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Title: SU-F-T-359: Incorporating Dose Volume Histogram Prediction Into Auto-Planning for Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy in Rectal Cancer

Abstract

Purpose: To incorporate dose volume histogram (DVH) prediction into Auto-Planning for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning and investigate the benefit of this new technique for rectal cancer. Methods: Ninety clinically accepted VMAT plans for patients with rectal cancer were selected and trained in the RapidPlan for DVH prediction. Both internal and external validations were performed before implementing the prediction model. A new VMAT planning method (hybrid-VMAT) was created with combining the DVH prediction and Auto-Planning. For each new patient, the DVH will be predicted and individual DVH constrains will be obtained and were exported as the original optimization parameters to the Auto-Planning (Pinnacle3 treatment planning system, v9.10) for planning. A total of 20 rectal cancer patients previously treated with manual VMAT (manual-VMAT) plans were replanned using this new method. Dosimetric comparisons were performed between manual VMAT and new method plans. Results: Hybrid-VMAT shows similar PTV coverage to manual-VMAT in D2%, D98% and HI (p>0.05) and superior coverage in CI (p=0.000). For the bladder, the means of V40 and mean dose are 36.0% and 35.6Gy for hybrid-VMAT and 42% and 38.0Gy for the manual-VMAT. For the left (right) femur, the means of V30 and mean dose are 10.6% (11.6%) andmore » 17.9Gy (19.2Gy) for the hybrid-VMAT and 25.6% (24.1%) and 27.3Gy (26.2Gy) for the manual-VMAT. The hybrid-VMAT has significantly improved the organs at risk sparing. Conclusion: The integration of DVH prediction and Auto-Planning significantly improve the VMAT plan quality in the rectal cancer radiotherapy. Our results show the benefit of the new method and will be further investigated in other tumor sites.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648958
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; FORECASTING; HYBRIDIZATION; MANUALS; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PLANNING; RADIOTHERAPY; RECTUM

Citation Formats

Li, K, Chen, X, Wang, J, Lu, S, Chen, Y, and Hu, W. SU-F-T-359: Incorporating Dose Volume Histogram Prediction Into Auto-Planning for Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy in Rectal Cancer. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956544.
Li, K, Chen, X, Wang, J, Lu, S, Chen, Y, & Hu, W. SU-F-T-359: Incorporating Dose Volume Histogram Prediction Into Auto-Planning for Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy in Rectal Cancer. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956544.
Li, K, Chen, X, Wang, J, Lu, S, Chen, Y, and Hu, W. 2016. "SU-F-T-359: Incorporating Dose Volume Histogram Prediction Into Auto-Planning for Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy in Rectal Cancer". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956544.
@article{osti_22648958,
title = {SU-F-T-359: Incorporating Dose Volume Histogram Prediction Into Auto-Planning for Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy in Rectal Cancer},
author = {Li, K and Chen, X and Wang, J and Lu, S and Chen, Y and Hu, W},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To incorporate dose volume histogram (DVH) prediction into Auto-Planning for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning and investigate the benefit of this new technique for rectal cancer. Methods: Ninety clinically accepted VMAT plans for patients with rectal cancer were selected and trained in the RapidPlan for DVH prediction. Both internal and external validations were performed before implementing the prediction model. A new VMAT planning method (hybrid-VMAT) was created with combining the DVH prediction and Auto-Planning. For each new patient, the DVH will be predicted and individual DVH constrains will be obtained and were exported as the original optimization parameters to the Auto-Planning (Pinnacle3 treatment planning system, v9.10) for planning. A total of 20 rectal cancer patients previously treated with manual VMAT (manual-VMAT) plans were replanned using this new method. Dosimetric comparisons were performed between manual VMAT and new method plans. Results: Hybrid-VMAT shows similar PTV coverage to manual-VMAT in D2%, D98% and HI (p>0.05) and superior coverage in CI (p=0.000). For the bladder, the means of V40 and mean dose are 36.0% and 35.6Gy for hybrid-VMAT and 42% and 38.0Gy for the manual-VMAT. For the left (right) femur, the means of V30 and mean dose are 10.6% (11.6%) and 17.9Gy (19.2Gy) for the hybrid-VMAT and 25.6% (24.1%) and 27.3Gy (26.2Gy) for the manual-VMAT. The hybrid-VMAT has significantly improved the organs at risk sparing. Conclusion: The integration of DVH prediction and Auto-Planning significantly improve the VMAT plan quality in the rectal cancer radiotherapy. Our results show the benefit of the new method and will be further investigated in other tumor sites.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956544},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate whether Auto-Planning based volumetric-modulated radiotherapy (auto-VMAT) can reduce manual interaction time during treatment planning and improve plan quality for rectal cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Ten rectal cancer patients (stage II and III) after radical resection using Dixon surgery were enrolled. All patients were treated with VMAT technique. The manual VMAT plans (man-VMAT) were designed in the Pinnacle treatment planning system (Version 9.10) following the standard treatment planning procedure developed in our department. Clinical plans were manually designed by our experienced dosimetrists. Additionally, an auto-VMAT plan was created for each patient using Auto-Planning module. However, manual interaction was stillmore » applied to meet the clinical requirements. The treatment planning time and plan quality surrogated by the DVH parameters were compared between manual and automated plans. Results: The total planning time and manual interaction time were 50.38 and 4.47 min for the auto-VMAT and 36.81 and 16.94 min for the man-VMAT (t=60.14,−23.86; p=0.000, 0.000). In terms of plan quality, both plans meet the clinical requirements. The PTV homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI) were 0.054 and 0.822 for the auto-VMAT and 0.059 and 0.815 for the man-VMAT (t=−1.72, 0.36;p=0.119,0.730).Compared to the man-VMAT, the auto-VMAT showed reduction of 11.9% and 0.7% in V40 and V50 of the bladder, respectively.The V30 and D mean were reduced by 14.0% and 5.1Gy in the left femur and 12.2% and 3.8Gy in the right femur. Conclusion: The Auto-Planning based VMAT plans not only shows similar or superior plan quality to the manual ones in the rectal cancer radiotherapy, but also improve the planning efficiency significantly. However, manual interactions are still required to achieve a clinically acceptable plan based on our experiences.« less
  • Purpose: RapidPlan uses a library consisting of expert plans from different patients to create a model that can predict achievable dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for new patients. The goal of this study is to investigate the impacts of model library population (plan numbers) on the DVH prediction for rectal cancer patients treated with volumetric-modulated radiotherapy (VMAT) Methods: Ninety clinically accepted rectal cancer patients’ VMAT plans were selected to establish 3 models, named as Model30, Model60 and Model90, with 30,60, and 90 plans in the model training. All plans had sufficient target coverage and bladder and femora sparings. Additional 10 patients weremore » enrolled to test the DVH prediction differences with these 3 models. The predicted DVHs from these 3 models were compared and analyzed. Results: Predicted V40 (Vx, percent of volume that received x Gy for the organs at risk) and Dmean (mean dose, cGy) of the bladder were 39.84±13.38 and 2029.4±141.6 for the Model30,37.52±16.00 and 2012.5±152.2 for the Model60, and 36.33±18.35 and 2066.5±174.3 for the Model90. Predicted V30 and Dmean of the left femur were 23.33±9.96 and 1443.3±114.5 for the Model30, 21.83±5.75 and 1436.6±61.9 for the Model60, and 20.31±4.6 and 1415.0±52.4 for the Model90.There were no significant differences among the 3 models for the bladder and left femur predictions. Predicted V40 and Dmean of the right femur were 19.86±10.00 and 1403.6±115.6 (Model30),18.97±6.19 and 1401.9±68.78 (Model60), and 21.08±7.82 and 1424.0±85.3 (Model90). Although a slight lower DVH prediction of the right femur was found on the Model60, the mean differences for V30 and mean dose were less than 2% and 1%, respectively. Conclusion: There were no significant differences among Model30, Model60 and Model90 for predicting DVHs on rectal patients treated with VMAT. The impact of plan numbers for model library might be limited for cancers with similar target shape.« less
  • Purpose: To characterize the late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and propose dose-volume histogram (DVH) guidelines to limit late treatment-related toxicity. Methods and Materials: In this study 296 consecutive men were treated with IMRT for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Most patients received treatment to the prostate with or without proximal seminal vesicles (90%), to a median dose of 76 Gy. Concurrent androgen deprivation therapy was given to 150 men (51%) for a median of 4 months. Late toxicity was defined by Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 as greater thanmore » 3 months after radiation therapy completion. Four groupings of DVH parameters were defined, based on the percentage of rectal or bladder tissue receiving 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), 65 Gy (V{sub 65}), and 40 Gy (V{sub 40}). These DVH groupings, as well as clinical and treatment characteristics, were correlated to maximal Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity. Results: With a median follow-up of 41 months, the 4-year freedom from maximal Grade 2+ late toxicity was 81% and 91% for GU and GI systems, respectively, and by last follow-up, the rates of Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity were 9% and 5%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, whole-pelvic IMRT was associated with Grade 2+ GU toxicity and age was associated with Grade 2+ GI toxicity. Freedom from Grade 2+ GI toxicity at 4 years was 100% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}10%, V{sub 65} {<=}20%, and V{sub 40} {<=}40%; 92% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}20%, V{sub 65} {<=}40%, and V{sub 40} {<=}80%; and 85% for men exceeding these criteria (p = 0.13). These criteria were more highly associated with GI toxicity in men aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.07). No bladder dose-volume relationships were associated with the risk of GU toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with low rates of severe GU or GI toxicity after treatment for prostate cancer. Rectal dose constraints may help limit late GI morbidity.« less
  • Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET)–guided focal dose escalation in oropharyngeal cancer may potentially improve local control. We evaluated the feasibility of this approach using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) and compared these plans with fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) focal dose escalation plans. Materials and methods: An initial study of 20 patients compared RapidArc with fixed-field IMRT using standard dose prescriptions. From this cohort, 10 were included in a dose escalation planning study. Dose escalation was applied to {sup 18}F-FDG-PET–positive regions in the primary tumor at dose levels of 5% (DL1), 10% (DL2), and 15% (DL3) above standard radical dose (65 Gymore » in 30 fractions). Fixed-field IMRT and double-arc RapidArc plans were generated for each dataset. Dose-volume histograms were used for plan evaluation and comparison. The Paddick conformity index (CI{sub Paddick}) and monitor units (MU) for each plan were recorded and compared. Both IMRT and RapidArc produced clinically acceptable plans and achieved planning objectives for target volumes. Dose conformity was significantly better in the RapidArc plans, with lower CI{sub Paddick} scores in both primary (PTV1) and elective (PTV2) planning target volumes (largest difference in PTV1 at DL3; 0.81 ± 0.03 [RapidArc] vs. 0.77 ± 0.07 [IMRT], p = 0.04). Maximum dose constraints for spinal cord and brainstem were not exceeded in both RapidArc and IMRT plans, but mean doses were higher with RapidArc (by 2.7 ± 1 Gy for spinal cord and 1.9 ± 1 Gy for brainstem). Contralateral parotid mean dose was lower with RapidArc, which was statistically significant at DL1 (29.0 vs. 29.9 Gy, p = 0.01) and DL2 (29.3 vs. 30.3 Gy, p = 0.03). MU were reduced by 39.8–49.2% with RapidArc (largest difference at DL3, 641 ± 94 vs. 1261 ± 118, p < 0.01). {sup 18}F-FDG-PET–guided focal dose escalation in oropharyngeal cancer is feasible with RapidArc. Compared with conventional fixed-field IMRT, RapidArc can achieve better dose conformity, improve contralateral parotid sparing, and uses fewer MU.« less
  • Purpose: The main purpose of this work was to try to elucidate why, despite excellent rectal dose-volume histograms (DVHs), some patients treated for prostate cancer exhibit late rectal bleeding (LRB) and others with poor DVHs do not. Thirty-five genes involved in DNA repair/radiation response were analyzed in patients accrued in the AIROPROS 0101 trial, which investigated the correlation between LRB and dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients undergoing conformal radiotherapy with prescription doses higher than 70 Gy (minimum follow-up, 48 months) were selected: 10 patients in the low-risk group (rectal DVH with the percent volume of rectum receiving moremore » than 70 Gy [V70Gy] < 20% and the percent volume of rectum receiving more than 50 Gy [V50Gy] < 55%) with Grade 2 or Grade 3 (G2-G3) LRB, 10 patients in the high-risk group (V70Gy > 25% and V50Gy > 60%) with G2-G3 LRB, and 10 patients in the high-risk group with no toxicity. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was performed on RNA from lymphoblastoid cell lines obtained from Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized peripheral-blood mononucleated cells and on peripheral blood mononucleated cells. Interexpression levels were compared by using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Intergroup comparison showed many constitutive differences: nine genes were significantly down-regulated in the low-risk bleeder group vs. the high-risk bleeder and high-risk nonbleeder groups: AKR1B1 (p = 0.019), BAZ1B (p = 0.042), LSM7 (p = 0.0016), MRPL23 (p = 0.015), NUDT1 (p = 0.0031), PSMB4 (p = 0.079), PSMD1 (p = 0.062), SEC22L1 (p = 0.040), and UBB (p = 0.018). Four genes were significantly upregulated in the high-risk nonbleeder group than in the other groups: DDX17 (p = 0.048), DRAP1 (p = 0.0025), RAD23 (p = 0.015), and SRF (p = 0.024). For most of these genes, it was possible to establish a cut-off value that correctly classified most patients. Conclusions: The predictive value of sensitivity and resistance to LRB of the genes identified by the study is promising and should be tested in a larger data set.« less