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Title: SU-F-T-327: Total Body Irradiation In-Vivo Dose Measurements Using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) NanoDots and Farmer Type Ion Chamber

Abstract

Purpose: This study was performed to analyze the agreement between optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) nanoDots measured doses and 0.6 cc Farmer type ionization chamber measured doses during total body irradiation (TBI). Methods: In-vivo dose measurements using OSL nanoDots and Farmer chamber were done in a total of twelve patients who received TBI at our center by bilateral parallel-opposed beams technique. In this technique, the patient is kept inside the TBI box which is filled with rice bags and irradiated using two bilateral parallel opposed beams of 40×40 cm{sup 2} size with 45° collimator rotation at an SSD of 333.5 cm in an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. All patients received a dose of 2 Gy in single fraction as conditioning regimen. The beams were equally weighted at the midplane of the box. The nanoDots were placed over forehead, right and left neck, right and left lung, umbilicus, right and left abdomen, medial part of thigh, knee and toe. A 0.6 cc Farmer chamber was placed in between the thighs of the patient. Measured doses are reported along with the statistical comparisons using paired sample t-test. Results: For the above sites the mean doses were 212.2±21.1, 218.2±7.6, 218.7±9.3, 215.6±9.5, 217.5±11.5, 214.5±7.7, 218.3±6.8,more » 221.5±15, 229.1±11.0, 220.5±7.7 and 223.3±5.1 cGy respectively. For all OSL measurements the mean dose was 218.6±11.8 cGy. Farmer chamber measurements yielded a mean dose of 208.8±15.6 cGy. Statistical analysis revealed that there was no significant difference between OSL measured doses in forehead, right and left neck, right and left lung, umbilicus, right and left abdomen and toe and Farmer chamber measured doses (0.72≤p≤0.06). However the mean OSL doses at thigh and knee were statistically different (p<0.05) from the Farmer chamber measurements. Conclusion: OSL measurements were found to be in agreement with Farmer type ionization chamber measurements in in-vivo dosimetry of TBI.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648933
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BEAMS; BONE JOINTS; FARMS; IN VIVO; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; IONS; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; LUMINESCENCE; PATIENTS; QUANTUM DOTS; WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION

Citation Formats

Kaur, H, Kumar, S, Sarkar, B, Ganesh, T, Giri, U, Jassal, K, Rathinamuthu, S, Gulia, G, Gopal, V, Mohanti, B, and Munshi, A. SU-F-T-327: Total Body Irradiation In-Vivo Dose Measurements Using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) NanoDots and Farmer Type Ion Chamber. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956512.
Kaur, H, Kumar, S, Sarkar, B, Ganesh, T, Giri, U, Jassal, K, Rathinamuthu, S, Gulia, G, Gopal, V, Mohanti, B, & Munshi, A. SU-F-T-327: Total Body Irradiation In-Vivo Dose Measurements Using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) NanoDots and Farmer Type Ion Chamber. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956512.
Kaur, H, Kumar, S, Sarkar, B, Ganesh, T, Giri, U, Jassal, K, Rathinamuthu, S, Gulia, G, Gopal, V, Mohanti, B, and Munshi, A. Wed . "SU-F-T-327: Total Body Irradiation In-Vivo Dose Measurements Using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) NanoDots and Farmer Type Ion Chamber". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956512.
@article{osti_22648933,
title = {SU-F-T-327: Total Body Irradiation In-Vivo Dose Measurements Using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) NanoDots and Farmer Type Ion Chamber},
author = {Kaur, H and Kumar, S and Sarkar, B and Ganesh, T and Giri, U and Jassal, K and Rathinamuthu, S and Gulia, G and Gopal, V and Mohanti, B and Munshi, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: This study was performed to analyze the agreement between optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) nanoDots measured doses and 0.6 cc Farmer type ionization chamber measured doses during total body irradiation (TBI). Methods: In-vivo dose measurements using OSL nanoDots and Farmer chamber were done in a total of twelve patients who received TBI at our center by bilateral parallel-opposed beams technique. In this technique, the patient is kept inside the TBI box which is filled with rice bags and irradiated using two bilateral parallel opposed beams of 40×40 cm{sup 2} size with 45° collimator rotation at an SSD of 333.5 cm in an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. All patients received a dose of 2 Gy in single fraction as conditioning regimen. The beams were equally weighted at the midplane of the box. The nanoDots were placed over forehead, right and left neck, right and left lung, umbilicus, right and left abdomen, medial part of thigh, knee and toe. A 0.6 cc Farmer chamber was placed in between the thighs of the patient. Measured doses are reported along with the statistical comparisons using paired sample t-test. Results: For the above sites the mean doses were 212.2±21.1, 218.2±7.6, 218.7±9.3, 215.6±9.5, 217.5±11.5, 214.5±7.7, 218.3±6.8, 221.5±15, 229.1±11.0, 220.5±7.7 and 223.3±5.1 cGy respectively. For all OSL measurements the mean dose was 218.6±11.8 cGy. Farmer chamber measurements yielded a mean dose of 208.8±15.6 cGy. Statistical analysis revealed that there was no significant difference between OSL measured doses in forehead, right and left neck, right and left lung, umbilicus, right and left abdomen and toe and Farmer chamber measured doses (0.72≤p≤0.06). However the mean OSL doses at thigh and knee were statistically different (p<0.05) from the Farmer chamber measurements. Conclusion: OSL measurements were found to be in agreement with Farmer type ionization chamber measurements in in-vivo dosimetry of TBI.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956512},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the performance of optically stimulated Luminescence (OSL) nanoDots as in-vivo dosimeter. For the measurements of surface doses as well as scattered plus leakage doses, nanoDots were used during the setup verification as well as during the treatment delivery. Methods: For a total seven patients undergoing radiotherapy by volumetric modulated arc therapy, surface doses from image guidance and scattered plus leakage doses from treatment delivery were measured. Two sets of calibration curves were generated – one for therapy and another for imaging. Two different nanoDots were used for imaging and therapy doses. Imaging nanoDotsmore » were placed at the isocenter only at the time of CBCT and therapy nanoDots were placed at 25 cm away from the isocenter (either in cranial or in caudal direction) only at the time of treatment delivery. During the entire course, nanoDots were placed at the same measurement points. NanoDots were read after 15 minutes of their exposure. For the next fraction, nanoDots were corrected for the residual doses from the previous fractions. Results: Measured surface doses during imaging were 0.14±0.32 cGy, 0.11±0.04 cGy, 0.12±0.53 cGy, 0.04±0.02 cGy, 0.13±0.23 cGy, 0.11±0.43 cGy, 0.10±0.04 cGy with overall mean dose of 0.08±0.1 cGy. Measured doses during treatment delivery, indicative of scattered and leakage dose, were 0.84±0.43 cGy, 1.3±0.4 cGy, 1.4±0.4 cGy, 0.18±0.48 cGy, 0.78±0.29 cGy, 0.27±0.08 cGy, 0.78±0.07 cGy with overall mean dose of 0.61±1.3 cGy. Conclusion: This dosimeter can be used as supplementary unit to verify the doses. No change in the prescription is recommended based on nanoDots measurement. This study is on-going therefore we are presenting only mere number of patients. A large volume data will be presented after completion of the study with proper statistical analysis.« less
  • Purpose: To establish patient surface dose dosimetry for scanning proton beam therapy (SPBT) for breast cancer using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD). Methods: OSLDs were calibrated with SPB under the similar conditions as the treatments for breast cancer. A range shifter (RS) of 5 cm water equivalent thickness (WET) was used. The air gap from the surface of the range shifter to the surface of the phantom was 15 cm. A uniform planar dose generated by nominal energy of 118 MeV was delivered. The range of 118 MeV proton beam after the 5cm RS is approximately 5 cm in water,more » which is the common range for breast treatments. The OSLDs were placed on the surface of high density polyethylene slabs, and a bolus of 1.06 cm WET was used for buildup. A variety of dose levels in the range of 0.5 to 8 Gy were delivered. Under the same condition, an ADCL calibrated parallel plate (PP) chamber was used to measure the reference dose. The correlation between the output signals of OSLDs and the reference doses was established. The calibration of OSLD was verified against the PP chamber measurements for two SPBT breast plans calculated for two patients. Results: the least squares fitting for the OSLD calibration curve was a polynomial function to the order of 2 in the range of 0.5 to 8 Gy (RBE). The differences between the dose measured with OSLDs and PP chamber were within 3% for the two breast proton plans. Conclusion: the calibrated OSLDs under the similar conditions as the treatments can be used for patient surface dose measurements.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) for in-vivo dosimetry of patients undergoing Total Body and Total Marrow Irradiations (TBI and TMI). Methods: TBI treatments of 12 Gy were delivered in 6 BID fractions with the patient on a moving couch under a static 10 MV beam (Synergy, Elekta). TMI treatments of 18 Gy in 9 BID fractions were planned and delivered using a 6 MV TomoTherapy unit (Accuray). To provide a uniform dose to the entire patient length, the treatment was split into 2 adjacent fields junctioned in the thigh region. Our standard clinicalmore » practice involves in vivo dosimetry with MOSFETs for each TBI fraction and TLDs for at least one fraction of the TMI treatment for dose verification. In this study we also used OSLDs. Individual calibration coefficients were obtained for the OSLDs based on irradiations in a solid water phantom to the dose of 50 cGy from Elekta Synergy 10 MV (TBI) and 6 MV (TMI) beams. Calibration coefficients were calculated based on the OSLDs readings taken 2 hrs post-irradiation. For in vivo dosimetry OSLDs were placed alongside MOSFETs for TBI patients and in approximately the same locations as the TLDs for TMI patients. OSLDs were read 2 hours post treatment and compared to the MOSFET and TLD results. Results: OSLD measured doses agreed within 5% with MOSFET and TLD results, with the exception of the junction region in the TMI patient due to very high dose gradient and difficulty of precise and reproducible detector placement. Conclusion: OSLDs are useful for in vivo dosimetry of TBI and TMI patients. The quick post-treatment readout is an advantage over TLDs, allowing the results to be obtained between BID fractions, while wireless detectors are advantageous over MOSFETs for treatments involving a moving couch.« less
  • Purpose: To characterize magnetic field effects on Optically Stimulated Luminescence Detectors (OSLDs) for use as an in-vivo dosimeter in an MRIGRT machine. Methods: Landauer OSLD nano-dots and the MicroStar II reader were used to measure and record OSLDs exposed in and on a solid water phantom in a 10.5 × 10.5 cm{sup 2} field, Co-60, 0.32-Tesla MR-IGRT machine - with and without the presence of the magnetic field. Two orthogonal gantry angles were considered to assess orientation effects on the OSLDs with respect to the incident angle of the radiation beam and magnetic field. The same OSLDs were then usedmore » (after readout and bleaching) when the magnetic field was restored. Results: The measured surface dose decreased by 14.1 ± 1.8% when magnetic field was ’on’ due to contamination electrons being swept away by the field. Doses at both 0.5 cm and 5 cm depth increased by 6.5 ± 0.9% and 8.8 ± 0.5% respectively when the magnetic field was present and the OSLDs oriented with their long axis parallel with the incident beam. This contrasts with an increased dose of 2.7 ± 1.1% when the magnetic field was present and the OSLDs were oriented with their long axis perpendicular to the incident beam. Conclusion: Previous works have shown that OSLDs have a dependence on beam incidence angle. Our current work suggests an additional dependence on the presence of the magnetic field when the beam is not perpendicular to the plane of the detector and this effect needs to be considered. Furthermore, the use of an in-vivo dosimeter was shown to have no effect on image quality during the use of MR guidance. Future work will focus on the use of an electromagnet with a linear accelerator to further characterize these effects.« less
  • Purpose: Optically-stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) are increasingly utilized for in vivo dosimetry of complex radiation delivery techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Evaluation of clinical uncertainties such as placement error has not been performed. This work retrospectively investigates the magnitude of placement error using conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) and its effect on measured/planned dose agreement. Methods: Each OSLD was placed at a physicist-designated location on the patient surface on a weekly basis. The location was given in terms of a gantry angle and two-dimensional offset from central axis. The OSLDs were placed before dailymore » image guidance. We identified 77 CBCTs from 25 head-and-neck patients who received IMRT or VMAT, where OSLDs were visible on the CT image. Grossly misplaced OSLDs were excluded (e.g. wrong laterality). CBCTs were registered with the treatment plan and the distance between the planned and actual OSLD location was calculated in two dimensions in the beam’s eye view. Distances were correlated with measured/planned dose percent differences. Results: OSLDs were grossly misplaced for 5 CBCTs (6.4%). For the remaining 72 CBCTs, average placement error was 7.0±6.0 mm. These errors were not correlated with measured/planned dose percent differences (R{sup 2}=0.0153). Generalizing the dosimetric effect of placement errors may be unreliable. Conclusion: Correct placement of OSLDs for IMRT and VMAT treatments is critical to accurate and precise in vivo dosimetry. Small placement errors could produce large disagreement between measured and planned dose. Further work includes expansion to other treatment sites, examination of planned dose at the actual point of OSLD placement, and the influence of imageguided shifts on measured/planned dose agreement.« less