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Title: SU-F-T-347: An Absolute Dose-Volume Constraint Based Deterministic Optimization Framework for Multi-Co60 Source Focused Radiotherapy

Abstract

Purpose: Treatment plan optimization in multi-Co60 source focused radiotherapy with multiple isocenters is challenging, because dose distribution is normalized to maximum dose during optimization and evaluation. The objective functions are traditionally defined based on relative dosimetric distribution. This study presents an alternative absolute dose-volume constraint (ADC) based deterministic optimization framework (ADC-DOF). Methods: The initial isocenters are placed on the eroded target surface. Collimator size is chosen based on the area of 2D contour on corresponding axial slice. The isocenter spacing is determined by adjacent collimator sizes. The weights are optimized by minimizing the deviation from ADCs using the steepest descent technique. An iterative procedure is developed to reduce the number of isocenters, where the isocenter with lowest weight is removed without affecting plan quality. The ADC-DOF is compared with the genetic algorithm (GA) using the same arbitrary shaped target (254cc), with a 15mm margin ring structure representing normal tissues. Results: For ADC-DOF, the ADCs imposed on target and ring are (D100>10Gy, D50,10, 0<12Gy, 15Gy and 20Gy) and (D40<10Gy). The resulting D100, 50, 10, 0 and D40 are (9.9Gy, 12.0Gy, 14.1Gy and 16.2Gy) and (10.2Gy). The objectives of GA are to maximize 50% isodose target coverage (TC) while minimize the dosemore » delivered to the ring structure, which results in 97% TC and 47.2% average dose in ring structure. For ADC-DOF (GA) techniques, 20 out of 38 (10 out of 12) initial isocenters are used in the final plan, and the computation time is 8.7s (412.2s) on an i5 computer. Conclusion: We have developed a new optimization technique using ADC and deterministic optimization. Compared with GA, ADC-DOF uses more isocenters but is faster and more robust, and achieves a better conformity. For future work, we will focus on developing a more effective mechanism for initial isocenter determination.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Beihang University, Beijing, Beijing (China)
  2. Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648949
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ITERATIVE METHODS; OPTIMIZATION; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Liang, B, Liu, B, Li, Y, Guo, B, Xu, X, Wei, R, Zhou, F, and Wu, Q. SU-F-T-347: An Absolute Dose-Volume Constraint Based Deterministic Optimization Framework for Multi-Co60 Source Focused Radiotherapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956532.
Liang, B, Liu, B, Li, Y, Guo, B, Xu, X, Wei, R, Zhou, F, & Wu, Q. SU-F-T-347: An Absolute Dose-Volume Constraint Based Deterministic Optimization Framework for Multi-Co60 Source Focused Radiotherapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956532.
Liang, B, Liu, B, Li, Y, Guo, B, Xu, X, Wei, R, Zhou, F, and Wu, Q. 2016. "SU-F-T-347: An Absolute Dose-Volume Constraint Based Deterministic Optimization Framework for Multi-Co60 Source Focused Radiotherapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956532.
@article{osti_22648949,
title = {SU-F-T-347: An Absolute Dose-Volume Constraint Based Deterministic Optimization Framework for Multi-Co60 Source Focused Radiotherapy},
author = {Liang, B and Liu, B and Li, Y and Guo, B and Xu, X and Wei, R and Zhou, F and Wu, Q},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Treatment plan optimization in multi-Co60 source focused radiotherapy with multiple isocenters is challenging, because dose distribution is normalized to maximum dose during optimization and evaluation. The objective functions are traditionally defined based on relative dosimetric distribution. This study presents an alternative absolute dose-volume constraint (ADC) based deterministic optimization framework (ADC-DOF). Methods: The initial isocenters are placed on the eroded target surface. Collimator size is chosen based on the area of 2D contour on corresponding axial slice. The isocenter spacing is determined by adjacent collimator sizes. The weights are optimized by minimizing the deviation from ADCs using the steepest descent technique. An iterative procedure is developed to reduce the number of isocenters, where the isocenter with lowest weight is removed without affecting plan quality. The ADC-DOF is compared with the genetic algorithm (GA) using the same arbitrary shaped target (254cc), with a 15mm margin ring structure representing normal tissues. Results: For ADC-DOF, the ADCs imposed on target and ring are (D100>10Gy, D50,10, 0<12Gy, 15Gy and 20Gy) and (D40<10Gy). The resulting D100, 50, 10, 0 and D40 are (9.9Gy, 12.0Gy, 14.1Gy and 16.2Gy) and (10.2Gy). The objectives of GA are to maximize 50% isodose target coverage (TC) while minimize the dose delivered to the ring structure, which results in 97% TC and 47.2% average dose in ring structure. For ADC-DOF (GA) techniques, 20 out of 38 (10 out of 12) initial isocenters are used in the final plan, and the computation time is 8.7s (412.2s) on an i5 computer. Conclusion: We have developed a new optimization technique using ADC and deterministic optimization. Compared with GA, ADC-DOF uses more isocenters but is faster and more robust, and achieves a better conformity. For future work, we will focus on developing a more effective mechanism for initial isocenter determination.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956532},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To determine the rectal tolerance to Grade 2 rectal bleeding after I-125 seed brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), based on the rectal dose-volume histogram. Methods and Materials: A total of 458 consecutive patients with stages T1 to T3 prostate cancer received combined modality treatment consisting of I-125 seed implantation followed by EBRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles. The prescribed doses of brachytherapy and EBRT were 100 Gy and 45 Gy in 25 fractions, respectively. The rectal dosimetric factors were analyzed for rectal volumes receiving >100 Gy and >150 Gy (R100 and R150) during brachytherapy and formore » rectal volumes receiving >30 Gy to 40 Gy (V30-V40) during EBRT therapy in 373 patients for whom datasets were available. The patients were followed from 21 to 72 months (median, 45 months) after the I-125 seed implantation. Results: Forty-four patients (9.7%) developed Grade 2 rectal bleeding. On multivariate analysis, age (p = 0.014), R100 (p = 0.002), and V30 (p = 0.001) were identified as risk factors for Grade 2 rectal bleeding. The rectal bleeding rate increased as the R100 increased: 5.0% (2/40 patients) for 0 ml; 7.5% (20/267 patients) for >0 to 0.5 ml; 11.0% (11/100 patients) for >0.5 to 1 ml; 17.9% (5/28 patients) for >1 to 1.5 ml; and 27.3% (6/22 patients) for >1.5 ml (p = 0.014). Grade 2 rectal bleeding developed in 6.4% (12/188) of patients with a V30 {<=}35% and in 14.1% (26/185) of patients with a V30 >35% (p = 0.02). When these dose-volume parameters were considered in combination, the Grade 2 rectal bleeding rate was 4.2% (5/120 patients) for a R100 {<=}0.5 ml and a V30 {<=}35%, whereas it was 22.4% (13/58 patients) for R100 of >0.5 ml and V30 of >35%. Conclusion: The risk of rectal bleeding was found to be significantly volume-dependent in patients with prostate cancer who received combined modality treatment. Rectal dose-volume analysis is a practical method for predicting the risk of development of Grade 2 rectal bleeding.« less
  • The goal of this work was to calculate the dose distribution around a high dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source using a multi-group discrete ordinates code and then to compare the results with a Monte Carlo calculated dose distribution. The unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete ordinates code Attila version 6.1.1 was used to calculate the photon kerma rate distribution in water around the Nucletron microSelectron mHDRv2 source. MCNPX 2.5.c was used to compute the Monte Carlo water photon kerma rate distribution. Two hundred million histories were simulated, resulting in standard errors of the mean of less than 3% overall. The number ofmore » energy groups, S{sub n} (angular order), P{sub n} (scattering order), and mesh elements were varied in addition to the method of analytic ray tracing to assess their effects on the deterministic solution. Water photon kerma rate matrices were exported from both codes into an in-house data analysis software. This software quantified the percent dose difference distribution, the number of points within {+-}3% and {+-}5%, and the mean percent difference between the two codes. The data demonstrated that a 5 energy-group cross-section set calculated results to within 0.5% of a 15 group cross-section set. S{sub 12} was sufficient to resolve the solution in angle. P{sub 2} expansion of the scattering cross-section was necessary to compute accurate distributions. A computational mesh with 55 064 tetrahedral elements in a 30 cm diameter phantom resolved the solution spatially. An efficiency factor of 110 with the above parameters was realized in comparison to MC methods. The Attila code provided an accurate and efficient solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for the mHDRv2 source.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the advantages of anatomy-based inverse optimization (IO) in planning high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 114 patients who received HDR brachytherapy (9 Gy in two fractions) combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) were analyzed. The dose distributions of HDR brachytherapy were optimized using geometric optimization (GO) in 70 patients and by anatomy-based IO in the remaining 44 patients. The correlation between the dose-volume histogram parameters, including the urethral dose and the incidence of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity, was evaluated. Results: The averaged values of the percentage of volume receiving 80-150% of the prescribedmore » minimal peripheral dose (V{sub 8}-V{sub 15}) of the urethra generated by anatomy-based IO were significantly lower than the corresponding values generated by GO. Similarly, the averaged values of the minimal dose received by 5-50% of the target volume (D{sub 5}-D{sub 5}) obtained using anatomy-based IO were significantly lower than those obtained using GO. Regarding acute toxicity, Grade 2 or worse acute GU toxicity developed in 23% of all patients, but was significantly lower in patients for whom anatomy-based IO (16%) was used than in those for whom GO was used (37%), consistent with the reduced urethral dose (p <0.01). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that anatomy-based IO is superior to GO for dose optimization in HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer.« less
  • Purpose: Accurate modeling of rectal complications based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) data are necessary to allow safe dose escalation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. We applied different equivalent uniform dose (EUD)-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models to rectal wall DVHs and follow-up data for 319 prostate cancer patients to identify the dosimetric factors most predictive for Grade {>=} 2 rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: Data for 319 patients treated at the William Beaumont Hospital with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) under an adaptive radiotherapy protocol were used for this study. The following models were considered: (1) Lyman modelmore » and (2) logit-formula with DVH reduced to generalized EUD (3) serial reconstruction unit (RU) model (4) Poisson-EUD model, and (5) mean dose- and (6) cutoff dose-logistic regression model. The parameters and their confidence intervals were determined using maximum likelihood estimation. Results: Of the patients, 51 (16.0%) showed Grade 2 or higher bleeding. As assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, the Lyman- and Logit-EUD, serial RU, and Poisson-EUD model fitted the data very well. Rectal wall mean dose did not correlate to Grade 2 or higher bleeding. For the cutoff dose model, the volume receiving > 73.7 Gy showed most significant correlation to bleeding. However, this model fitted the data more poorly than the EUD-based models. Conclusions: Our study clearly confirms a volume effect for late rectal bleeding. This can be described very well by the EUD-like models, of which the serial RU- and Poisson-EUD model can describe the data with only two parameters. Dose-volume-based cutoff-dose models performed wor0008.« less
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a computational framework for monitoring four-dimensional (4D) dose distributions during treatment time based on a 2D/3D registration with adaptive transformation parameters (ATPs) in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: The 4D dose distributions during the SBRT were calculated by applying a pencil beam convolution (PBC) algorithm to simulated 4D-computed tomography (CT) images during treatment time (hereinafter referred to as “treatment” 4D-CT images). The “treatment” 4D-CT images were derived by deforming 3D planning CT images by using transformation parameters so that 2D planning portal dose images (PDIs) can resemble 2D dynamic clinicalmore » PDIs in each frame, which were derived from electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. The transformation parameters were optimized by the Levenberg- Marquardt (LM) algorithm. The optimized transformation parameters in a certain frame were adaptively employed as initial transformation parameters for optimization of the parameters in the consecutive frame. Gamma pass rates (3mm/3%) between dynamic clinical PDIs and dynamic “treatment” PDIs derived from the “treatment” 4D-CT images were measured for comparing the proposed frameworks without and with the ATPs. These proposed frameworks were applied to the EPID dynamic images (40 frames) of two patients with lung cancer, who underwent the SBRT. Results: Gamma pass rates without and with the ATPs were 83.01±4.42% and 89.31±3.18% on average, respectively (p<0.05). Moreover, percentage errors between prescribed doses and estimated doses at an isocenter by the proposed frameworks without and with the ATPs were 10.67±5.66% and 6.34±0.47% on average, respectively (p<0.05). Conclusion: The proposed framework with ATPs could be useful to ensure the quality of the SBRT by monitoring 4D dose distributions during treatment time.« less