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Title: SU-F-T-234: Quality Improvements in the Electronic Medical Record of Patients Treated with High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

Abstract

Purpose: To improve workflow efficiency and patient safety by assessing the quality control documentation for HDR brachytherapy within our Electronic Medical Record System (Mosaiq). Methods: A list of parameters based on NRC regulations, our quality management program (QMP), recommendations of the ACR and the American Brachytherapy Society, and HDR treatment planning risks identified in our previous FMEA study was made. Next, the parameter entries were classified according to the type of data input—manual, electronic, or both. Manual entry included the electronic Brachytherapy Treatment Record (BTR) and pre-treatment Mosaiq Assessments list. Oncentra Treatment Reports (OTR) from the Oncentra Treatment Control System constituted the electronic data. The OTR includes a Pre-treatment Report for each fraction, and a Treatment Summary Report at the completion of treatment. Each entry was then examined for appropriateness and completeness of data; adjustments and additions as necessary were then made. Results: Ten out of twenty-one recorded treatment parameters were identified to be documented within both the BTR and OTR. Of these ten redundancies, eight were changed from recorded values to a simple checklist in the BTR to avoid recording errors. The other redundancies were kept in both documents due to their value to ensuring patient safety. An editmore » was made to the current BTR quality assessment; this change revises the definition of a medical event in accordance with ODH Regulation 3701:1-58-101. One addition was made to the current QMP documents regarding HDR. This addition requires a physician to be present through the duration of HDR treatment in accordance with ODH Regulation 3701:1-58-59; Paragraph (F); Section (2); Subsection (a). Conclusion: Careful examination of HDR documentation that originates from different sources can help to improve the accuracy and reliability of the documents. In addition, there may be a small improvement in efficiency due to elimination of unnecessary redundancies.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States)
  2. Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648850
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BRACHYTHERAPY; CONTROL SYSTEMS; DOCUMENTATION; DOSE RATES; MEDICAL RECORDS; PATIENTS; QUALITY CONTROL; RADIATION PROTECTION; RADIATION PROTECTION LAWS; REGULATIONS

Citation Formats

Diener, T, and Wilkinson, D. SU-F-T-234: Quality Improvements in the Electronic Medical Record of Patients Treated with High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956373.
Diener, T, & Wilkinson, D. SU-F-T-234: Quality Improvements in the Electronic Medical Record of Patients Treated with High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956373.
Diener, T, and Wilkinson, D. 2016. "SU-F-T-234: Quality Improvements in the Electronic Medical Record of Patients Treated with High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956373.
@article{osti_22648850,
title = {SU-F-T-234: Quality Improvements in the Electronic Medical Record of Patients Treated with High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy},
author = {Diener, T and Wilkinson, D},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To improve workflow efficiency and patient safety by assessing the quality control documentation for HDR brachytherapy within our Electronic Medical Record System (Mosaiq). Methods: A list of parameters based on NRC regulations, our quality management program (QMP), recommendations of the ACR and the American Brachytherapy Society, and HDR treatment planning risks identified in our previous FMEA study was made. Next, the parameter entries were classified according to the type of data input—manual, electronic, or both. Manual entry included the electronic Brachytherapy Treatment Record (BTR) and pre-treatment Mosaiq Assessments list. Oncentra Treatment Reports (OTR) from the Oncentra Treatment Control System constituted the electronic data. The OTR includes a Pre-treatment Report for each fraction, and a Treatment Summary Report at the completion of treatment. Each entry was then examined for appropriateness and completeness of data; adjustments and additions as necessary were then made. Results: Ten out of twenty-one recorded treatment parameters were identified to be documented within both the BTR and OTR. Of these ten redundancies, eight were changed from recorded values to a simple checklist in the BTR to avoid recording errors. The other redundancies were kept in both documents due to their value to ensuring patient safety. An edit was made to the current BTR quality assessment; this change revises the definition of a medical event in accordance with ODH Regulation 3701:1-58-101. One addition was made to the current QMP documents regarding HDR. This addition requires a physician to be present through the duration of HDR treatment in accordance with ODH Regulation 3701:1-58-59; Paragraph (F); Section (2); Subsection (a). Conclusion: Careful examination of HDR documentation that originates from different sources can help to improve the accuracy and reliability of the documents. In addition, there may be a small improvement in efficiency due to elimination of unnecessary redundancies.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956373},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • This paper reports a dosimetric study of 43 patients treated with a combination of concomitant radiotherapy and cisplatin for locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix with the aim of investigating the correlation between the radiation dose to the rectum and the incidence of late rectal complications. Radiotherapy consisted of 46 Gy external beam irradiation plus three high dose rate intracavitary treatments given weekly, concurrent with the last 3 weeks of external beam therapy, to a total dose of 30 Gy to a point A. Cisplatin 30 mg/m[sup 2] was given weekly throughout the duration of the external beam irradiation. Themore » brachytherapy irradiated volume was reconstructed from the orthogonal treatment radiographs to accurately locate the reference points defined by the International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements, report 38. The doses calculated at these points were compared to in vivo dose measurements performed immediately prior to treatment. The group of patients who were calculated to have received a dose to the rectal reference point greater than the prescribed point A dose (9/13) had a significantly greater probability of development of late rectal complications compared to the group of patients who were calculated to have received less than the prescribed point A dose at this rectal point (7/30), p = 0.003. There was no correlation of rate of complication with the in vivo measured dose in the rectum, stage of disease, or age. At 40 months post treatment, the group of patients receiving the higher dose to the rectal reference point had an actuarial rate of serious (Grade 3 and 4) rectal complications of 46% compared to a rate of 14% in the remainder. In terms of survival, the group of patients receiving the higher dose to the rectal reference point have all survived, whereas the group of patients receiving the lower dose to the rectal reference point have a significantly different rate of survival of 72%, p = 0.046. 24 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between dosimetric parameters and late rectal and urinary toxicities in high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) used as monotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: The data of 83 patients treated with HDR-BT alone for prostate cancer from 2001 through 2005 at Osaka University Hospital were analyzed. Median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 18-70). The total prescribed dose was 54 Gy in nine fractions over 5 days. Correlation between dosimetric parameters and late toxicities was examined. Results: The means of V30, V40, V50, V60, V70, D1cc, D2cc, D5cc, and D10cc of the rectum were significantly higher inmore » 18 patients who presented with late rectal toxicity (Grades 1-3 rectal bleeding) than in the other 65 patients who did not. A significant difference was observed for D1cc-10cc but not for D5-90. The statistically most significant difference was observed for V40 and D5cc. Late rectal toxicity rate was significantly higher for patients with rectal V40 >= 8 cc than those with the rectal V40 < 8 cc (42% vs. 8%; p < 0.001), as well as for patients with rectal D5cc >= 27 Gy compared with those with rectal D5cc < 27 Gy (50% vs. 11%; p < 0.001). Dosimetric parameters of the urethra of 15 patients with late urinary toxicity were not significantly different from the 68 patients without toxicity. Conclusion: Rectal V40 < 8 cc and D5cc < 27 Gy may be dose-volume constraints in HDR-BT used as monotherapy for prostate cancer.« less
  • Purpose: The present study was undertaken to determine factors predictive of toxicity, patterns of failure, and survival in 60 adult patients with soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity and superficial trunk treated with combined perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The patients were treated with surgical resection and perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (16 or 24 Gy) for negative and close/microscopically positive resection margins, respectively. External beam radiotherapy (45 Gy) was added postoperatively to reach a 2-Gy equivalent dose of 62.9 and 72.3 Gy, respectively. Adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide and doxorubicin was given to patients with advanced high-grademore » tumors. Results: Grade 3 toxic events were observed in 18 patients (30%) and Grade 4 events in 6 patients (10%). No Grade 5 events were observed. A location in the lower limb was significant for Grade 3 or greater toxic events on multivariate analysis (p = .013), and the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line showed a trend toward statistical significance (p = .086). The local control, locoregional control, and distant control rate at 9 years was 77.4%, 69.5%, and 63.8%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, microscopically involved margins correlated with local control (p = .036) and locoregional control (p = .007) and tumor size correlated with distant metastases (p = .004). The 9-year disease-free survival and overall survival rate was 47.0% and 61.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed poorer disease-free survival rates for patients with tumors >6 cm (p = .005) and microscopically involved margins (p = .043), and overall survival rates decreased with increasing tumor size (p = .011). Conclusions: Grade 3 or greater wound complications can probably be decreased using meticulous treatment planning to decrease the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line, especially in lower limb locations. Microscopically involved margins remain a predictor of local and locoregional failure, despite radiation doses >70 Gy. Patients with tumors {>=}6 cm and microscopically involved margins are at high risk of treatment failure and death from the development of distant metastases.« less
  • Purpose: To objectively evaluate the radiation dermatitis caused by accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: The skin color and moisture changes were examined using a newly installed spectrophotometer and corneometer in 22 patients who had undergone APBI using open cavity implant high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (36 Gy in six fractions) and compared with the corresponding values for 44 patients in an external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) control group (50-60 Gy in 25-30 fractions within 5-6 weeks) after breast conserving surgery. Results: All values changed significantly as a result of APBI. The extent of elevation in amore » Asterisk-Operator (reddish) and reduction in L Asterisk-Operator (black) values caused by APBI were similar to those for EBRT, with slightly delayed recovery for 6-12 months after treatment owing to the surgical procedure. In contrast, only APBI caused a change in the b Asterisk-Operator values, and EBRT did not, demonstrating that the reduction in b Asterisk-Operator values (yellowish) depends largely on the surgical procedure. The changes in moisture were less severe after APBI than after EBRT, and the recovery was more rapid. The toxicity assessment using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, showed that all dermatitis caused by APBI was Grade 2 or less. Conclusion: An objective analysis can quantify the effects of APBI procedures on color and moisture cosmesis. The radiation dermatitis caused by APBI using the present schedule showed an equivalent effect on skin color and a less severe effect on moisture than the effects caused by standard EBRT.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the influence of patient- and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From a prospectively collected database of 2250 men treated at Mount Sinai Hospital from 1990 to 2004 with low-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer, 558 men with either one or more intermediate-risk features (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level 10-20 ng/mL, Gleason score 7, or Stage T2b) were identified who had a minimum follow-up of 24 months and postimplant CT-based dosimetric analysis. Biologically effective dose (BED) values were calculated to compare doses from different isotopes and treatment regimens.more » Patients were treated with brachytherapy with or without hormone therapy and/or external-beam radiotherapy. Patient- and treatment-related factors were analyzed with respect to FFbF. The median follow-up was 60 months (range, 24-167 months). Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Univariate analyses were used to determine whether any variable was predictive of FFbF. A two-sided p value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results: Overall, the actuarial FFbF at 10 years was 86%. Dose (BED <150 Gy{sub 2} vs. {>=}150 Gy{sub 2}) was the only significant predictor of FFbF (p < 0.001). None of the other variables (PSA, external-beam radiotherapy, Gleason score, treatment type, hormones, stage, and number of risk factors) was found to be a statistically significant predictor of 10-year FFbF. Conclusions: Radiation dose is an important predictor of FFbF in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Treatment should continue to be individualized according to presenting disease characteristics until results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 0232 become available.« less