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Title: SU-F-T-375: Optimization of a New Co-60 Machine for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: A Monte Carlo Characterization Study

Abstract

Purpose: To provide a wide range of dose output for intensity modulation purposes while minimizing the beam penumbra for a new rotating cobalt therapy system. The highest dose rate needs to be maximized as well. Methods: The GEPTS Monte Carlo system is used to calculate the dose distribution from each tested Co-60 head for a wide range of field sizes (1×1 to 40×40 cm2). This includes the transport of photons (and secondary electrons) from the source through the collimation system (primary collimator, Y and × jaws, and MLCs) and finally in the water phantom. Photon transport includes Compton scattering (with electron binding effect), Rayleigh scattering, Photoelectric effect (with detailed simulation of fluorescence x-rays). Calculations are done for different system designs to reduce geometric penumbra and provide dose output modulation. Results: Taking into account different clinical requirements, the choice of a movable head (SAD = 70 to 80 cm) is made. The 120-leaf MLC (6-cm thick) entrance is at 32 cm from the bottom of the source (to reduce penumbra while allowing larger patient clearance). Three system designs (refereed here as S1–3) were simulated with different effective source sizes (2mm, 10mm and 17mm diameter). The effective point source is at mid-heightmore » of the 25-mm-long source. Using a 12000-Ci source, the designed Co-60 head can deliver a wide range of dose outputs (0.5 − 4 Gy/mn). A dose output of 2.2 Gy/mn can be delivered for a 10cm × 10cm field size with 1-cm penumbra using a 10mm effective source. Conclusion: A new 60Co-based VMAT machine is designed to meet different clinical requirements in term of dose output and beam penumbra. Outcomes from this study can be used for the design of 60Co machines for which a renewed interest is seen.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648973
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; COBALT 60; DESIGN; DOSE RATES; HEAD; MONTE CARLO METHOD; POINT SOURCES; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIOTHERAPY; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Chibani, O, Fan, J, Tahanout, F, Eldib, A, and Ma, C. SU-F-T-375: Optimization of a New Co-60 Machine for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: A Monte Carlo Characterization Study. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956560.
Chibani, O, Fan, J, Tahanout, F, Eldib, A, & Ma, C. SU-F-T-375: Optimization of a New Co-60 Machine for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: A Monte Carlo Characterization Study. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956560.
Chibani, O, Fan, J, Tahanout, F, Eldib, A, and Ma, C. Wed . "SU-F-T-375: Optimization of a New Co-60 Machine for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: A Monte Carlo Characterization Study". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956560.
@article{osti_22648973,
title = {SU-F-T-375: Optimization of a New Co-60 Machine for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: A Monte Carlo Characterization Study},
author = {Chibani, O and Fan, J and Tahanout, F and Eldib, A and Ma, C},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To provide a wide range of dose output for intensity modulation purposes while minimizing the beam penumbra for a new rotating cobalt therapy system. The highest dose rate needs to be maximized as well. Methods: The GEPTS Monte Carlo system is used to calculate the dose distribution from each tested Co-60 head for a wide range of field sizes (1×1 to 40×40 cm2). This includes the transport of photons (and secondary electrons) from the source through the collimation system (primary collimator, Y and × jaws, and MLCs) and finally in the water phantom. Photon transport includes Compton scattering (with electron binding effect), Rayleigh scattering, Photoelectric effect (with detailed simulation of fluorescence x-rays). Calculations are done for different system designs to reduce geometric penumbra and provide dose output modulation. Results: Taking into account different clinical requirements, the choice of a movable head (SAD = 70 to 80 cm) is made. The 120-leaf MLC (6-cm thick) entrance is at 32 cm from the bottom of the source (to reduce penumbra while allowing larger patient clearance). Three system designs (refereed here as S1–3) were simulated with different effective source sizes (2mm, 10mm and 17mm diameter). The effective point source is at mid-height of the 25-mm-long source. Using a 12000-Ci source, the designed Co-60 head can deliver a wide range of dose outputs (0.5 − 4 Gy/mn). A dose output of 2.2 Gy/mn can be delivered for a 10cm × 10cm field size with 1-cm penumbra using a 10mm effective source. Conclusion: A new 60Co-based VMAT machine is designed to meet different clinical requirements in term of dose output and beam penumbra. Outcomes from this study can be used for the design of 60Co machines for which a renewed interest is seen.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956560},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatmentmore » planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.« less
  • Purpose: Recent clinical studies have shown a correlation between radiation dose to the thoracic vertebral bodies (TVB) and the development of hematologic toxicity (HT) in patients receiving chemoradiation (CRT) for lung cancer (LuCa). The feasibility of a bone-marrow sparing (BMS) approach in this group of patients is unknown. We hypothesized that radiation dose to the TVB can be reduced with an intensity modulated radiation therapy(IMRT)/volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy(VMAT) without affecting plan quality. Methods: We identified LuCa cases treated with curative intent CRT using IMRT/VMAT from 4/2009 to 2/2015. The TVBs from T1–T10 were retrospectively contoured. No constraints were placed onmore » the TVB structure initially. A subset were re-planned with BMS-IMRT/VMAT with an objective or reducing the mean TVB dose to <23 Gy. The following data were collected on the initial and BMS plans: mean dose to planning target volume (PTV), lungs-PTV, esophagus, heart; lung V20; cord max dose. Pairwise comparisons were performed using the signed rank test. Results: 94 cases received CRT with IMRT/VMAT. We selected 11 cases (7 IMRT, 4 VMAT) with a range of initial mean TVB doses (median 35.7 Gy, range 18.9–41.4 Gy). Median prescription dose was 60 Gy. BMS-IMRT/VMAT significantly reduced the mean TVB dose by a median of 10.2 Gy (range, 1.0–16.7 Gy, p=0.001) and reduced the cord max dose by 2.9 Gy (p=0.014). BMS-IMRT/VMAT had no impact on lung mean (median +17 cGy, p=0.700), lung V20 (median +0.5%, p=0.898), esophagus mean (median +13 cGy, p=1.000) or heart mean (median +16 cGy, p=0.365). PTV-mean dose was not affected by BMS-IMRT/VMAT (median +13 cGy, p=0.653). Conclusion: BMS-IMRT/VMAT was able to significantly reduce radiation dose to the TVB without compromising plan quality. Prospective evaluation of BMS-IMRT/VMAT in patients receiving CRT for LuCa is warranted to determine if this approach results in clinically significant reductions in HT.« less
  • Purpose: To compare the treatment plan quality and dose gradient near the hippocampus between VMAT (RapidArc) and IMRT delivery techniques for whole brain radiation therapy. Methods: Fifteen patients were evaluated in this retrospective study. All treatments were planned on Varian Eclipse TPS, using 3-Arc VMAT and 9-Field IMRT, following NRG Oncology protocol NRG-CC001 guidelines evaluated by a single radiation oncologist. Prescribed doses in all plans were 30 Gy delivered over 10 fractions normalized to a minimum of 100% of the dose covering 95% of the target volume. Identical contour sets and dose-volume constraints following protocol guidelines were also applied inmore » all plans. A paired t-test analysis was used to compare VMAT and IMRT plans. Results: NRG-CC001 protocol dose-volume constraints were met for all VMAT and IMRT plans. For the planning target volume (PTV), the average values for D2% and D98% were 6% lower and 4% higher in VMAT than in IMRT, respectively. The average mean and maximum hippocampus doses in Gy for VMAT vs IMRT plans were (11.85±0.81 vs. 12.24±0.56, p=0.10) and (16.27±0.78 vs. 16.59±0.71, p=0.24), respectively. In VMAT, the average mean and maximum chiasm doses were 3% and 1% higher than in IMRT plans, respectively. For the left optic nerve, the average mean and maximum doses were 10% and 5% higher in VMAT than in IMRT plans, respectively. These values were 12% and 3% for the right optic nerve. The average percentage of dose gradient around the hippocampus in the 0–5mm and 5–10mm abutted regions for VMAT vs. IMRT were (4.42%±2.22% /mm vs. 3.95%±2.61% /mm, p=0.43) and (4.54%±1.50% /mm vs. 4.39%±1.28% /mm, p=0.73), respectively. Conclusion: VMAT plans can achieve higher hippocampus sparing with a faster dose fall-off than IMRT plans. Though statistically insignificant, VMAT offers better PTV coverage with slightly higher doses to OARs.« less
  • Purpose: This study evaluates the dosimetric differences using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients previously treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy IMRT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in early stage lung cancer. Methods: We evaluated 9 consecutive medically inoperable lung cancer patients at the start of the SBRT program who were treated with IMRT from November 2010 to October 2011. These patients were treated using 6 MV energy. The 9 cases were then re-planned with VMAT performed with arc therapy using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) energy with the same organs at risk (OARS) constraints. Data collected formore » the treatment plans included target coverage, beam on time, dose to OARS and gamma pass rate. Results: Five patients were T1N0 and four patients were T2N0 with all tumors less than 5 cm. The average GTV was 13.02 cm3 (0.83–40.87) and average PTV was 44.65 cm3 (14.06–118.08). The IMRT plans had a mean of 7.2 angles (6–9) and 5.4 minutes (3.6–11.1) per plan. The VMAT plans had a mean of 2.8 arcs (2–3) and 4.0 minutes (2.2–6.0) per plan. VMAT had slightly more target coverage than IMRT with average increase in D95 of 2.68% (1.24–5.73) and D99 of 3.65% (0.88–8.77). VMAT produced lower doses to all OARs. The largest reductions were in maximum doses to the spinal cord with an average reduction of 24.1%, esophagus with an average reduction of 22.1%, and lung with an average reduction in the V20 of 16.3% The mean gamma pass rate was 99.8% (99.2–100) at 3 mm and 3% for VMAT with comparable values for IMRT. Conclusion: These findings suggest that using VMAT for SBRT in early stage lung cancer is superior to IMRT in terms of dose coverage, OAR dose and a lower treatment delivery time with a similar gamma pass rate.« less
  • Purpose: Pencil-beam or superposition-convolution type dose calculation algorithms are routinely used in inverse plan optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). However, due to their limited accuracy in some challenging cases, e.g. lung, the resulting dose may lose its optimality after being recomputed using an accurate algorithm, e.g. Monte Carlo (MC). It is the objective of this study to evaluate the feasibility and advantages of a new method to include MC in the treatment planning process. Methods: We developed a scheme to iteratively perform MC-based beamlet dose calculations and plan optimization. In the MC stage, a GPU-based dose engine wasmore » used and the particle number sampled from a beamlet was proportional to its optimized fluence from the previous step. We tested this scheme in four lung cancer IMRT cases. For each case, the original plan dose, plan dose re-computed by MC, and dose optimized by our scheme were obtained. Clinically relevant dosimetric quantities in these three plans were compared. Results: Although the original plan achieved a satisfactory PDV dose coverage, after re-computing doses using MC method, it was found that the PTV D95% were reduced by 4.60%–6.67%. After re-optimizing these cases with our scheme, the PTV coverage was improved to the same level as in the original plan, while the critical OAR coverages were maintained to clinically acceptable levels. Regarding the computation time, it took on average 144 sec per case using only one GPU card, including both MC-based beamlet dose calculation and treatment plan optimization. Conclusion: The achieved dosimetric gains and high computational efficiency indicate the feasibility and advantages of the proposed MC-based IMRT optimization method. Comprehensive validations in more patient cases are in progress.« less