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Title: SU-F-T-235: Optical Scan Based Collision Avoidance Using Multiple Stereotactic Cameras During Simulation

Abstract

Purpose: To demonstrate the ability to quickly generate an accurate collision avoidance map using multiple stereotactic cameras during simulation. Methods: Three Kinect stereotactic cameras were placed in the CT simulation room and optically calibrated to the DICOM isocenter. Immediately before scanning, the patient was optically imaged to generate a 3D polygon mesh, which was used to calculate the collision avoidance area using our previously developed framework. The mesh was visually compared to the CT scan body contour to ensure accurate coordinate alignment. To test the accuracy of the collision calculation, the patient and machine were physically maneuvered in the treatment room to calculated collision boundaries. Results: The optical scan and collision calculation took 38.0 seconds and 2.5 seconds to complete respectively. The collision prediction accuracy was determined using a receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis, where the true positive, true negative, false positive and false negative values were 837, 821, 43, and 79 points respectively. The ROC accuracy was 93.1% over the sampled collision space. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a framework which is fast and accurate for predicting collision avoidance for treatment which can be determined during the normal simulation process. Because of the speed, the system could be used tomore » add a layer of safety with a negligible impact on the normal patient simulation experience. This information could be used during treatment planning to explore the feasible geometries when optimizing plans. Research supported by Varian Medical Systems.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648851
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; AVOIDANCE; CAMERAS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; PATIENTS; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Cardan, R, Popple, R, Dobelbower, M, De Los Santos, J, and Fiveash, J. SU-F-T-235: Optical Scan Based Collision Avoidance Using Multiple Stereotactic Cameras During Simulation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956374.
Cardan, R, Popple, R, Dobelbower, M, De Los Santos, J, & Fiveash, J. SU-F-T-235: Optical Scan Based Collision Avoidance Using Multiple Stereotactic Cameras During Simulation. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956374.
Cardan, R, Popple, R, Dobelbower, M, De Los Santos, J, and Fiveash, J. 2016. "SU-F-T-235: Optical Scan Based Collision Avoidance Using Multiple Stereotactic Cameras During Simulation". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956374.
@article{osti_22648851,
title = {SU-F-T-235: Optical Scan Based Collision Avoidance Using Multiple Stereotactic Cameras During Simulation},
author = {Cardan, R and Popple, R and Dobelbower, M and De Los Santos, J and Fiveash, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To demonstrate the ability to quickly generate an accurate collision avoidance map using multiple stereotactic cameras during simulation. Methods: Three Kinect stereotactic cameras were placed in the CT simulation room and optically calibrated to the DICOM isocenter. Immediately before scanning, the patient was optically imaged to generate a 3D polygon mesh, which was used to calculate the collision avoidance area using our previously developed framework. The mesh was visually compared to the CT scan body contour to ensure accurate coordinate alignment. To test the accuracy of the collision calculation, the patient and machine were physically maneuvered in the treatment room to calculated collision boundaries. Results: The optical scan and collision calculation took 38.0 seconds and 2.5 seconds to complete respectively. The collision prediction accuracy was determined using a receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis, where the true positive, true negative, false positive and false negative values were 837, 821, 43, and 79 points respectively. The ROC accuracy was 93.1% over the sampled collision space. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a framework which is fast and accurate for predicting collision avoidance for treatment which can be determined during the normal simulation process. Because of the speed, the system could be used to add a layer of safety with a negligible impact on the normal patient simulation experience. This information could be used during treatment planning to explore the feasible geometries when optimizing plans. Research supported by Varian Medical Systems.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956374},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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