assisted planning process for our 6 most recently treated patients and evaluated the plan quality and planning efficiency. Results: The mean plan quality metric(PQM) and feasibility adjusted PQM(APQM) scores of our initial 29 treatment plans were 77.1±13.1 and 88.7±11.9, respectively (0–100 scale). The PQM and APQM scores for the 12 optimized plans improved from 75.9±11.0 and 85.1±10.2 to 80.7±9.3 and 90.2±8.0, respectively (p<0.005). Using our newly developed PlanIQ-assisted planning process, the PQM and APQM scores for the 6 most recently treated patients were 93.6±6.5 and 99.1±0.6, respectively. The planning goals were more straightforward to minimize OAR doses during optimization, thus less planning and revision time were used than before. Conclusion: PlanIQ has the potential to provide achievable planning goals and also improve plan quality and planning efficiency.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956638},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: The severe reduction of salivary function (xerostomia) is a common complication after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Consequently, guidelines to ensure adequate function based on parotid gland tolerance dose-volume parameters have been suggested by the QUANTEC group and by Ortholan et al. We perform a validation test of these guidelines against a prospectively collected dataset and compared with a previously published dataset. Methods and Materials: Whole-mouth stimulated salivary flow data from 66 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) were measured, and treatment planning data were abstracted. Flow measurements were collected from 50more » patients at 3 months, and 60 patients at 12-month follow-up. Previously published data from a second institution, Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL), were used for comparison. A logistic model was used to describe the incidence of Grade 4 xerostomia as a function of the mean dose of the spared parotid gland. The rate of correctly predicting the lack of xerostomia (negative predictive value [NPV]) was computed for both the QUANTEC constraints and Ortholan et al. recommendation to constrain the total volume of both glands receiving more than 40 Gy to less than 33%. Results: Both datasets showed a rate of xerostomia of less than 20% when the mean dose to the least-irradiated parotid gland is kept to less than 20 Gy. Logistic model parameters for the incidence of xerostomia at 12 months after therapy, based on the least-irradiated gland, were D{sub 50} = 32.4 Gy and and {gamma} = 0.97. NPVs for QUANTEC guideline were 94% (BCCA data), and 90% (WUSTL data). For Ortholan et al. guideline NPVs were 85% (BCCA) and 86% (WUSTL). Conclusion: These data confirm that the QUANTEC guideline effectively avoids xerostomia, and this is somewhat more effective than constraints on the volume receiving more than 40 Gy.« less
  • Purpose: Accurate delineation of organs at risk (OARs) is a precondition for intensity modulated radiation therapy. However, manual delineation of OARs is time consuming and prone to high interobserver variability. Because of image artifacts and low image contrast between different structures, however, the number of available approaches for autosegmentation of structures in the head-neck area is still rather low. In this project, a new approach for automated segmentation of head-neck CT images that combine the robustness of multiatlas-based segmentation with the flexibility of geodesic active contours and the prior knowledge provided by statistical appearance models is presented. Methods: The presentedmore » approach is using an atlas-based segmentation approach in combination with label fusion in order to initialize a segmentation pipeline that is based on using statistical appearance models and geodesic active contours. An anatomically correct approximation of the segmentation result provided by atlas-based segmentation acts as a starting point for an iterative refinement of this approximation. The final segmentation result is based on using model to image registration and geodesic active contours, which are mutually influencing each other. Results: 18 CT images in combination with manually segmented labels of parotid glands and brainstem were used in a leave-one-out cross validation scheme in order to evaluate the presented approach. For this purpose, 50 different statistical appearance models have been created and used for segmentation. Dice coefficient (DC), mean absolute distance and max. Hausdorff distance between the autosegmentation results and expert segmentations were calculated. An average Dice coefficient of DC = 0.81 (right parotid gland), DC = 0.84 (left parotid gland), and DC = 0.86 (brainstem) could be achieved. Conclusions: The presented framework provides accurate segmentation results for three important structures in the head neck area. Compared to a segmentation approach based on using multiple atlases in combination with label fusion, the proposed hybrid approach provided more accurate results within a clinically acceptable amount of time.« less
  • Purpose: Head and neck radiotherapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires the images to be reliably registered with treatment planning CT. Acquiring PET/CT in treatment position is problematic, and in practice for some patients it may be beneficial to use diagnostic PET/CT for radiotherapy planning. Therefore, the aim of this study was first to quantify the image registration accuracy of PET/CT to radiotherapy CT and, second, to assess whether PET/CT acquired in diagnostic position can be registered to planning CT. Methods and Materials: Positron emission tomography/CT acquired in diagnostic and treatment position for five patients with head andmore » neck cancer was registered to radiotherapy planning CT using both rigid and nonrigid image registration. The root mean squared error for each method was calculated from a set of anatomic landmarks marked by four independent observers. Results: Nonrigid and rigid registration errors for treatment position PET/CT to planning CT were 2.77 {+-} 0.80 mm and 4.96 {+-} 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. Applying the nonrigid registration to diagnostic position PET/CT produced a more accurate match to the planning CT than rigid registration of treatment position PET/CT (3.20 {+-} 1.22 mm and 4.96 {+-} 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.012). Conclusions: Nonrigid registration provides a more accurate registration of head and neck PET/CT to treatment planning CT than rigid registration. In addition, nonrigid registration of PET/CT acquired with patients in a standardized, diagnostic position can provide images registered to planning CT with greater accuracy than a rigid registration of PET/CT images acquired in treatment position. This may allow greater flexibility in the timing of PET/CT for head and neck cancer patients due to undergo radiotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: To define the best threshold for tumor volume delineation of the (18) fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}FDG-PET) signal for radiotherapy treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: In 25 patients with head-and-neck cancer, CT-based gross tumor volume (GTV{sub CT}) was delineated. After PET-CT image fusion, window level (L) was adapted to best fit the GTV{sub CT}, and GTV{sub PET} was delineated. Tumor maximum (S) and background uptake (B) were measured, and the threshold of the background-subtracted tumor maximum uptake (THR) was used for PET signal segmentation. Gross tumor volumes were expandedmore » to planning target volumes (PTVs) and analyzed. Results: The mean value of S was 40 kBq/mL, S/B ratio was 16, and THR was 26%. The THR correlated with S (r = -0.752), but no correlation between THR and the S/B ratio was seen (r = -0.382). In 77% of cases, S was >30 kBq/mL, and in 23% it was {<=}30 kBq/mL, with a mean THR of 21.4% and 41.6%, respectively (p < 0.001). Using PTV{sub PET} in radiotherapy treatment planning resulted in a reduced PTV in 72% of cases, while covering 88.2% of GTV{sub CT}, comparable to the percentage of GTV{sub PET} covered by PTV{sub CT} (p = 0.15). Conclusions: A case-specific PET signal threshold is optimal in PET-based radiotherapy treatment planning. Signal gating using a THR of 20% in tumors with S >30% {+-} 1.6% kBq/mL and 40% in tumors with S {<=}30% {+-} 1.6% kBq/mL is suitable.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the utility of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) early after surgical resection and before postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We studied a prospective cohort of 91 consecutive patients referred for postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy after complete surgical resection. Tumor histologies included 62 squamous cell and 29 non-squamous cell cancers. Median time between surgery and postoperative PET/CT was 28 days (range, 13-75 days). Findings suspicious for persistent/recurrent cancer or distant metastasis were biopsied. Correlation was made with changes in patient care. Results: Based on PET/CT findings, 24 patients (26.4%) underwent biopsy of suspicious sites. Threemore » patients with suspicious findings did not undergo biopsy because the abnormalities were not easily accessible. Eleven (45.8%) biopsies were positive for cancer. Treatment was changed for 14 (15.4%) patients (11 positive biopsy and 3 nonbiopsied patients) as a result. Treatment changes included abandonment of radiation therapy and switching to palliative chemotherapy or hospice care (4), increasing the radiation therapy dose (6), extending the radiation therapy treatment volume and increasing the dose (1), additional surgery (2), and adding palliative chemotherapy to palliative radiation therapy (1). Treatment for recurrent cancer and primary skin cancer were significant predictors of having a biopsy-proven, treatment-changing positive PET/CT (p < 0.03). Conclusions: Even with an expectedly high rate of false positive PET/CT scans in this early postoperative period, PET/CT changed patient management in a relatively large proportion of patients. PET/CT can be recommended in the postoperative, preradiation therapy setting with the understanding that treatment-altering PET/CT findings should be biopsied for confirmation.« less