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Title: SU-F-T-259: GPR Tables for the Estimation of Mid-Plane Dose Using EPID

Abstract

Purpose: To develop a simple method for estimating the mid-plane dose (MPD) of a patient using Electronic Portal imaging Device (EPID). Methods: A Varian TrueBeam with aSi100 EPID was used in this study. The EPID images were acquired for a 30 cm × 30 cm homogeneous slab phantom and a 30 cm diameter 20 cm thick cylindrical phantom in the continuous dosimetry mode. The acquired EPID images in XIM format were imported into in-house MATLAB program for the data analysis. First, the dosimetric characteristics of EPID were studied for dose-response linearity, dose-rate dependence, and field size dependence. Next, the average pixels values of the EPID images were correlated with the MPD measured by an ionisation chamber for various thicknesses of the slab phantom (8 cm – 30 cm) and for various square field sizes (3×3 cm{sup 2} – 25×25 cm{sup 2} at the isocenter). Look-up tables called as GPR tables were then generated for both SSD and SAD setup by taking the ratio of MPD measured by the ionisation chamber and the corresponding EPID pixel values. The accuracy of the GPR tables was evaluated by varying the field size, phantom thickness, and wedge angles with the slab and cylindrical phantoms.more » Results: The dose response of EPID was linear from 20 MU to 300 MU. The EPID response for different dose rates from 40 MU/min to 600 MU/min was within ±1%. The difference in the doses from the GPR tables and the doses measured by the ionization chambers were within 2% for slab phantoms, and 3% for the cylindrical phantom for various field sizes, phantom thickness, and wedge angles. Conclusion: GPR tables are a ready reckoner for in-vivo dosimetry and it can be used to quickly estimate the MPD value from the EPID images with an accuracy of ±3% for common clinical treatment. project work funded by Union for International cancer control(UICC) under ICRETT fellowship.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Government Arignar Anna Memorial Cancer Hospital & Research Institute, Kanchipuram, TAMILNADU (India)
  2. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648874
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CYLINDRICAL CONFIGURATION; DOSE RATES; DOSIMETRY; IMAGES; IN VIVO; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; MAXIMUM PERMISSIBLE DOSE; PHANTOMS; THICKNESS

Citation Formats

Annamalai, Gopiraj, and Watanabe, Yoichi. SU-F-T-259: GPR Tables for the Estimation of Mid-Plane Dose Using EPID. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956399.
Annamalai, Gopiraj, & Watanabe, Yoichi. SU-F-T-259: GPR Tables for the Estimation of Mid-Plane Dose Using EPID. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956399.
Annamalai, Gopiraj, and Watanabe, Yoichi. Wed . "SU-F-T-259: GPR Tables for the Estimation of Mid-Plane Dose Using EPID". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956399.
@article{osti_22648874,
title = {SU-F-T-259: GPR Tables for the Estimation of Mid-Plane Dose Using EPID},
author = {Annamalai, Gopiraj and Watanabe, Yoichi},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To develop a simple method for estimating the mid-plane dose (MPD) of a patient using Electronic Portal imaging Device (EPID). Methods: A Varian TrueBeam with aSi100 EPID was used in this study. The EPID images were acquired for a 30 cm × 30 cm homogeneous slab phantom and a 30 cm diameter 20 cm thick cylindrical phantom in the continuous dosimetry mode. The acquired EPID images in XIM format were imported into in-house MATLAB program for the data analysis. First, the dosimetric characteristics of EPID were studied for dose-response linearity, dose-rate dependence, and field size dependence. Next, the average pixels values of the EPID images were correlated with the MPD measured by an ionisation chamber for various thicknesses of the slab phantom (8 cm – 30 cm) and for various square field sizes (3×3 cm{sup 2} – 25×25 cm{sup 2} at the isocenter). Look-up tables called as GPR tables were then generated for both SSD and SAD setup by taking the ratio of MPD measured by the ionisation chamber and the corresponding EPID pixel values. The accuracy of the GPR tables was evaluated by varying the field size, phantom thickness, and wedge angles with the slab and cylindrical phantoms. Results: The dose response of EPID was linear from 20 MU to 300 MU. The EPID response for different dose rates from 40 MU/min to 600 MU/min was within ±1%. The difference in the doses from the GPR tables and the doses measured by the ionization chambers were within 2% for slab phantoms, and 3% for the cylindrical phantom for various field sizes, phantom thickness, and wedge angles. Conclusion: GPR tables are a ready reckoner for in-vivo dosimetry and it can be used to quickly estimate the MPD value from the EPID images with an accuracy of ±3% for common clinical treatment. project work funded by Union for International cancer control(UICC) under ICRETT fellowship.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956399},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}