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Title: SU-F-T-318: Sensitivity and Stability of OSLDs with Filled Deep Electron/hole Traps Under Pre-Irradiation and Bleaching Conditions

Abstract

Purpose: This work evaluated the characteristics of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) with fully filled deep electron/hole traps (OSLDfull) with the bleaching conditions according to the accumulated dose. Methods: The OSLDs were first pre-irradiated with a Co-60 gamma ray at more than 5 kGy, so as to fill the deep electron and hole traps. Using a 6-MV beam, the OSLDfull characteristics were investigated in terms of the full bleaching, fading, dose linearity, and dose sensitivity obtained in response to the accumulated dose values. To facilitate a comparison of the dose sensitivity, OSLDs with un-filled deep electron/hole traps (OSLDempty) were investigated in the same manner. A long-pass filter was used to exclude bleaching-source wavelengths of less than 520 nm. Various bleaching time and wavelength combinations were used in order to determine the optimal bleaching conditions for the OSLD full. Results: The fading for the OSLDfull exhibited stable signals after 8 min, for both 1- and 10-Gy. For 4-h bleaching time and an unfiltered bleaching device, the supralinear index values for the OSLDfull were 1.003, 1.002, 0.999, and 1.001 for doses of 2, 4, 7, and 10 Gy, respectively. For a 65-Gy accumulated dose with a 5-Gy fraction, no variation in dosemore » sensitivity was obtained for the OSLDfull, within a standard deviation of 0.85%, whereas the OSLDempty dose sensitivity decreased by approximately 2.3% per 10 Gy. The filtered bleaching device yielded a highly stable sensitivity for OSLDfull, independent of bleaching time and within a standard deviation of 0.71%, whereas the OSLDempty dose sensitivity decreased by approximately 4.2% per 10 Gy for an accumulated dose of 25 Gy with a 5-Gy fraction. Conclusion: Under the bleaching conditions determined in this study, clinical dosimetry with OSLDfull is highly stable, having an accuracy of 1% with no change in dose sensitivity or linearity at clinical doses. This work was supported by a National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant, funded by the Korea government (MISP) (No. 2014M2B2A4031164), and by the Korea Health Technology R&D Project through the Korea Health Industry Development Institute (KHIDI), funded by the Ministry of Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (HI14C3459).« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648924
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BLEACHING; COBALT 60; GAMMA RADIATION; HOLES; SENSITIVITY; TRAPS

Citation Formats

Kim, J, Park, S, Lee, H, Kim, H, Choi, C, and Park, J. SU-F-T-318: Sensitivity and Stability of OSLDs with Filled Deep Electron/hole Traps Under Pre-Irradiation and Bleaching Conditions. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956503.
Kim, J, Park, S, Lee, H, Kim, H, Choi, C, & Park, J. SU-F-T-318: Sensitivity and Stability of OSLDs with Filled Deep Electron/hole Traps Under Pre-Irradiation and Bleaching Conditions. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956503.
Kim, J, Park, S, Lee, H, Kim, H, Choi, C, and Park, J. Wed . "SU-F-T-318: Sensitivity and Stability of OSLDs with Filled Deep Electron/hole Traps Under Pre-Irradiation and Bleaching Conditions". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956503.
@article{osti_22648924,
title = {SU-F-T-318: Sensitivity and Stability of OSLDs with Filled Deep Electron/hole Traps Under Pre-Irradiation and Bleaching Conditions},
author = {Kim, J and Park, S and Lee, H and Kim, H and Choi, C and Park, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: This work evaluated the characteristics of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) with fully filled deep electron/hole traps (OSLDfull) with the bleaching conditions according to the accumulated dose. Methods: The OSLDs were first pre-irradiated with a Co-60 gamma ray at more than 5 kGy, so as to fill the deep electron and hole traps. Using a 6-MV beam, the OSLDfull characteristics were investigated in terms of the full bleaching, fading, dose linearity, and dose sensitivity obtained in response to the accumulated dose values. To facilitate a comparison of the dose sensitivity, OSLDs with un-filled deep electron/hole traps (OSLDempty) were investigated in the same manner. A long-pass filter was used to exclude bleaching-source wavelengths of less than 520 nm. Various bleaching time and wavelength combinations were used in order to determine the optimal bleaching conditions for the OSLD full. Results: The fading for the OSLDfull exhibited stable signals after 8 min, for both 1- and 10-Gy. For 4-h bleaching time and an unfiltered bleaching device, the supralinear index values for the OSLDfull were 1.003, 1.002, 0.999, and 1.001 for doses of 2, 4, 7, and 10 Gy, respectively. For a 65-Gy accumulated dose with a 5-Gy fraction, no variation in dose sensitivity was obtained for the OSLDfull, within a standard deviation of 0.85%, whereas the OSLDempty dose sensitivity decreased by approximately 2.3% per 10 Gy. The filtered bleaching device yielded a highly stable sensitivity for OSLDfull, independent of bleaching time and within a standard deviation of 0.71%, whereas the OSLDempty dose sensitivity decreased by approximately 4.2% per 10 Gy for an accumulated dose of 25 Gy with a 5-Gy fraction. Conclusion: Under the bleaching conditions determined in this study, clinical dosimetry with OSLDfull is highly stable, having an accuracy of 1% with no change in dose sensitivity or linearity at clinical doses. This work was supported by a National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant, funded by the Korea government (MISP) (No. 2014M2B2A4031164), and by the Korea Health Technology R&D Project through the Korea Health Industry Development Institute (KHIDI), funded by the Ministry of Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (HI14C3459).},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956503},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: The objective of this study is to evaluate radiation sensitivity of optical stimulated luminance dosimeters (OSLDs) by accumulated dose and high dose. Methods: This study was carried out in Co-60 unit (Theratron 780, AECL, and Canada) and used InLight MicroStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL) for reading. We annealed for 30 min using optical annealing system which contained fluorescent lamps (Osram lumilux, 24 W, 280 ∼780 nm). To evaluate change of OSLDs sensitivity by repeated irradiation, the dosimeters were repeatedly irradiated with 1 Gy. And whenever a repeated irradiation, we evaluated OSLDs sensitivity. To evaluate OSLDs sensitivity after accumulatedmore » dose with 5 Gy, We irradiated dose accumulatively (from 1 Gy to 5 Gy) without annealing. And OSLDs was also irradiated with 15, 20, 30 Gy to certify change of OSLDs sensitivity after high dose irradiation. After annealing them, they were irradiated with 1Gy, repeatedly. Results: The OSLDs sensitivity increased up to 3% during irradiating seven times and decreased continuously above 8 times. That dropped by about 0.35 Gy per an irradiation. Finally, after 30 times irradiation, OSLDs sensitivity decreased by about 7%. For accumulated dose from 1 Gy to 5 Gy, OSLDs sensitivity about 1 Gy increased until 4.4% after second times accumulated dose compared with before that. OSLDs sensitivity about 1 Gy decreased by 1.6% in five times irradiation. When OSLDs were irradiated ten times with 1Gy after irradiating high dose (10, 15, 20 Gy), OSLDs sensitivity decreased until 6%, 9%, 12% compared with it before high dose irradiation, respectively. Conclusion: This study certified OSLDs sensitivity by accumulated dose and high dose. When irradiated with 1Gy, repeatedly, OSLDs sensitivity decreased linearly and the reduction rate of OSLDs sensitivity after high dose irradiation had dependence on irradiated dose.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the effect of different bleaching wavelengths on the response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) exposed to accumulated doses of 6 MV photon beams. Methods: In this study the authors used nanoDot OSLDs readout with a MicroStar reader. The authors first characterized the dose-response, fading, and OSL signal loss of OSLDs exposed to doses from 0.5 to 10 Gy. To determine the effect of different bleaching wavelengths on the OSLDs' response, the authors optically treated the OSLDs with 26 W fluorescent lamps in two modes: (i) directly under the lamps for 10, 120, andmore » 600 min and (ii) with a long-pass filter for 55, 600, and 2000 min. Changes in the OSLDs' sensitivity were determined for an irradiation-readout-bleaching-readout cycle after irradiations with 1 and 10 Gy dose fractions. Results: The OSLDs presented supralinearity for doses of 2 Gy and above. The signal loss rates for sequential readouts were (0.287 {+-} 0.007)% per readout in the reader's strong-stimulation mode, and (0.019 {+-} 0.002)% and (0.035 {+-} 0.007)% per readout for doses of 0.2 and 10 Gy, respectively, in the reader's weak-stimulation mode. Fading half-life values ranged from (0.98 {+-} 0.14) min to (1.77 {+-} 0.24) min and fading showed dose dependence for the first 10-min interval. For 10 and 55 min bleaching using modes (i) and (ii), the OSL signal increased 14% for an accumulated dose of 7 Gy (1 Gy fractions). For OSLDs exposed to 10 Gy fractions, the OSL signal increased 30% and 25% for bleaching modes (i) and (ii) and accumulated dose of 70 Gy, respectively. For 120 and 600 min bleaching using modes (i) and (ii), the OSL signal increased 2.7% and 1.5% for an accumulated dose of 7 Gy (1 Gy fractions), respectively. For 10 Gy fractions, the signal increased 14% for bleaching mode (i) (120 min bleaching) and decreased 1.3% for bleaching mode (ii) (600 min bleaching) for an accumulated dose of 70 Gy. For 600 and 2000 min bleaching using modes (i) and (ii), the signal increased 2.3% and 1.8% for an accumulated dose of 7 Gy (1 Gy fractions), respectively. For 10 Gy fractions, the signal increased 10% for mode (i) (600 min bleaching) and decreased 2.5% for mode (ii) (2000 min bleaching) for an accumulated dose of 70 Gy. Conclusions: The dose-response of nanoDot OSLDs read using the MicroStar reader presented supralinearity for doses of 2 Gy and above. The signal loss as a function of sequential readouts depended on dose. Fading also depended on dose for the first 10-min interval. For dose fractions of 1 and 10 Gy, OSLDs may be reused within 3% and 5% accuracies up to the maximum accumulated dose of 7 and 70 Gy investigated in this study, respectively. These accuracies were obtained after the OSLDs were bleached with a light source with wavelengths above about 495 nm. The authors also concluded that changes in sensitivity of OSLDs depended on bleaching time, accumulated dose, and wavelength spectrum of the bleaching source.« less
  • Purpose: Rotational total skin electron irradiation (RTSEI) is used in the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Due to inter-film uniformity variations the dosimetry measurement of a large electron beam of a very low energy is challenging. This work provides a method to improve the accuracy of flatness and symmetry for a very large treatment field of low electron energy used in dual beam RTSEI. Methods: RTSEI is delivered by dual angles field a gantry of ±20 degrees of 270 to cover the upper and the lower halves of the patient body with acceptable beam uniformity. The field size is inmore » the order of 230cm in vertical height and 120 cm in horizontal width and beam energy is a degraded 6 MeV (6 mm of PMMA spoiler). We utilized parallel plate chambers, Gafchromic films and OSLDs as a measuring devices for absolute dose, B-Factor, stationary and rotational percent depth dose and beam uniformity. To reduce inter-film dosimetric variation we introduced a new specific correction method to analyze beam uniformity. This correction method uses some image processing techniques combining film value before and after radiation dose to compensate the inter-variation dose response differences among films. Results: Stationary and rotational depth of dose demonstrated that the Rp is 2 cm for rotational and the maximum dose is shifted toward the surface (3mm). The dosimetry for the phantom showed that dose uniformity reduced to 3.01% for the vertical flatness and 2.35% for horizontal flatness after correction thus achieving better flatness and uniformity. The absolute dose readings of calibrated films after our correction matched with the readings from OSLD. Conclusion: The proposed correction method for Gafchromic films will be a useful tool to correct inter-film dosimetric variation for the future clinical film dosimetry verification in very large fields, allowing the optimizations of other parameters.« less
  • Purpose: To support radiobiological research with the Xstrahl small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) by developing a simple and effective method using commercially available optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) that ensures dose output consistency. Methods: The SARRP output is calibrated according to the vendor standards and TG-61 protocol utilizing an ADCL calibrated ion chamber and electrometer at 2 cm depth of solid water. A cross calibration is performed by replacing the ion chamber with five OSLDs at the 2 cm depth. The OSLDs are irradiated to 500 cGy with 220 keV at 13 mA (78s delivery time) with a coppermore » filter for an uncollimated 17×17 cm{sup 2} aperture. Instead of the absolute dose, the total amount of raw counts are collected from the OSLD reader and used for analysis. This constancy procedure was performed two more times over the course of three weeks with two OLSDs for validity. Results: The average reading for all OSLDs is 494939 with a 1-sigma standard deviation of the 5.8%. With an acceptable dose output range of ±10%, the OSLD readings have a counts range of [445445, 544433]. Conclusion: This method of using nanoDot™ OSLDs to perform output constancy checks for the SARRP ensures the output of the device is within 10% from the time of calibration and is convenient as well as time efficient. Because this, the frequency of output checks can be increased, which can improve the output stability for research with this device. The output trend of the SARRP will continue to be monitored in the future to establish a timeline for constancy checks and recalibration.« less
  • Purpose: We had several mycosis fungoides patients with a limited disease to about half of the skin surface. A custom-made plywood shield was used to protect the non-targeted skin region with our total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) technique. We report a dosimetric evaluation for our “hemi-body” skin electron irradiation technique. Methods: The technique is similar to our clinical total skin electron irradiation (TSEI), performed with a six-pair dual field (Stanford technique) at an extended source-to-skin distance (SSD) of 377 cm, with the addition of a plywood shield placed 50 cm from the patient. The shield is made of three layersmore » of standard 5/8″ thick plywood (total thickness of 4.75 cm) that are clamped securely on an adjustable-height stand. Gafchromic EBT3 films were used in assessing the shield’s transmission factor and the extend of the dose penumbra region. To verify the dose delivered for hemi-body skin radiation in a real patient treatment, in-vivo dosimetry using Gafchromic EBT3 films were performed. Film pieces were taped on the patient skin to measure the dose received during the first two fractions, placed on the forehead and upper body (shielded region); and also at the level of pelvic area, left thigh, and left ankle. Results: The shield transmission factor was found to be 10%, and the width of the penumbra (80-to-20% dose fall-off) was about 12 cm. In-vivo dosimetry of a real case confirmed the expected shielded area dose. Conclusion: Hemi-Body skin electron irradiation at an extended SSD is feasible with the addition of a plywood shield at a distance from patient skin. The penumbra dose region and the shield’s transmission factor should be evaluated prior to clinical use. We have treated several hemi-body skin patients with our custom-made plywood shield, the current patient measurements are representative of these for other patients as well.« less