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Title: SU-F-T-336: A Quick Auto-Planning (QAP) Method for Patient Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT)

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop a quick auto-planning system that permits fast patient IMRT planning with conformal dose to the target without manual field alignment and time-consuming dose distribution optimization. Methods: The planning target volume (PTV) of the source and the target patient were projected to the iso-center plane in certain beameye- view directions to derive the 2D projected shapes. Assuming the target interior was isotropic for each beam direction boundary analysis under polar coordinate was performed to map the source shape boundary to the target shape boundary to derive the source-to-target shape mapping function. The derived shape mapping function was used to morph the source beam aperture to the target beam aperture over all segments in each beam direction. The target beam weights were re-calculated to deliver the same dose to the reference point (iso-center) as the source beam did in the source plan. The approach was tested on two rectum patients (one source patient and one target patient). Results: The IMRT planning time by QAP was 5 seconds on a laptop computer. The dose volume histograms and the dose distribution showed the target patient had the similar PTV dose coverage and OAR dose sparingmore » with the source patient. Conclusion: The QAP system can instantly and automatically finish the IMRT planning without dose optimization.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648939
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BEAMS; MAPPING; PATIENTS; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIOTHERAPY; SHAPE

Citation Formats

Peng, J, Zhang, Z, Wang, J, Xie, J, Lu, S, Zhao, J, and Hu, W. SU-F-T-336: A Quick Auto-Planning (QAP) Method for Patient Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956521.
Peng, J, Zhang, Z, Wang, J, Xie, J, Lu, S, Zhao, J, & Hu, W. SU-F-T-336: A Quick Auto-Planning (QAP) Method for Patient Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956521.
Peng, J, Zhang, Z, Wang, J, Xie, J, Lu, S, Zhao, J, and Hu, W. Wed . "SU-F-T-336: A Quick Auto-Planning (QAP) Method for Patient Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT)". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956521.
@article{osti_22648939,
title = {SU-F-T-336: A Quick Auto-Planning (QAP) Method for Patient Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT)},
author = {Peng, J and Zhang, Z and Wang, J and Xie, J and Lu, S and Zhao, J and Hu, W},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop a quick auto-planning system that permits fast patient IMRT planning with conformal dose to the target without manual field alignment and time-consuming dose distribution optimization. Methods: The planning target volume (PTV) of the source and the target patient were projected to the iso-center plane in certain beameye- view directions to derive the 2D projected shapes. Assuming the target interior was isotropic for each beam direction boundary analysis under polar coordinate was performed to map the source shape boundary to the target shape boundary to derive the source-to-target shape mapping function. The derived shape mapping function was used to morph the source beam aperture to the target beam aperture over all segments in each beam direction. The target beam weights were re-calculated to deliver the same dose to the reference point (iso-center) as the source beam did in the source plan. The approach was tested on two rectum patients (one source patient and one target patient). Results: The IMRT planning time by QAP was 5 seconds on a laptop computer. The dose volume histograms and the dose distribution showed the target patient had the similar PTV dose coverage and OAR dose sparing with the source patient. Conclusion: The QAP system can instantly and automatically finish the IMRT planning without dose optimization.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956521},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate whether Auto-Planning based volumetric-modulated radiotherapy (auto-VMAT) can reduce manual interaction time during treatment planning and improve plan quality for rectal cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Ten rectal cancer patients (stage II and III) after radical resection using Dixon surgery were enrolled. All patients were treated with VMAT technique. The manual VMAT plans (man-VMAT) were designed in the Pinnacle treatment planning system (Version 9.10) following the standard treatment planning procedure developed in our department. Clinical plans were manually designed by our experienced dosimetrists. Additionally, an auto-VMAT plan was created for each patient using Auto-Planning module. However, manual interaction was stillmore » applied to meet the clinical requirements. The treatment planning time and plan quality surrogated by the DVH parameters were compared between manual and automated plans. Results: The total planning time and manual interaction time were 50.38 and 4.47 min for the auto-VMAT and 36.81 and 16.94 min for the man-VMAT (t=60.14,−23.86; p=0.000, 0.000). In terms of plan quality, both plans meet the clinical requirements. The PTV homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI) were 0.054 and 0.822 for the auto-VMAT and 0.059 and 0.815 for the man-VMAT (t=−1.72, 0.36;p=0.119,0.730).Compared to the man-VMAT, the auto-VMAT showed reduction of 11.9% and 0.7% in V40 and V50 of the bladder, respectively.The V30 and D mean were reduced by 14.0% and 5.1Gy in the left femur and 12.2% and 3.8Gy in the right femur. Conclusion: The Auto-Planning based VMAT plans not only shows similar or superior plan quality to the manual ones in the rectal cancer radiotherapy, but also improve the planning efficiency significantly. However, manual interactions are still required to achieve a clinically acceptable plan based on our experiences.« less
  • Purpose This study compares the dosimetric parameters in treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma between intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and intensity modulated x-ray radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: We studied four patients treated at our institution. All patients were simulated supine with 4D-CT using a GE light speed simulator with a maximum slice thickness of 3mm. The average CT and an internal target volume to account for respiration motion were used for planning. Both IMRT and IMPT plans were created using Elekta’s CMSXiO treatment planning system (TPS). The prescription dose was 58.05 CGE in 15 fractions. The IMRT plansmore » had five beams with combination of co-planar and non-co-planar. The IMPT plans had 2 to 3 beams. Dose comparison was performed based on the averaged results of the four patients. Results The mean dose and V95% to PTV were 58.24CGE, 98.57% for IMPT, versus 57.34CGE and 96.68% for IMRT, respectively. The V10, V20, V30 and mean dose of the normal liver for IMPT were 23.10%, 18.61%, 13.75% and 9.78 CGE; and 47.19%, 37.55%, 22.73% and 17.12CGE for IMRT. The spinal cord didn’t receive any dose in IMPT technique, but received a maximum of 18.77CGE for IMRT. The IMPT gave lower maximum dose to the stomach as compared to IMRT (19.26 vs 26.35CGE). V14 for left and right kidney was 0% and 2.32% for IMPT and 3.89% and 29.54% for IMRT. The mean dose, V35, V40 and V45 for small bowl were similar in both techniques, 0.74CGE, 6.27cc, 4.85cc and 3.53 cc for IMPT, 3.47CGE, 9.73cc, 7.61cc 5.35cc for IMRT. Conclusion Based on this study, IMPT plans gave less dose to the critical structures such as normal liver, kidney, stomach and spinal cord as compared to IMRT plans, potentially leading to less toxicity and providing better quality of life for patients.« less
  • Purpose: To develop a new radiotherapy plan optimization technique that, for a given organ geometry, will find the optimal photon beam energies and fluences to produce a desirable dose distribution. This new modulated (both in energy and fluence) photon radiotherapy (XMRT) was compared with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for a simple organ geometry. Methods: The XMRT optimization was formulated using a linear programming approach where the objective function is the mean dose to the healthy organs and dose-point constraints were assigned to each organ of interest. The organ geometry consisted of a target, two organs at risk (OARs), and normalmore » tissue. A seven-equispaced-coplanar beam arrangement was used. For conventional IMRT, only 6 MV beams were available, while XMRT was optimized using 6 and 18 MV beams. A prescribed dose (PD) of 72 GY was assigned to the target, with upper and lower bounds of 110% and 95% of the PD, respectively. Both OARs were assigned a maximum dose of 64 Gy, while the normal tissue was assigned a maximum dose of 66 Gy. A numerical solver, Gurobi, generated solutions for the XMRT and IMRT problems. The dose-volume histograms from IMRT and XMRT solutions were compared. Results: The maximum, minimum, mean, and homogeneity of the dose to the target were comparable between IMRT and XMRT. Though IMRT had improved dose conformity relative to XMRT, XMRT reduced the mean dose to both OARs by more than 1 Gy. For normal tissue, an increase of 5 Gy in mean dose and 27 percent in integral dose was seen for IMRT relative to XMRT. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the benefits of simultaneously modulating photon beam energy and fluence using our XMRT approach in a given phantom geometry. While target coverage was comparable, dose to healthy structures was reduced using XMRT.« less
  • Purpose: Complex intensity modulated arc therapy tends to spread low dose to normal tissue(NT)regions to obtain improved target conformity and homogeneity and OAR sparing.This work evaluates the trade-offs between PTV homogeneity and reduction of the maximum dose(Dmax)spread to NT while planning of IMRT,VMAT and Tomotherapy. Methods: Ten prostate patients,previously planned with step-and-shoot IMRT,were selected.To fairly evaluate how PTV homogeneity was affected by NT Dmax constraints,original IMRT DVH objectives for PTV and OARs(femoral heads,and rectal and bladder wall)applied to 2 VMAT plans in Pinnacle(V9.0), and Tomotherapy(V4.2).The only constraint difference was the NT which was defined as body contours excluding targets,OARs andmore » dose rings.NT Dmax constraint for 1st VMAT was set to the prescription dose(Dp).For 2nd VMAT(VMAT-NT)and Tomotherapy,it was set to the Dmax achieved in IMRT(~70-80% of Dp).All NT constraints were set to the lowest priority.Three common homogeneity indices(HI),RTOG-HI=Dmax/Dp,moderated-HI=D95%/D5% and complex-HI=(D2%-D98%)/Dp*100 were calculated. Results: All modalities with similar dosimetric endpoints for PTV and OARs.The complex-HI shows the most variability of indices,with average values of 5.9,4.9,9.3 and 6.1 for IMRT,VMAT,VMAT-NT and Tomotherapy,respectively.VMAT provided the best PTV homogeneity without compromising any OAR/NT sparing.Both VMAT-NT and Tomotherapy,planned with more restrictive NT constraints,showed reduced homogeneity,with VMAT-NT showing the worst homogeneity(P<0.0001)for all HI.Tomotherapy gave the lowest NT Dmax,with slightly decreased homogeneity compared to VMAT. Finally, there was no significant difference in NT Dmax or Dmean between VMAT and VMAT-NT. Conclusion: PTV HI is highly dependent on permitted NT constraints. Results demonstrated that VMAT-NT with more restrictive NT constraints does not reduce Dmax NT,but significantly receives higher Dmax and worse target homogeneity.Therefore, it is critical that planners do not use too restrictive NT constraints during VMAT optimization.Tomotherapy plan was not as sensitive to NT constraints,however,care shall be taken to ensure NT is not pushed too hard.These results are relevant for clinical practice.The biological effect of higher Dmax and increased target heterogeneity needs further study.« less
  • Purpose: Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) can be used to acquire a two-dimensional exit dose distribution during treatment delivery, thus allowing the in-vivo verification of the dose delivery through a comparison of measured portal images to predicted portal dose images (PDI). The aim of this study was to present a novel method to easily and accurately predict PDI, and to establish an EPID-based in-vivo dose verification method during IMRT treatments. Methods: We developed a model to determine the predicted portal dose at the same plane of the EPID detector location. The Varian EPID (aS1000) positions at 150cm source-to-detector-distance (SDD), andmore » can be used to acquire in-vivo exit dose using Portal Dosimetry (PD) function. Our model was generated to make an equivalent water thickness represent the buildup plate of EPID. The exit dose at extend SDD plane with patient CT data in the beam can be calculated as the predicted PDI in the treatment planning system (TPS). After that, the PDI was converted to the fluence at SDD of 150cm using the inverse square law coded in MATLAB. Five head-and-neck and prostate IMRT patient plans contain 32 fields were investigated to evaluate the feasibility of this new method. The measured EPID image was compared with PDI using the gamma analysis. Results: The average results for cumulative dose comparison were 81.9% and 91.6% for 3%, 3mm and 4%, 4mm gamma criteria, respectively. Results indicate that the patient transit dosimetry predicted algorithm compares well with EPID measured PD doses for test situations. Conclusion: Our new method can be used as an easy and feasible tool for online EPID-based in-vivo dose delivery verification for IMRT treatments. It can be implemented for fast detecting those obvious treatment delivery errors for individual field and patient quality assurance.« less