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Title: SU-F-T-328: Real-Time in Vivo Dosimetry of Prostate SBRT Boost Treatments Using MOSkin Detectors

Abstract

Purpose: To provide in vivo measurements of dose to the anterior rectal wall during prostate SBRT boost treatments using MOSFET detectors. Methods: Dual MOSkin detectors were attached to a Rectafix rectal sparing device and inserted into patients during SBRT boost treatments. Patients received two boost fractions, each of 9.5–10 Gy and delivered using 2 VMAT arcs. Measurements were acquired for 12 patients. MOSFET voltages were read out at 1 Hz during delivery and converted to dose. MV images were acquired at known frequency during treatment so that the position of the gantry at each point in time was known. The cumulative dose at the MOSFET location was extracted from the treatment planning system at in 5.2° increments (FF beams) or at 5 points during each delivered arc (FFF beams). The MOSFET dose and planning system dose throughout the entirety of each arc were then compared using root mean square error normalised to the final planned dose for each arc. Results: The average difference between MOSFET measured and planning system doses determined over the entire course of treatment was 9.7% with a standard deviation of 3.6%. MOSFETs measured below the planned dose in 66% of arcs measured. Uncertainty in the positionmore » of the MOSFET detector and verification point are major sources of discrepancy, as the detector is placed in a high dose gradient region during treatment. Conclusion: MOSkin detectors were able to provide real time in vivo measurements of anterior rectal wall dose during prostate SBRT boost treatments. This method could be used to verify Rectafix positioning and treatment delivery. Further developments could enable this method to be used during high dose treatments to monitor dose to the rectal wall to ensure it remains at safe levels. Funding has been provided by the University of Newcastle. Kimberley Legge is the recipient of an Australian Postgraduate Award.« less

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2]; ;  [3];  [1];  [4]
  1. University of Newcastle (Australia)
  2. University of Wollongong (Australia)
  3. Calvary Mater Newcastle (Australia)
  4. (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648934
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; MOSFET; PATIENTS; PLANNING; POSITIONING; PROSTATE; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; RECTUM

Citation Formats

Legge, K, O’Connor, D J, Cutajar, D, Rozenfeld, A, Wilfert, A, Martin, J, Greer, P, and Calvary Mater Newcastle. SU-F-T-328: Real-Time in Vivo Dosimetry of Prostate SBRT Boost Treatments Using MOSkin Detectors. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956513.
Legge, K, O’Connor, D J, Cutajar, D, Rozenfeld, A, Wilfert, A, Martin, J, Greer, P, & Calvary Mater Newcastle. SU-F-T-328: Real-Time in Vivo Dosimetry of Prostate SBRT Boost Treatments Using MOSkin Detectors. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956513.
Legge, K, O’Connor, D J, Cutajar, D, Rozenfeld, A, Wilfert, A, Martin, J, Greer, P, and Calvary Mater Newcastle. Wed . "SU-F-T-328: Real-Time in Vivo Dosimetry of Prostate SBRT Boost Treatments Using MOSkin Detectors". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956513.
@article{osti_22648934,
title = {SU-F-T-328: Real-Time in Vivo Dosimetry of Prostate SBRT Boost Treatments Using MOSkin Detectors},
author = {Legge, K and O’Connor, D J and Cutajar, D and Rozenfeld, A and Wilfert, A and Martin, J and Greer, P and Calvary Mater Newcastle},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To provide in vivo measurements of dose to the anterior rectal wall during prostate SBRT boost treatments using MOSFET detectors. Methods: Dual MOSkin detectors were attached to a Rectafix rectal sparing device and inserted into patients during SBRT boost treatments. Patients received two boost fractions, each of 9.5–10 Gy and delivered using 2 VMAT arcs. Measurements were acquired for 12 patients. MOSFET voltages were read out at 1 Hz during delivery and converted to dose. MV images were acquired at known frequency during treatment so that the position of the gantry at each point in time was known. The cumulative dose at the MOSFET location was extracted from the treatment planning system at in 5.2° increments (FF beams) or at 5 points during each delivered arc (FFF beams). The MOSFET dose and planning system dose throughout the entirety of each arc were then compared using root mean square error normalised to the final planned dose for each arc. Results: The average difference between MOSFET measured and planning system doses determined over the entire course of treatment was 9.7% with a standard deviation of 3.6%. MOSFETs measured below the planned dose in 66% of arcs measured. Uncertainty in the position of the MOSFET detector and verification point are major sources of discrepancy, as the detector is placed in a high dose gradient region during treatment. Conclusion: MOSkin detectors were able to provide real time in vivo measurements of anterior rectal wall dose during prostate SBRT boost treatments. This method could be used to verify Rectafix positioning and treatment delivery. Further developments could enable this method to be used during high dose treatments to monitor dose to the rectal wall to ensure it remains at safe levels. Funding has been provided by the University of Newcastle. Kimberley Legge is the recipient of an Australian Postgraduate Award.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956513},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: A high-resolution scintillating fiber detector was built for in-vivo real-time patient specific quality assurance (QA). The detector is designed for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to monitor treatment delivery and detect real-time deviations from planned dose to increase patient safety and treatment accuracy. Methods: The detector consists of two high-density scintillating fiber arrays layered to form an X-Y grid which can be attached to the accessory tray of a medical linac for SBRT and cone SRS treatment QA. Fiber arrays consist of 128 scintillating fibers embedded within a precision-machined, high-transmission polymer substrate with 0.8mm pitch. Themore » fibers are coupled on both ends to high-sensitivity photodetectors and the output is recorded through a high-speed analog-to-digital converter to capture the linac pulse sequence as treatment delivery progresses. The detector has a software controlled 360 degree rotational system to capture angular beam projections for high-resolution beam profile reconstruction. Results: The detector was validated using SRS cone sizes from 6mm to 34mm and MLC defined field sizes from 5×5mm2 to 100×100mm2. The detector output response is linear with dose and is dose rate independent. Each field can be reconstructed accurately with a spatial resolution of 0.8mm and the current beam output is displayed every 50msec. Dosimetric errors of 1% with respect to the treatment plan can be identified and clinically significant deviations from the expected treatment can be displayed in real-time to alert the therapists. Conclusion: The high resolution detector is capable of reconstructing beam profiles in real-time with submillimeter resolution and 1% dose resolution. This system has the ability to project in-vivo both spatial and dosimetric errors during SBRT and SRS treatments when only a non-clinically significant fraction of the intended dose was delivered. The device has the potential to establish new standards for in-vivo patient specific QA.« less
  • Purpose: To determine prostate motion during SBRT boost treatments with a Rectafix rectal sparing device in place using kV imaging during treatment. Methods: Patients each had three gold fiducial markers inserted into the prostate and received two VMAT boost fractions of 9.5–10 Gy under the PROMETHEUS clinical trial protocol with a Rectafix rectal retractor in place. Two-dimensional kilovoltage images of fiducial markers were acquired continuously during delivery. Three patients were treated on a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator (6X, 600 MU/min), where kV images were acquired at 5 Hz during treatment. Seven patients were treated on a Varian Truebeam linearmore » accelerator (10XFFF, 2400 MU/min) where kV images were acquired every 3 seconds. Images were processed off-line using the Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring (KIM) software after treatment. KIM determines prostate position in three dimensions from 2D kV projections using a probability density model and a pre-treatment kV arc. The 3D displacement of the prostate was quantified as a function of time throughout each fraction. Results: From all fractions analyzed, it was found that the prostate had moved less than 1 mm in any direction from its initial position 84.6% of the time. The prostate was between 1 and 2 mm from its initial position 14.2% of the time, between 2 and 3 mm of its initial position 0.8% of the time and was greater than 3 mm from its initial position only 0.4% of the time. Conclusion: The amount of prostate motion observed during prostate SBRT boost treatments with a Rectafix device in place was minimal and lower than that observed in non-Rectafix studies. The Rectafix device reduces rectal dose as well as immobilizing the prostate. Kimberley Legge is the recipient of an Australian Postgraduate Award.« less
  • Purpose: The use of fiducials markers in prostate treatment allows a precise localization of this volume. Typical prostate SBRT margins with fiducials markers are 5mm in all directions, except toward the rectum, where 3mm is used. For some patients nearby pelvic lymph nodes with 5mm margin need to be irradiate assuming that its localization is linked to the prostate fiducial markers instead of bony anatomy. The purpose of this work was to analyze the geometric impact of locate the lymph node regions through the patient positioning by prostate fiducial markers. Methods: 10 patients with prostate SBRT with lymph nodes irradiationmore » were selected. Each patient had 5 implanted titanium fiducial markers. A Novalis TX (BrainLAB-Varian) with ExacTrac and aSi1000 portal image was used. Treatment plan uses 11 beams with a dose prescription (D95%) of 40Gy to the prostate and 25Gy to the lymph node in 5 fractions. Daily positioning was carried out by ExacTrac system based on the implanted fiducials as the reference treatment position; further position verification was performed using the ExacTrac and two portal images (gantry angle 0 and 90) based on bony structures. Comparison between reference position with bony based ExacTrac and portal image localization, was done for each treatment fraction Results: A total of 50 positioning analysis were done. The average discrepancy between reference treatment position and ExacTrac based on bony anatomy (pubic area) was 4.2mm [0.3; 11.2]. The discrepancy was <5mm in 61% of the cases and <9mm in 92%. Using portal images the average discrepancy was 3.7mm [0.0; 11.1]. The discrepancy was <5mm in 69% of the cases and <9mm in 96%. Conclusion: Localizing lymph node by prostate fiducial markers may produce large discrepancy as large as 11mm compared to bony based localization. Dosimetric impact of this discrepancy should be studied.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this work was to quantify the dosimetric impact of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation algorithm compared to Pencil Beam (PB) on Spine SBRT with HybridARC (HA) and sliding windows IMRT (dMLC) treatment modality. Methods: A 6MV beam (1000MU/min) produced by a Novalis TX (BrainLAB-Varian) equipped with HDMLC was used. HA uses 1 arc plus 8 IMRT beams (arc weight between 60–40%) and dIMRT 15 beams. Plans were calculated using iPlan v.4.5.3 (BrainLAB) and the treatment dose prescription was 27Gy in 3 fractions. Dose calculation was done by PB (4mm spatial resolution) with heterogeneity correction and MCmore » dose to water (4mm spatial resolution and 4% mean variance). PTV and spinal cord dose comparison were done. Study was done on 12 patients. IROC Spine Phantom was used to validate HA and quantify dose variation using PB and MC algorithm. Results: The difference between PB and MC for PTV D98%, D95%, Dmean, D2% were 2.6% [−5.1, 6.8], 0.1% [−4.2, 5.4], 0.9% [−1.5, 3.8] and 2.4% [−0.5, 8.3]. The difference between PB and MC for spinal cord Dmax, D1.2cc and D0.35cc were 5.3% [−6.4, 18.4], 9% [−7.0, 17.0] and 7.6% [−0.6, 14.8] respectively. IROC spine phantom shows PTV TLD dose variation of 0.98% for PB and 1.01% for MC. Axial and sagittal film plane gamma index (5%-3mm) was 95% and 97% for PB and 95% and 99% for MC. Conclusion: PB slightly underestimates the dose for the PTV. For the spinal cord PB underestimates the dose and dose differences could be as high as 18% which could have unexpected clinical impact. CI shows no variation between PB and MC for both treatment modalities Treatment modalities have no impact with the dose calculation algorithms used. Following the IROC pass-fail criteria, treatment acceptance requirement was fulfilled for PB and MC.« less
  • Purpose: Recently, there has been increased clinical use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). SBRT treatments will strongly benefit from in vivo patient dose verification, as any errors in delivery can be more detrimental to the radiobiology of the patient as compared to conventional therapy. In vivo dose measurements, a commercially available quality assurance platform which is able to correlate the delivered dose to the patient’s anatomy and take into account tissue inhomogeneity, is the COMPASS system (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) using a new transmission detector (Dolphin, IBA Dosimetry). In this work, we evaluate a method for in vivo 3D dosemore » reconstruction for SBRT using a new transmission detector, which was developed for in vivo dose verification for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: We evaluated the accuracy of measurement for SBRT using simple small fields (2×2−10×10 cm2), a multileaf collimator (MLC) test pattern, and clinical cases. The dose distributions from the COMPASS were compared with those of EDR2 films (Kodak, USA) and the Monte Carlo simulations (MC). For clinical cases, we compared MC using dose-volume-histograms (DVHs) and dose profiles. Results: The dose profiles from the COMPASS for small fields and the complicated MLC test pattern agreed with those of EDR2 films, and MC within 3%. This showed the COMPASS with Dolphin system showed good spatial resolution and can measure small fields which are required for SBRT. Those results also suggest that COMPASS with Dolphin is able to detect MLC leaf position errors for SBRT. In clinical cases, the COMPASS with Dolphin agreed well with MC. The Dolphin detector, which consists of ionization chambers, provided stable measurement. Conclusion: COMPASS with Dolphin detector showed a useful in vivo 3D dose reconstruction for SBRT. The accuracy of the results indicates that this approach is suitable for clinical implementation.« less