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Title: SU-F-T-374: Dosimetric Effects of Irradiation Through a Bilateral Hip Prosthesis in a MRI Linac

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the interface effects when irradiating through a hip prosthesis in the presence of an orthogonal 1.5 T magnetic field using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: A 20×20×38 cm virtual phantom with two 5×5×5 cm sections of bilateral titanium hip prosthesis was created in GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm (GPUMCD, Elekta AB, Stockholm Sweden). The lateral prosthesis spacing was based on a representative patient CT scan. A treatment SAD of 143.5 cm was chosen, corresponding to the Elekta AB MRI Linac and the beam energy distribution was sampled from a histogram representing the true MRI Linac spectrum. A magnetic field of 1.5 T was applied perpendicular to the plane of irradiation. Dose was calculated, in voxels of side 1 mm, for 2×2, 5×5, and 10×10 cm treatment field sizes with normal beam incidence (gantry at 90° or 270°) and at 5° and 10° from normal, representing the range of incidence through the bilateral prosthesis. Results: With magnetic field ON (B-On) and normal beam incidence the backscatter dose at the interfaces of proximal and distal implants is reduced for all the field sizes compared to the magnetic field OFF (B-Off) case. The absolute reduction in doses at the interface wasmore » in the range of 12.93% to 13.16% for the proximal implant and 13.57% to 16.12% for the distal implant. Similarly for the oblique incidences of 5o and 10o the dose in the plane adjacent to the prosthetic implants is lower when the magnetic field is ON. Conclusion: The dosimetric effects of irradiating through a hip prosthesis in the presence of a transverse magnetic field have been determined using MC simulation. The backscatter dose reduction translates into significantly lower hot spots at the prosthetic interfaces, which are otherwise substantially high in the absence of the magnetic field. This project was supported through funding provided by ElektaTM.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Center, Toronto (Canada)
  2. (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648972
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BEAMS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IMPLANTS; INTERFACES; IRRADIATION; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NMR IMAGING; PROSTHESES; RADIATION DOSES

Citation Formats

Wronski, M, Sarfehnia, A, Sahgal, A, Keller, B, University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, and Ahmad, S. SU-F-T-374: Dosimetric Effects of Irradiation Through a Bilateral Hip Prosthesis in a MRI Linac. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956559.
Wronski, M, Sarfehnia, A, Sahgal, A, Keller, B, University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, & Ahmad, S. SU-F-T-374: Dosimetric Effects of Irradiation Through a Bilateral Hip Prosthesis in a MRI Linac. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956559.
Wronski, M, Sarfehnia, A, Sahgal, A, Keller, B, University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, and Ahmad, S. 2016. "SU-F-T-374: Dosimetric Effects of Irradiation Through a Bilateral Hip Prosthesis in a MRI Linac". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956559.
@article{osti_22648972,
title = {SU-F-T-374: Dosimetric Effects of Irradiation Through a Bilateral Hip Prosthesis in a MRI Linac},
author = {Wronski, M and Sarfehnia, A and Sahgal, A and Keller, B and University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto and Ahmad, S},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate the interface effects when irradiating through a hip prosthesis in the presence of an orthogonal 1.5 T magnetic field using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: A 20×20×38 cm virtual phantom with two 5×5×5 cm sections of bilateral titanium hip prosthesis was created in GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm (GPUMCD, Elekta AB, Stockholm Sweden). The lateral prosthesis spacing was based on a representative patient CT scan. A treatment SAD of 143.5 cm was chosen, corresponding to the Elekta AB MRI Linac and the beam energy distribution was sampled from a histogram representing the true MRI Linac spectrum. A magnetic field of 1.5 T was applied perpendicular to the plane of irradiation. Dose was calculated, in voxels of side 1 mm, for 2×2, 5×5, and 10×10 cm treatment field sizes with normal beam incidence (gantry at 90° or 270°) and at 5° and 10° from normal, representing the range of incidence through the bilateral prosthesis. Results: With magnetic field ON (B-On) and normal beam incidence the backscatter dose at the interfaces of proximal and distal implants is reduced for all the field sizes compared to the magnetic field OFF (B-Off) case. The absolute reduction in doses at the interface was in the range of 12.93% to 13.16% for the proximal implant and 13.57% to 16.12% for the distal implant. Similarly for the oblique incidences of 5o and 10o the dose in the plane adjacent to the prosthetic implants is lower when the magnetic field is ON. Conclusion: The dosimetric effects of irradiating through a hip prosthesis in the presence of a transverse magnetic field have been determined using MC simulation. The backscatter dose reduction translates into significantly lower hot spots at the prosthetic interfaces, which are otherwise substantially high in the absence of the magnetic field. This project was supported through funding provided by ElektaTM.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956559},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • The purpose of this report is to communicate the observed advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in a patient with bilateral metallic hip prostheses. In this patient with early-stage low-risk disease, a dose of 74 Gy was planned in two phases-an initial 50 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles and an additional 24 Gy to the prostate alone. Each coplanar beam avoided the prosthesis in the beam's eye view. Using the same target expansions for each phase, IMRT and 3D-conformal radiotherapy (CRT) plans were compared for target coverage and inhomogeneity as well as dose to the bladder and rectum. Themore » results of the analysis demonstrated that IMRT provided superior target coverage with reduced dose to normal tissues for both individual phases of the treatment plan as well as for the composite treatment plan. The dose to the rectum was significantly reduced with the IMRT technique, with a composite V80 of 35% for the IMRT plan versus 70% for 3D-CRT plan. Similarly, the dose to the bladder was significantly reduced with a V80 of 9% versus 20%. Overall, various dosimetric parameters revealed the corresponding 3D-CRT plan would not have been acceptable. The results indicate significant success with IMRT in a clinical scenario where there were no curative alternatives for local treatment other than external beam radiotherapy. Therefore, definitive external beam radiation of prostate cancer patients with bilateral prosthesis is made feasible with IMRT. The work described herein may also have applicability to other groups of patients, such as those with gynecological or other pelvic malignancies.« less
  • Megavoltage photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is typically used in the treatment of prostate cancer at our institution. Approximately 1% to 2% of patients with prostate cancer have hip prostheses. The presence of the prosthesis usually complicates the planning process because of dose perturbation around the prosthesis, radiation attenuation through the prosthesis, and the introduction of computed tomography artifacts in the planning volume. In addition, hip prostheses are typically made of materials of high atomic number, which add uncertainty to the dosimetry of the prostate and critical organs in the planning volume. When the prosthesis is bilateral, treatment planning ismore » further complicated because only a limited number of beam angles can be used to avoid the prostheses. In this case study, we will report the observed advantages of using noncoplanar beams in the delivery of IMRT to a prostate cancer patient with bilateral hip prostheses. The treatment was planned for 75.6 Gy using a 7-field coplanar approach and a noncoplanar arrangement, with all fields avoiding entrance though the prostheses. Our results indicate that, compared with the coplanar plan, the noncoplanar plan delivers the prescribed dose to the target with a slightly better conformality and sparing of rectal tissue versus the coplanar plan.« less
  • Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to investigate the optimum oblique-beam arrangement for bilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer treatment in pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. Methods: A computed tomography dataset of bilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer case was selected for this retrospective study. A total of four beams (rightanterior- oblique [RAO], left-anterior-oblique [LAO], left-posterior-oblique [LPO], and right-posterior-oblique [RPO]) were selected for treatment planning. PBS plans were generated using multi-field-optimization technique for a total dose of 79.2 Gy[RBE] to be delivered in 44 fractions. Specifically, five different PBS plans were generated based on 2.5% ± 2 mm rangemore » uncertainty using five different beam arrangements (i)LAO+RAO+LPO+RPO, (ii)LAO+RAO, (iii)LPO+RPO, (iv)RAO+LPO, and (v)LAO+RPO. Each PBS plan was optimized by applying identical dose-volume constraints to the PTV, rectum, and bladder. Treatment plans were then compared based on the dose-volume histograms results. Results: The PTV coverage was found to be greater than 99% in all five plans. The homogeneity index (HI) was found to be almost identical (range, 0.03–0.04). The PTV mean dose was found to be comparable (range, 81.0–81.1 Gy[RBE]). For the rectum, the lowest mean dose (8.0 Gy[RBE]) and highest mean dose (31.1 Gy[RBE]) were found in RAO+LAO plan and LPO+RPO plan, respectively. LAO+RAO plan produced the most favorable dosimetric results of the rectum in the medium-dose region (V50) and high-dose region (V70). For the bladder, the lowest (5.0 Gy[RBE]) and highest mean dose (10.3 Gy[RBE]) were found in LPO+RPO plan and RAO+LAO plan, respectively. Other dosimetric results (V50 and V70) of the bladder were slightly better in LPO+RPO plan than in other plans. Conclusion: Dosimetric findings from this study suggest that two anterior-oblique proton beams arrangement (LAO+RAO) is a more favorable option with the possibility of reducing rectal dose significantly while maintaining comparable target coverage and acceptable bladder dose.« less
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